Effective ways to use Tiddlywiki?

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Logan Chin

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Aug 3, 2020, 3:07:19 PM8/3/20
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Hello,

I've had TW for around 10 days now, and, despite my lack of experience with open-source software, I feel like I have a good understanding of its functionality and UI. 

Right now, I am looking to use TW in a way that organizes almost every aspect of my life – school, every-day tasks, thoughts, career plans/goals, etc. Does anyone have any examples or tutorials that show an effective system/methodology to manage all these things? The goal is to learn what different people are doing so that, eventually, I'll have enough fluency to tailor my own methodology for my specific needs.

Much appreciated!
















Odin Jorna

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Aug 3, 2020, 3:51:46 PM8/3/20
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Have a look at https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/tiddlywiki-gtd

One person made a Getting Things Done variant of TiddlyWiki that was pretty extensive. Maybe this can give you some inspiration.

TiddlyWiki is extremely versatile, if you invest some time into learning wikitext, you can change it to your own needs.

Op maandag 3 augustus 2020 21:07:19 UTC+2 schreef Logan Chin:

clutterstack

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Aug 3, 2020, 5:16:45 PM8/3/20
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Simon Baird's mGSD was great for that. I still have one that (I think) works fine on a local machine.

I'll just say: TiddlyWiki is like Minecraft. You can build worlds in it, so the most important thing if you want it to help your productivity, rather than become your product, is to set constraints.

(Perhaps contradicting myself: check David Gifford's TiddlyWiki Toolmap for inspiration: https://dynalist.io/d/zUP-nIWu2FFoXH-oM7L7d9DM)

Cheers,
Chris

TW Tones

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Aug 3, 2020, 7:32:30 PM8/3/20
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Logan,

Welcome to the tiddlyverse. based on my own experience here is a high level approach below.

But first, Personally I believe tiddlywiki offers users and developers a platform on which to evolve solutions over time. It is the democratisation of general purpose software to help us make full use of our general purpose computers and the universal client - the browser. All of this is on top of standard established internet technologies, so you will develop or use a lot of transferable skills in the process. Thus learning and adopting the tiddlywiki platform is an investment in your future. In this case you own the content and design, chose where it is stored and who has access. You build the product, rather than being the product.
  • Search, and try things that seem like they may be your solution
    • Import or drop plugins and macros on an 
  • Pick one or more that work for you now!
  • Keep it simple if possible until you become better informed. eg start with simple task lists before you adopt a GTD edition, but explore the todo/GTD alternatives available.
  • Be prepared to evolve your solution later
    • Always ensure you could extract knowledge or information tiddlers from your wiki if you want to reinvent a wiki.
  • Consider dividing your life into different wikis, their are plenty of ways to integrate multiple wikis.
  • Start small, learn, grow
  • Make sure the backup process is working
  • Use auto save where practical.
Regards
Tony

Birthe C

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Aug 3, 2020, 9:54:01 PM8/3/20
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Anyone know where to find Cardo?
This is an older wiki, haven't heard anything about that for a long while. Roma Hicks http://gsd5.tiddlyspot.com/

I think a lot of people are dreaming of a wiki like the one you describe. It easily get complicated to create, but also time consuming to use. I think it is important to find the right balance.

Birthe

bimlas

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Aug 4, 2020, 3:19:47 AM8/4/20
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I recently started applying the principles of Andy Matuschak’s Evergreen Notes, which is based on Zettelkasten, but the same principle can also be found under the name digital garden. The main principles of this type of methodologies are roughly the same:
  • Make notes so that thoughts and experiences are not lost, in addition, the wording helps to understand
  • Add a unique ID to your notes (in TiddlyWiki, it’s simply that two notes can’t have the same title)
  • There should be only one well-defined idea on a note
  • Link related notes frequently because links are more expressive than a table of contents or text search
A non-linear, link-centered collection of notes is much closer to your own thinking than any book divided into chapters and subchapters because the links follow your line of thought rather than the notes being related to each other in a predefined grouping.

Reading a book gives us the information in a predetermined order. When you read your notes that are linked to each other, you determine the order in which topic you want to learn more by clicking on the link of the topic. If you are interested in another area of ​​a particular topic, you are following a link to the "parent" of that note.

The hierarchy corresponding to the table of contents in the book is given by the index notes (glossary or a table of contents of only one topic), but they do not necessarily form a tree structure where one list is subordinate to another, but rather should be thought of as a "view": collecting notes that are related in some way so that you can see the topic.

It follows that using a link-based note collection, we can search for a topic by following links and backlinks instead of full text search, because we can find results that are more accurate and follows our mind as opposed to having to search a list of notes that contain the searched words.

Store meta information (tags, unique attributes) in the text of the note instead of entering it in different software-dependent fields (eg TiddlyWiki fields) because
  • those who are unfamiliar with the use of the software can also view these values
  • text search can find them too, you don’t have to use a unique search solution
  • when refactoring the note, you also move the metainformation together with the text, you do not need to copy them from the fields of the original note
  • if you use the value of a custom field as a link, it may not appear in the backlinks of the link's destination
    • it can cause an error when renaming a note if you can't find all the links to it
Why are links important?
  • Everyone knows how to use them, there is no need to explain where to click
  • Notes are an integral part of the text, so they can mostly be used independently of software (plain text, wiki software, task manager, etc.).
  • An index note can also contain links to a structured list that is a software-independent table of contents
  • We see all the connections in one place, we don’t have to jump back and forth between the table of contents and the text of the note
    • If software allows it, we can actually display a kind of table of contents below the note (eg a view template in TiddlyWiki that shows a list of <<list-tagged-draggable>>)
  • Links can be recursive without hassle and can easily connect any distant notes
  • At first it may seem that link-based navigation is slower, but if we combine the right topics, thoughts, experiences and basically use a lot of links, we can connect directly between relevant notes and this navigation is faster like anything else
  • The text surrounding the link adds shade and weight to the link, the relationship between the two notes, which cannot be marked otherwise (eg "read the details in Note X and you can find a counterexample in Note Y", "Attention! Also read the Note Z!")
    • It follows that links can understandably link even minimally related topics (e.g., "a Builder pattern is similar to Designing a house")
    • In addition, listing backlinks helps you recall already forgotten links
    • You can also give weight to the link by formatting the text (e.g. highlighted in bold)
  • If we want to rename the note and our note taker does not support automatic renaming, it actually helps us because we need to rewrite all the links to the new name by hand, so we will also check that the link is still required, valid with the new name.
I think it is more expedient to increase the usability of the note collection by building notes in the right way instead of technical solutions.

Saq Imtiaz

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Aug 4, 2020, 3:41:32 AM8/4/20
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@bimlas that was a very interesting read, even for someone like me that doesn't really take many notes (if at all). It makes me think about patterns of cognition and how the process, need and inherent value of note taking varies from person to person. The domain of activity is probably also just as important a consideration, in that the value of such a note taking process and the notes themselves will vary depending on the subject matter.

What you describe is also a good example of creating solutions that put the problem first, rather than the technology, as well as highlighting the value of establishing effective best practices and routines. In this lies an interesting UX challenge as well, how to facilitate such a solution without adding unnecessary complexity or barriers.

Thank you for taking the time to share your thoughts. I know it takes a while considering the language barrier so it is doubly appreciated.
Cheers,

Saq

bimlas

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Aug 4, 2020, 3:50:54 AM8/4/20
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Saq,

In this lies an interesting UX challenge as well, how to facilitate such a solution without adding unnecessary complexity or barriers.

The interesting thing about it all is that you don't need any special UX, the TiddlyWiki empty edition contains everything you need to create such a system (for example, you can access the backlinks in the tiddler dropdown menu -> Info -> References). The concept of links has been around for a long time and I use them too, but only recently have I really understood their power. 
 
I know it takes a while considering the language barrier so it is doubly appreciated.

Also the merit of writing notes: I didn’t have to articulate these thoughts because they were already in my notes, I just copied them into Google Translator and refined them a bit. 

Saq Imtiaz

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Aug 4, 2020, 4:10:19 AM8/4/20
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@bimlas


The interesting thing about it all is that you don't need any special UX, the TiddlyWiki empty edition contains everything you need to create such a system (for example, you can access the backlinks in the tiddler dropdown menu -> Info -> References). The concept of links has been around for a long time and I use them too, but only recently have I really understood their power. 

I agree that no special UX is needed, but good minimal and non-intrusive UX can facilitate such notetaking. For better examples I would need to give this some thought, but thinking of the top of my head it would be interesting to do some user studies to see if things like making the backlinks always visible, providing link autocompletion and even link suggestions based on content subject matter are helpful in creating and also adhering to such a note taking routine.

A lot of my work is with low literacy and low resource populations and some of the patterns involved are quite similar: putting the problem first, keeping the solution simple which often means it maps well to and from paper based solutions, and using UX where feasible to facilitate in a non-intrusive manner.

Anyway, I think we are on a similar if not the same wavelength here :)

Cheers,
Saq

 

bimlas

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Aug 4, 2020, 4:37:36 AM8/4/20
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Saq Imtiaz

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Aug 4, 2020, 4:58:25 AM8/4/20
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@bimlas right, very cool, so we are definitely on the same page. I see a lot of myself in what you saying about wanting your notes in plain text files and reverting to texteditor + text files after trying other tools. I use TiddlyWiki as an optional organizational layer on top of my text files. This works well for me but that is probably also due to the nature of the few notes that I do take.

Your original writeup in this thread also reminds me a lot of work I've done in the past on electronic medical records and establishing and facilitating note taking routines that doctors and health-care workers will actually adhere to.

Thanks for sharing your setup. My interest at this time is purely conceptual, this isn't something I plan to pursue, but its great to have a peek and what you are doing.

Cheers,
Saq

TW Tones

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Aug 4, 2020, 6:28:09 AM8/4/20
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Bimlas

You put a good argument here for a less technical and organic way of taking notes or collecting data but then building and extracting information. Meaning and discovering relationships.

I appreciate people reflecting deeply on what they do.

Having worked professionally in knowledge and information management I find considering it all about information, is a valuable approach. This means ensuring you capture and never loose the information available to you and where possible support the discovery of new relationships.

Technically the system we use should encourage us recording anything of possible value, not get in our way and not allowing information to be destroyed. There are many ways we inadvertently destroy information. It is in preserving and build ing information that I think the technology can excel, not so much a second brain but a fabric, structure on which to extend your brain.

All the above is true on its own, but I also believe the right software can discover information and relationships and return more than it is given.

We can build such a platform on tiddlywiki.

Regards
TW Tones aka TonyM

bimlas

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Aug 4, 2020, 7:00:48 AM8/4/20
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TW Tones,

All the above is true on its own, but I also believe the right software can discover information and relationships and return more than it is given.

You are right that technology can help us achieve our goal IF we know exactly what our goal is. :)

For example, I've attached a search tab that lets you create a new tiddler based on what you’re looking for, so you can be pretty sure you’re not describing the same idea twice. If you consistently use this method to create tiddlers, you will immediately check when entering the name of the new tiddler to see if you have previously written a note on that topic.

The "plugin" requires you to mark new tiddlers with the Reading Inbox or Writing Inbox tag to keep them separate from the final notes (based on the advice of Evergreen Notes).

It also lists "missing" tiddlers (i.e., tiddlers that don't exist but have a link to them), so you can access information you've already collected about it by viewing the backlinks. 
bimlas_sidebar_search-with-new-button.json

bimlas

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Aug 4, 2020, 7:14:47 AM8/4/20
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Updated the search tab to exclude system tiddlers from "missing" titles (see attachment).
bimlas_sidebar_search-with-new-button.json

Saq Imtiaz

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Aug 4, 2020, 7:23:19 AM8/4/20
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@bimlas
 
For example, I've attached a search tab that lets you create a new tiddler based on what you’re looking for, so you can be pretty sure you’re not describing the same idea twice. If you consistently use this method to create tiddlers, you will immediately check when entering the name of the new tiddler to see if you have previously written a note on that topic.

This is essentially how I use my Notaton editor, the one from the google hangout video with Jeremy. You've encouraged to me consider crosslinking my notes as I go, though the motivation and need for doing so or even adding tags has been sparse so far. I think that's been partly because the tag based approach doesn't fit into my larger workflow.

I think you've done well to illustrate the point that good UX design definitely can facilitate the note taking approach that you described. :)

Cheers,
Saq

bimlas

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Aug 4, 2020, 7:51:18 AM8/4/20
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Saq,
 
[I said] The interesting thing about it all is that you don't need any special UX ...
[I said] I've attached a search tab ...
 
[You said] I think you've done well to illustrate the point that good UX design definitely can facilitate the note taking approach that you described. :)

:D Ok, you're right. Let me correct myself: you don't need any special UX, but good to have. :)
 

Saq Imtiaz

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Aug 4, 2020, 8:11:55 AM8/4/20
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@bimlas haha, agreed. Not a "must have" but a "nice to have". This has been a good discussion and I've enjoyed reading and seeing how you are going about things. :)

You've definitely encouraged me to give serious consideration to start adding links in some of my notes where it could be relevant. 

Cheers,
Saq

Charlie J Veniot

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Aug 4, 2020, 11:26:15 AM8/4/20
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Man, that is such an awesome read.  If I were rich and had some regular publication ("Intertwingularity Digest?")  for some association  ("The Association of Non-Linear Thinkers?"), this is the kind of great writing I'd want to see in there.

Although I'm focused on this particular comment, the same goes for this entire thread and so much great thinking/writing in so many other threads by all of you folk.  I really enjoy this group,.  It has "Association of Non-Linear Thinkers" written all over it !

(It doesn't matter to me much that flattery has never really gotten me anywhere.  The least I can do is show some serious appreciation.)

Cheers, best regards, and keep 'em coming!

loga...@gmail.com

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Aug 4, 2020, 11:57:38 AM8/4/20
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Thank you all! Indeed, as a newcomer to all of this, I am finding myself trying to strike the right balance between structure and non-structure. I think my urge to find a technical notetaking solution is simply due to the way I've been taught to....think since elementary school (e.g, here is a topic, here is a subtopic, here is a sub-subtopic, and they all fall under the domain of the topic, and you must not only memorize the content but also the hierarchy). My only concern is with regards to notes getting lost. As in, I don't want to write a random musing down and have it disappear into wiki oblivion. But, as you said, there are built-in features - tags, for example - that can prevent this from happening. I will continue to explore and optimize. 

clutterstack

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Aug 4, 2020, 1:02:19 PM8/4/20
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I agree with the point @bimlas made earlier, that you don't need a tricked-out TW to get going.

In fact, just structured titles and the stock TW search bar are pretty powerful. In the stone age I started to collect recipes in my main TW, using ":P" at the start of the title. That meant they were listed together in the sidebar, and that I could start typing in the sidebar search and all the recipes would appear in the dropdown.

TiddlyWiki doesn't enforce a system (tags, links, custom fields, etc). At this point, just about any system you could think of for structuring and viewing your data could be implemented using built-in filter operators, macros, and widgets. Not to mention community plugins and editions.

You can start adding tiddlers right away, then get fancier when you truly have the time...copy the New Journal button (https://tiddlywiki.com/#Making%20a%20custom%20journal%20button) and get it to add a tiddler with a predetermined tag (or custom field value)...set a default tiddler with some filtered lists showing tiddlers with your chosen tags (or field values), to get them in front of you when you open your TW...build from there.

It's fascinating, though, and it's easy to spend a lot of time on it.

Cheers,
Chris

bimlas

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Aug 21, 2020, 8:07:49 AM8/21/20
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Sorry to fill this thread with my ideas, but I feel like they fit the title of the topic.

I think on the one hand I understood how the concept of "hashtag" came into being, on the other hand I found a (I think) better use for it.

I want to group the recipes to see their properties in a list, e.g. that if I look at the list of pasta foods, I want to know if that food also contains sour cream.

The advantage of tags and fields is that you can easily group notes with them, so it's easy to filter recipes by ingredients field (this can include, for example, "cheese" and "pasta"). Notes can be grouped dynamically (although I am against the paper-based Zettelkasten), so I can create a view where foods are grouped by main ingredient (pasta dishes) and can be converted at the touch of a button to be grouped by additive (cheese dishes) .

Thinking of Index notes and Link-based navigation, this is harder to accomplish than with fields: if I want to link to pizza, the pasta note index note should have a "cheese dishes" category, and the cheese food index should have a "pasta dishes" category to easily I can find it no matter where I start my search. This information is a duplication because we are talking about the same food (pizza), but depending on the view, I categorize it into several categories (in both cases it is the "cheese" and "pasta" categories, only the "parent category" is different). The solution is to have only one topic in an index without subcategories: pasta dishes should be just a simple list, there should be no "cheese" category in it, just as there should be no "pasta" category in cheese dishes. If I want to know about pasta dishes with cheese, I can only get it by query.

One solution is for a note about a particular food (pizza) to link to the "properties" that are true to it (for "Cheese" and "Pasta" notes), so index notes are built based on backlinks, you don't have to list yourself them in each related index. This way I can find out which note has a link to both: I can either use the "[[Pasta]backlinks[]] ..." filter, or if the note title is like an API method, just "[[Pasta]] [[Cheese]]" text.

The problem with this is that I don’t want to disfigure useful backlinks with links that only use the ingredient at the mention level (any cheese dish would link to the “Cheese” note, though only to indicate that this ingredient needs to be added as well, but the note is not really about the cheese itself). In this respect, it would be worthwhile to create "property notes" that would only be used in this respect, e.g. "§Cheese" and "§Pasta": their backlinks are guaranteed to contain only notes that "use" that property.

If I guess correctly, I now understood how the concept of the hashtag could have come into being ... o_O There is a clear identifier in the text ("§Cheese"), on which I only get notes where this identifier is also included, so with this I group the notes by an identifier according to some aspect. The advantage of this kind of "tagging" is that there is no duplication of information: if I used real tags (eg TiddlyWiki tags field), on the one hand I would have to add the tags corresponding to the components to the notes, on the other hand they would be in the text (where I describe the recipe itself). Instead, if I use "special links" as a tag, I only need to use it once, yet I can interpret the links as a tag. Eg the recipe for pizza:

* Frozen [[§Pasta]]
* 1/4 kg [[§Cheese]]
* ...

TW Tones

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Aug 21, 2020, 10:58:35 PM8/21/20
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Bimlas,

With related thinking I think because we have links and tags we sometime forget any standard implemented text can subsequently be searched and at a minimum list tiddler containing that string eg §Pasta #pasta whether that string is a link, backlink or "naked". With the search highlighter and freelinks plugins this is enhanced even further.

I am currently working on a tool called "advanced search indicators". It monitors the search string entered and responds according to a range of facts about the search string, like if it detects a system tiddler exists it lets you open them with a click, if it is also a tag it provides a tag pill to review it's members, View/edit, clone, open in new window and a lot more become one click away. basically to make a lot of things come alive for tiddlywiki it all depends on what is searchable.

My only piece to finish it is to determine if the search string is a prefix or a suffix to tiddlers to provide a click to list tiddlers so prefixed/suffixed, so almost finished. Although I am trying to automate the generation of a demo site for each of my project(s).

It would be easy to detect the search string starting with # and thus search for "hash tags", a view template that lists and links any hashtags found in a tiddler and more would extend hash tagging functionality. With my search indicator solution you don't need to touch the standard and advanced search mechanisms. This will allow you to choose [[#tagname]] #tagname #[[tagname even !#[[tagname]] and other forms (`<<# tagname>> {{||tagname}}` so as an author you can ask how you want that hash tag treated. This is the advantage of coding a solution once removed from the standard and advanced search process. this is all about the conventions you use and the tools that help implement them.

By the way how do you enter § from the keyboard?

In closing the relink plugin now makes a big difference to this kind of text convention because you can keep such strings up to date on changes.

The sky is not even the limit in tiddlywiki.

Regards
Tones

TiddlyTweeter

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Aug 22, 2020, 1:14:23 AM8/22/20
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Ciao Bimlas


bimlas wrote:
Sorry to fill this thread with my ideas, but I feel like they fit the title of the topic.

Developing an explicit overview of taggery & linking for TW using examples is a very good idea! 

I think on the one hand I understood how the concept of "hashtag" came into being, on the other hand I found a (I think) better use for it.

The widespread use of hashtaggery in social media (Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Linkedin, Telegram etc) emerged first on Twitter in 2007.

At first the experiments using hashtags were met with skepticism. Partly because the simple idea that any of your "content" text AS your "label" identifiers kinda broke some conventions in writing. But hashtags quickly caught on and are a very elegant, compact and are non-duplicating (of fields). Easy to maintain in simple editing. Can support as few or as many as needed. Can be totally part of text flow or just listed in content.

I like them. For many, many use cases they are perfectly good and easy and require no special fields creating or maintaining.

The one thing that is sometimes an issue is that using hashtags in content text won't always work well for the reader. What I mean is that hashtaggery is both a tagging system AND a recent "writing convention". For many academic texts, for instance, it won't work as it breaks their "writers style manuals".
 
I want to group the recipes to see their properties in a list, e.g. that if I look at the list of pasta foods, I want to know if that food also contains sour cream.

Right. Its a good example of leveraging hashtags for TW alongside other fields.

Just FYI the Twitter method of using hashtags makes them ...
  • case insensitive (both #Buddha & #buddha work the same)
  • drop irrelevant punctuation to enable full text context integration (e.g. "At that time #Buddha's interest was in ..." is treated as #buddha) 
Best wishes
TT

TiddlyTweeter

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Aug 22, 2020, 6:24:32 AM8/22/20
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I wish we could offer full showcases. They would really help folk like you hone your aims with TW. It is an obvious weakness of how TW collectively evolved that we tend to underplay showing finished works. There is no central place that shows the full range of what you can do.

Its coming slowly. With the growth of interest in TW recently I think that pushes it along a bit.

Tip: for now: just keep asking :-). The community here are, on the whole, very nice responders.

Best wishes
TT

bimlas

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Aug 24, 2020, 5:15:06 AM8/24/20
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I further developed the previously written "hashtag link" idea into a "metadata link".

It is a good idea to group hashtag links by category so that you don’t have to browse a long list of all tags when, for example, you only want to see a list of food ingredients. We can solve this with the conventional "[[#component: Cheese]]" form, which also solves the notation of metadata and field values. By opening the link and viewing its backlinks, you can get notes that have the same "property".

Query compared to fields:
  • List of properties
    • Field: [all[tiddlers]fields[]]
    • Metadata link: [all[tiddlers]links[]prefix[#]splitbefore[:]]
  • List of values for the "name" property
    • Field: [all[tiddlers]get[name]]
    • Metadata link: [all[tiddlers]links[]removeprefix[#name:]]
  • List of notes where "name: Core"
    • Field: [all[tiddlers]field:name[Core]]
    • Metadata link: [[#name: Core]backlinks[]]
Usage compared to fields:
  • Without writing a filter expression, you can get notes with the same property by viewing only the backlinks
  • Metadata is also part of the text, so there will be no duplication
    • For example, if we label the ingredients in the fields of a recipe so that we can filter them, they should also be included in the text because of the amount required
  • A full text search will also find the values
    • This can be a disadvantage at times, for example if your goal is to store "hidden" data independently of the text
    • If we create a search tab that lists missing tiddlers, we can also search for properties directly
  • We can refer to a specific value
    • For example, in TiddlyWiki we can't reference the "type: application/pdf" field value to get a list of PDF files, but if we use the "[[#type: application/pdf]]" link notation, we can link to the specific "field value"
  • Different values ​​for the same category can be specified with different links
    • Multiple values ​​can be specified in a field, but it is not always clear that a field can contain only one value or a title list.
  • Metadata links can only be placed in text notes, we cannot add them to binaries (eg PDF)
  • Text formatting options (such as in all Operator fields) are determined by the text formatting options of the links, as this is actually just a link
  • It only fits to the surrounding text if the link text differs from the target of the link (eg "0.2 kg [[cheese|#ingredient: Cheese]]")
  • They can also be listed at the beginning of a tiddler as a file header
Example usage:

Recipe

* 0.2 kg [[cheese|#ingredient: Cheese]]
* 0.5 kg [[ground beef|#ingredient: Beef]]

Be sure to use [[olive oil|#ingredient: Olive oil]]!

Music

[[# category: Music]]

* [[#author: Audeka]]
* [[#author: Rawtekk]]
* [[#album: Here's to them]]

... YouTube embed video ...

I created a ViewTemplate where we can view and filter the properties in a table, just click on the links to search for more similar notes or open a tiddler in edit mode to view the original content: https://bimlas.gitlab.io/demo/tw5/property-comparison.html

s.kaczmarek

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Sep 1, 2020, 6:37:29 AM9/1/20
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I came through this at the beginning of this year, when I started to use tiddlywiki. The method that really opened my eyes is Zettelcasten. I implemented it and it is the most natural method of note taking that I found so far. I also use it to document literally every aspect of my life.

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bimlas

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Sep 1, 2020, 6:44:38 AM9/1/20
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I see more and more signs that the TiddlyWiki community is approaching Zettelkasten and similar note-taking methodologies, which is very positive for me! I have been feeling more effective since I started applying these principles. Before, I just collected the notes, but I didn’t use them for anything other than recalling the forgotten knowledge. Ever since my Zettelkasten-like note-taking habits are starting to take shape, I’ve been thinking about notes and it’s very impressive: I find gaps more easily, I’m happy to research the details of a particular topic, so I do what I like to do.

Charlie Veniot

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Sep 1, 2020, 11:21:48 AM9/1/20
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TiddlyWiki really is an amazing thing, eh?

Fyi, here are my on-going TiddlyWiki-based projects:
All of these are about major interest in the topics themselves, but also playgrounds to fully explore TiddlyWiki (FUN!) and apply this "Intertwingularity Mapping" process for writing and organizing any kind of information (so that I can simultaneously figure out how to thoroughly describe that process.)
  • I find everything interesting.  Too many interests, not enough hours in a day ...

BTW / aside:
  • All information, to me, is complex: just when we think a topic is simple, we discover all sorts of intertwingled bits: new interconnections between existing information fragments, new information fragments within the topic and related to other topics, new information just by aggregating bits in different ways (re-purposing things in a reduce/reuse/recycle and/or MacGyver-ing mindset), etc. etc. etc.
  • "Intertwingularity Mapping" is something I've been doing for the last 15-ish years really, but it only dawned on me about two years ago that I had a custom and organically created process going on (to write and organize information/knowledge/documentation/anything), and something within the last two years I christened "Intertwingularity Mapping" (and applying that process to anything also calling "Intertwingularity Slicing'n Dicing")
Cheers (and thanks again to all for the awesome content in all of these threads;  what great stuff) !

bimlas

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Sep 19, 2020, 3:02:26 PM9/19/20
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