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Re. Re. Paleo-etymology (Final 400)

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Daud Deden

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Oct 14, 2022, 1:26:07 AM10/14/22
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Not sure, I think there are 4 Paleo-etymology threads of about 1,000 posts.
I aim to add 400 more posts here, total of about 6,000 posts & comments.

Daud Deden

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Oct 14, 2022, 7:08:17 AM10/14/22
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Cont'd from lace tlaca tlapa

rope (n.)
Middle English rop, from Old English rap "strong, heavy cord of considerable thickness," from Proto-Germanic *raipaz (source also of Old Norse reip, West Frisian reap, Middle Dutch, Dutch reep "rope," Old Frisian silrap "shoe-thong," Gothic skauda-raip "shoe-lace," Old High German, German reif "ring, hoop"). Technically, only cordage above one inch in circumference and below 10 (bigger-around than that is a cable). Nautical use varies. Finnish raippa "hoop, rope, twig" is a Germanic loan-word.

It is attested by early 14c. as "a noose, a snare".

(xyuambua)tlachyah trace trap rap tali
---

cord (n.)
c. 1300, corde, "a string or small rope composed of several strands twisted or woven together; bowstring, hangman's rope," from Old French corde "rope, string, twist, cord," from Latin chorda "string of a musical instrument, cat-gut," from Greek khorde "string, catgut, chord, cord," from PIE root *ghere- "intestine".

Coiled
1610s, "to wind, gather into rings one above the other" (trans.), from French coillir "to gather, pick," from Latin colligere "to gather together" from assimilated form of com "together" (see co-) + legere "to gather," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather." Intransitive sense "to form rings or spirals

Daud Deden

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Oct 14, 2022, 9:11:45 AM10/14/22
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(elicit ex + licire lacere)

How did laz/laq/lash/tlaca/tali exchange to lap/tlapa/w.rap/raipaz/rope?
Laqz > lapzh > rapaiz > rope?
-tlachyah > rapia? Unresolved.

> lace (n.)
> early 13c., laz, "cord made of braided or interwoven strands of silk, etc.," from Old French laz "a net, noose, string, cord, tie, ribbon, or snare" (Modern French lacs), from Vulgar Latin *lacium, from Latin laqueum (nominative laqueus) "a noose, a snare" (source also of Italian laccio, Spanish lazo, English lasso), a trapping and hunting term, probably from Italic base *laq- "to ensnare" (compare Latin lacere "to entice").
>
> Later also "net, noose, snare" (c. 1300); and "piece of cord used to draw together the edges of slits or openings in an article of clothing" (late 14c., as preserved in shoelace). In Middle English it mostly had the sense "cord, thread," especially for tying or binding. It was used of fishing lines and perhaps the gallows rope, crossbeams in architecture, and the net Vulcan used to catch Venus in adultery.
>
> Lash leash let (go)? Rete/net leak? Knot? Light? laquer? Lacks? Lox? loosen
> Tlaca tlapa drape tape track/trek/trace/lace drag.net
Release lease relate? Latch, lock? tendon ligament drawstring
Tali @Mly: rope, string, lace
(xyuambua)TLACHYAh

Daud Deden

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Oct 15, 2022, 12:47:22 AM10/15/22
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On Friday, October 14, 2022 at 9:11:45 AM UTC-4, Daud Deden wrote:
> (elicit ex + licire lacere)

Elicit (v.)
"to draw out, bring forth or to light," 1640s, from Latin elicitus, past participle of elicere "draw out, draw forth," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -licere, combining form of lacere "to entice, lure, deceive" (related to laqueus "noose, snare;" see lace (n.))

Explicit (adj.)
1610s, "open to the understanding, not obscure or ambiguous," from French explicite, from Latin explicitus "unobstructed," variant past participle of explicare "unfold, unroll, unravel, explain," from ex "out" (see ex-) + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait"

Oddly, elicit, explicit and illicit are all used in references to sex, as is licentiousness.

-

Daud Deden

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Oct 15, 2022, 10:59:49 AM10/15/22
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-
Explicit
Implicit imply ply poly play prow plow pluvial umbel embellish
explyn explain expel born buang buah buat
xyuambuatlachyah uambuatlay wombelle embowel bowl-nest

--

Daud Deden

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Oct 15, 2022, 4:42:18 PM10/15/22
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Are there any words in any language spoken in Taiwan that may derive from now-extinct indigenous aboriginal people?

ABSTRACT
Taiwan is known as the homeland of the Austronesian-speaking groups, yet other populations already had lived here since the Pleistocene. Conventional notions have postulated that the Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers were replaced or absorbed into the Neolithic Austronesian farming communities. Yet, some evidence has indicated that sparse numbers of non-Austronesian individuals continued to live in the remote mountains as late as the 1800s. The cranial morphometric study of human skeletal remains unearthed from the Xiaoma Caves in eastern Taiwan, for the first time, validates the prior existence of small stature hunter-gatherers 6000 years ago in the preceramic phase. This female individual shared remarkable cranial affinities and small stature characteristics with the Indigenous Southeast Asians, particularly the Negritos in northern Luzon. This study solves the several-hundred-years-old mysteries of ‘little black people’ legends in Formosan Austronesian tribes and brings insights into the broader prehistory of Southeast Asia.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00438243.2022.2121315

Ross Clark

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Oct 15, 2022, 8:17:58 PM10/15/22
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It's perfectly possible. In fact, there could be Proto-Austronesian
words which have that origin. Identifying them is another matter.
I don't know of anybody who has claimed to do so.

In the Philippines, where there are still physically Negrito populations
(though they speak Austronesian languages), I think Laurie Reid has
claimed to find some "Negrito vocabulary". (It's a little like the
arguments about "Pygmy vocabulary" in Africa.)

L.A.Reid, Possible non-Austronesian lexical elements in Philippine
Negrito languages. Oceanic Linguistics 33:37-72 (1994).

Daud Deden

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Oct 15, 2022, 11:14:19 PM10/15/22
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Thanks, interesting. Isn't Austronesian closest related to Tai-Kradai, both from southern China (or perhaps the now submerged land between China and Taiwan)?
Philippine negritos eg. Mambawa have Denisovan admixture, as do Papuans and Australian aboriginals, while Malayan and Andaman aborigines do not.
I think the original Jomon in southern Japan were negritos, who mixed heavily with later Ainu and then still later Korean migrants.
I'll seek Reid's article.

Ruud Harmsen

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Oct 16, 2022, 3:12:10 AM10/16/22
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Sat, 15 Oct 2022 20:14:18 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
<daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:

>> L.A.Reid, Possible non-Austronesian lexical elements in Philippine
>> Negrito languages. Oceanic Linguistics 33:37-72 (1994).
>
>Thanks, interesting. Isn't Austronesian closest related to Tai-Kradai, both from southern China (or perhaps the now submerged land between China and Taiwan)?
>Philippine negritos eg. Mambawa have Denisovan admixture, as do Papuans and Australian aboriginals, while Malayan and Andaman aborigines do not.
>I think the original Jomon in southern Japan were negritos, who mixed heavily with later Ainu and then still later Korean migrants.
>I'll seek Reid's article.

So now, in these non directly linguistic matters, you do accept
serious mainstream science, and you do not make up your own
fantasy research, as you do do for etymology? Why? Why this
difference? I sincerely don't understand.
--
Ruud Harmsen, http://rudhar.com

Ruud Harmsen

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Oct 16, 2022, 3:46:32 PM10/16/22
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Sat, 15 Oct 2022 20:14:18 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
<daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:
>Thanks, interesting. Isn't Austronesian closest related to
>Tai-Kradai, both from southern China

You routinely ignore relatedness of languages, and you deny the
relevance of it. So I refuse to answer this question, even if I knew
anything about the subject, which I do not. See Wikipedia.

Daud Deden

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Oct 16, 2022, 8:40:19 PM10/16/22
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Errata: Mamanwa not mambawa. Tai-Kadai not Tai-Kradai.

Daud Deden

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Oct 16, 2022, 8:42:50 PM10/16/22
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We know you don't understand, you consistently prove that.

Daud Deden

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Oct 16, 2022, 8:44:07 PM10/16/22
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There is one human language, there are many dialects, Dutch is an example.

Daud Deden

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Oct 16, 2022, 10:15:35 PM10/16/22
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*pā-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to protect, feed."

It forms all or part of: antipasto; appanage; bannock; bezoar; companion; company; feed; fodder; food; forage; foray; foster; fur; furrier; impanate; pabulum; panatela; panic (n.2) "type of grass;" pannier; panocha; pantry; pastern; pastor; pasture; pester; repast; satrap.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek pateisthai "to feed;" Latin pabulum "food, fodder," panis "bread," pasci "to feed," pascare "to graze, pasture, feed," pastor "shepherd," literally "feeder;" Avestan pitu- "food;" Old Church Slavonic pasti "feed cattle, pasture;" Russian pishcha "food;" Old English foda, Gothic fodeins "food, nourishment

Company xyuambuatlay

Daud Deden

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Oct 18, 2022, 7:29:53 PM10/18/22
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On Saturday, October 15, 2022 at 8:17:58 PM UTC-4, benl...@ihug.co.nz wrote:
http://dispatchesfromturtleisland.blogspot.com/2022/10/paleo-formosans.html?m=1
Andrew comes up with a few connections.

Daud Deden

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Oct 18, 2022, 7:36:07 PM10/18/22
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Hominoids
Great apes have 24 pair chromosomes, humans have 23. When did this split occur? Claims reach from 13ma to .9ma, but generally consensus is about 5ma, human and chimp divergence. This new computation indicates that early Homo erectus had ape-like chromosome count of 24 pairs, then mutated just before neanderthals and denisovans split off.
-

HSA2 fusion 23 paired chrom. Homo, 24 in great apes
BMC Genomics volume 23, Article number: 616 (2022)

Abstract
Background
The reduction of the chromosome number from 48 in the Great Apes to 46 in modern humans is thought to result from the end-to-end fusion of two ancestral non-human primate chromosomes forming the human chromosome 2 (HSA2). Genomic signatures of this event are the presence of inverted telomeric repeats at the HSA2 fusion site and a block of degenerate satellite sequences that mark the remnants of the ancestral centromere. It has been estimated that this fusion arose up to 4.5 million years ago (Mya).

Results
We have developed an enhanced algorithm for the detection and efficient counting of the locally over-represented weak-to-strong (AT to GC) substitutions. By analyzing the enrichment of these substitutions around the fusion site of HSA2 we estimated its formation time at 0.9 Mya with a 95% confidence interval of 0.4-1.5 Mya. Additionally, based on the statistics derived from our algorithm, we have reconstructed the evolutionary distances among the Great Apes (Hominoidea).

Conclusions
Our results shed light on the HSA2 fusion formation and provide a novel computational alternative for the estimation of the speciation chronology

https://bmcgenomics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12864-022-08828-7

ex falso quodlibet

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Oct 18, 2022, 9:09:35 PM10/18/22
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On Friday, October 14, 2022 at 12:26:07 AM UTC-5, daud....@gmail.com wrote:
> Not sure, I think there are 4 Paleo-etymology threads of about 1,000 posts.
> I aim to add 400 more posts here, total of about 6,000 posts & comments.
This is just a test

Daud Deden

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Oct 20, 2022, 2:07:27 AM10/20/22
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The mysterious and enigmatic "Ksar Draa", about fifty kilometers from the red city of Timimoun, in the middle of the Algerian Sahara.
(Ksar in Berber or Arabic means fortified village or fort).

This ksar remains a historical enigma.
Built in the middle of an ocean of sand dunes, in the middle of nowhere, it has never revealed its secrets.
Some Algerian archaeologists and historians have looked into its history, as have many foreign archaeologists, but its stones and soil have remained silent.

Double-walled tall stone circular crenulated fortress / caravanserai far from coast

Ksar, ksour plural @Berber/Arabic related to castle, perhaps to kota @ Mly, Khotan fort

Draa is a watershed in Morocco's Atlas mountains where the relic Dades trout live, but I don't know the meaning, possibly drain, draw (hydrau?).

https://www.archeotravelers.com/en/2020/11/06/the-mysterious-ksar-of-draa-in-timimoun/

Ruud Harmsen

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Oct 20, 2022, 9:28:01 AM10/20/22
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Wed, 19 Oct 2022 23:07:26 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
<daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:

>The mysterious and enigmatic "Ksar Draa", about fifty kilometers from the red city of Timimoun, in the middle of the Algerian Sahara.
>(Ksar in Berber or Arabic means fortified village or fort).

You mean qaSar, a totally different and unrelated word:
https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ksar Look at how it is written in
Arabic.

Reflexes of it are seem in numerous geographical names like Alcázar in
Spanish, and e.g. Alcácer do Sal (the "Salt Castle") in Portugal.

>This ksar remains a historical enigma.
>Built in the middle of an ocean of sand dunes, in the middle of nowhere, it has never revealed its secrets.
>Some Algerian archaeologists and historians have looked into its history, as have many foreign archaeologists, but its stones and soil have remained silent.

Daud Deden

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Oct 21, 2022, 12:47:56 AM10/21/22
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On Thursday, October 20, 2022 at 9:28:01 AM UTC-4, Ruud Harmsen wrote:
> Wed, 19 Oct 2022 23:07:26 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
> <daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:
> >The mysterious and enigmatic "Ksar Draa", about fifty kilometers from the red city of Timimoun, in the middle of the Algerian Sahara.
> >(Ksar in Berber or Arabic means fortified village or fort).

citadel (n.)
"fortress commanding a city," 1580s, from French citadelle (15c.), from Italian cittadella, diminutive of Old Italian cittade "city" (Modern Italian citta), from Latin civitatem (nominative civitas; also source of Portuguese citadella, Spanish ciuadela; see city).

> You mean qaSar, a totally different and unrelated word:

I pasted the defn. Ksar, qsar from that site.

Daud Deden

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Oct 21, 2022, 5:38:00 AM10/21/22
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On Friday, October 21, 2022 at 12:47:56 AM UTC-4, Daud Deden wrote:
> On Thursday, October 20, 2022 at 9:28:01 AM UTC-4, Ruud Harmsen wrote:
> > Wed, 19 Oct 2022 23:07:26 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
> > <daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:
> > >The mysterious and enigmatic "Ksar Draa", about fifty kilometers from the red city of Timimoun, in the middle of the Algerian Sahara.
> > >(Ksar in Berber or Arabic means fortified village or fort).
> citadel (n.)
> "fortress commanding a city," 1580s, from French citadelle (15c.), from Italian cittadella, diminutive of Old Italian cittade "city" (Modern Italian citta), from Latin civitatem (nominative civitas; also source of Portuguese citadella, Spanish ciuadela; see city).

It bears comparing cita to kota, both modern words meaning 'defended populated concentrations' cf canada (containment of people (maybe surrounded by a palisade (tall fence of sharp-tipped poles))) which links back to canastros/cannister and kantong/kampong @ Mly.

Peter T. Daniels

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Oct 21, 2022, 8:54:09 AM10/21/22
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On Friday, October 21, 2022 at 12:47:56 AM UTC-4, daud....@gmail.com wrote:
> On Thursday, October 20, 2022 at 9:28:01 AM UTC-4, Ruud Harmsen wrote:
> > Wed, 19 Oct 2022 23:07:26 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
> > <daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:

> > >The mysterious and enigmatic "Ksar Draa", about fifty kilometers from the red city of Timimoun, in the middle of the Algerian Sahara.
> > >(Ksar in Berber or Arabic means fortified village or fort).
>
> citadel (n.)
> "fortress commanding a city," 1580s, from French citadelle (15c.), from Italian cittadella, diminutive of Old Italian cittade "city" (Modern Italian citta), from Latin civitatem (nominative civitas; also source of Portuguese citadella, Spanish ciuadela; see city).
> > You mean qaSar, a totally different and unrelated word:
>
> I pasted the defn. Ksar, qsar from that site.

k and q are NOT interchangeable in Arabic.

Daud Deden

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Oct 21, 2022, 3:02:54 PM10/21/22
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No, but the site wrote them as if they are (ksar, qsar). Perhaps in Berber.

Ruud Harmsen

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Oct 22, 2022, 5:10:53 AM10/22/22
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Fri, 21 Oct 2022 12:02:53 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
<daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:

>On Friday, October 21, 2022 at 8:54:09 AM UTC-4, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>> On Friday, October 21, 2022 at 12:47:56 AM UTC-4, daud....@gmail.com wrote:
>> > On Thursday, October 20, 2022 at 9:28:01 AM UTC-4, Ruud Harmsen wrote:
>> > > Wed, 19 Oct 2022 23:07:26 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
>> > > <daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:
>>
>> > > >The mysterious and enigmatic "Ksar Draa", about fifty kilometers from the red city of Timimoun, in the middle of the Algerian Sahara.
>> > > >(Ksar in Berber or Arabic means fortified village or fort).
>> >
>> > citadel (n.)
>> > "fortress commanding a city," 1580s, from French citadelle (15c.), from Italian cittadella, diminutive of Old Italian cittade "city" (Modern Italian citta), from Latin civitatem (nominative civitas; also source of Portuguese citadella, Spanish ciuadela; see city).
>> > > You mean qaSar, a totally different and unrelated word:
>> >
>> > I pasted the defn. Ksar, qsar from that site.
>> k and q are NOT interchangeable in Arabic.
>
>No, but the site wrote them as if they are (ksar, qsar). Perhaps in Berber.

The Berber is ALSO written and transcribed for you in the Wikipedia
article I earled you to.

>> > > https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ksar Look at how it is written in
>> > > Arabic.

Daud Deden

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Oct 22, 2022, 7:47:17 AM10/22/22
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On Saturday, October 22, 2022 at 5:10:53 AM UTC-4, Ruud Harmsen wrote:
> Fri, 21 Oct 2022 12:02:53 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
> <daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:
>
> >On Friday, October 21, 2022 at 8:54:09 AM UTC-4, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> >> On Friday, October 21, 2022 at 12:47:56 AM UTC-4, daud....@gmail.com wrote:
> >> > On Thursday, October 20, 2022 at 9:28:01 AM UTC-4, Ruud Harmsen wrote:
> >> > > Wed, 19 Oct 2022 23:07:26 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
> >> > > <daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:
> >>
> >> > > >The mysterious and enigmatic "Ksar Draa", about fifty kilometers from the red city of Timimoun, in the middle of the Algerian Sahara.
> >> > > >(Ksar in Berber or Arabic means fortified village or fort).
> >> >
> >> > citadel (n.)
> >> > "fortress commanding a city," 1580s, from French citadelle (15c.), from Italian cittadella, diminutive of Old Italian cittade "city" (Modern Italian citta), from Latin civitatem (nominative civitas; also source of Portuguese citadella, Spanish ciuadela; see city).
> >> > > You mean qaSar, a totally different and unrelated word:
That brings up a music group from Paris: https://www.uncut.co.uk/reviews/album/al-qasar-who-are-we-139879/

Qasr @Arb: castle
Casa @Spn: house
Citta citadel ciuadela civitatem khotan kota hut huis hostel hotel

Metaphorically, a city is a campsite stoned, as if on steroids (bigger, beefier, heavier). Still just a shelter, from leaf & twig domeshield.

> >> >
> >> > I pasted the defn. Ksar, qsar from that site.
Some other site, I guess.

> >> k and q are NOT interchangeable in Arabic.
> >
> >No, but the site wrote them as if they are (ksar, qsar). Perhaps in Berber.
> The Berber is ALSO written and transcribed for you in the Wikipedia
> article I earled you to.
Ok, now I see it. Something like ighre.m? ~ iglu/ngualua?
https://dbpedia.org/page/Ksar

Peter T. Daniels

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Oct 22, 2022, 10:50:34 AM10/22/22
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Arab. kalb = dog, qalb = heart

Berber also has both k and q.

Ruud Harmsen

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Oct 22, 2022, 12:07:59 PM10/22/22
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Sat, 22 Oct 2022 04:47:16 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
<daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:

>On Saturday, October 22, 2022 at 5:10:53 AM UTC-4, Ruud Harmsen wrote:
>> Fri, 21 Oct 2022 12:02:53 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
>> <daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:
>>
>> >On Friday, October 21, 2022 at 8:54:09 AM UTC-4, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>> >> On Friday, October 21, 2022 at 12:47:56 AM UTC-4, daud....@gmail.com wrote:
>> >> > On Thursday, October 20, 2022 at 9:28:01 AM UTC-4, Ruud Harmsen wrote:
>> >> > > Wed, 19 Oct 2022 23:07:26 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
>> >> > > <daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:
>> >>
>> >> > > >The mysterious and enigmatic "Ksar Draa", about fifty kilometers from the red city of Timimoun, in the middle of the Algerian Sahara.
>> >> > > >(Ksar in Berber or Arabic means fortified village or fort).
>> >> >
>> >> > citadel (n.)
>> >> > "fortress commanding a city," 1580s, from French citadelle (15c.), from Italian cittadella, diminutive of Old Italian cittade "city" (Modern Italian citta), from Latin civitatem (nominative civitas; also source of Portuguese citadella, Spanish ciuadela; see city).
>> >> > > You mean qaSar, a totally different and unrelated word:
>That brings up a music group from Paris: https://www.uncut.co.uk/reviews/album/al-qasar-who-are-we-139879/
>
>Qasr @Arb: castle
>Casa @Spn: house

The Arabic word, via Aramaic, comes from a Latin source, so it is
actually possible that these two are related.

>Citta citadel ciuadela civitatem khotan kota hut huis hostel hotel

Casa and huis look like they could easily be related. I checked a week
or so ago, and I think they were. Wiktonary knows almost everything.

Ruud Harmsen

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Oct 22, 2022, 12:10:32 PM10/22/22
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Sat, 22 Oct 2022 07:50:32 -0700 (PDT): "Peter T. Daniels"
<gram...@verizon.net> scribeva:
Yes, and qaHqaHa means "to cough". Daud Deden will of course think
these two are related. And they are.

>Berber also has both k and q.
>
>> > > > https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ksar Look at how it is written in
>> > > > Arabic.

wugi

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Oct 22, 2022, 12:39:43 PM10/22/22
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Op 22/10/2022 om 18:07 schreef Ruud Harmsen:
They aren't:
https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=house
https://etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/huis1

--
guido wugi

Daud Deden

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Oct 22, 2022, 12:49:26 PM10/22/22
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Kalb ~ Wolf, whelp, ku(alp/an) kuon
Qalb ~ lub, lobe, leaf ngo-ngo.lu shingle (cf cardio<=> cortex? re. Kupharigolu coracle coverbowl(waterproof)

> Berber also has both k and q.
Ok.

Daud Deden

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Oct 22, 2022, 12:55:41 PM10/22/22
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On Saturday, October 22, 2022 at 12:10:32 PM UTC-4, Ruud Harmsen wrote:
> Sat, 22 Oct 2022 07:50:32 -0700 (PDT): "Peter T. Daniels"
> <gram...@verizon.net> scribeva:
> >On Friday, October 21, 2022 at 3:02:54 PM UTC-4, daud....@gmail.com wrote:
> >> On Friday, October 21, 2022 at 8:54:09 AM UTC-4, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> >> > On Friday, October 21, 2022 at 12:47:56 AM UTC-4, daud....@gmail.com wrote:
> >> > > On Thursday, October 20, 2022 at 9:28:01 AM UTC-4, Ruud Harmsen wrote:
> >> > > > Wed, 19 Oct 2022 23:07:26 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
> >> > > > <daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:
> >
> >> > > > >The mysterious and enigmatic "Ksar Draa", about fifty kilometers from the red city of Timimoun, in the middle of the Algerian Sahara.
> >> > > > >(Ksar in Berber or Arabic means fortified village or fort).
> >> > > citadel (n.)
> >> > > "fortress commanding a city," 1580s, from French citadelle (15c.), from Italian cittadella, diminutive of Old Italian cittade "city" (Modern Italian citta), from Latin civitatem (nominative civitas; also source of Portuguese citadella, Spanish ciuadela; see city).
> >> > > > You mean qaSar, a totally different and unrelated word:
> >> > > I pasted the defn. Ksar, qsar from that site.
> >> > k and q are NOT interchangeable in Arabic.
> >>
> >> No, but the site wrote them as if they are (ksar, qsar). Perhaps in Berber.
> >
> >Arab. kalb = dog, qalb = heart
> Yes, and qaHqaHa means "to cough". Daud Deden will of course think
> these two are related. And they are.

Prettiest arabic word I've seen: qahwa = coffee so floral & symmetrical!
قهوة

Daud Deden

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Oct 22, 2022, 7:58:50 PM10/22/22
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Tete @Azt: dad (dada, daddy)

Ruud Harmsen

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Oct 23, 2022, 3:36:29 AM10/23/22
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Sat, 22 Oct 2022 09:55:39 -0700 (PDT): Daud Deden
<daud....@gmail.com> scribeva:
>On Saturday, October 22, 2022 at 12:10:32 PM UTC-4, Ruud Harmsen wrote:
>> Sat, 22 Oct 2022 07:50:32 -0700 (PDT): "Peter T. Daniels"
>> >Arab. kalb = dog, qalb = heart
>> Yes, and qaHqaHa means "to cough". Daud Deden will of course think
>> these two are related. And they are.
>
>Prettiest arabic word I've seen: qahwa = coffee so floral & symmetrical!

Not the same h, sounds very different. The other one is an
onomatopoeia.

Daud Deden

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Oct 23, 2022, 5:44:20 AM10/23/22
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On Friday, October 14, 2022 at 1:26:07 AM UTC-4, Daud Deden wrote:
> Not sure, I think there are 4 Paleo-etymology threads of about 1,000 posts.
> I aim to add 400 more posts here, total of about 6,000 posts & comments.

we, an army and navy of Stsiugnil
are hunted and gathered here today
in the backwoods of the world's interior
to reconsider the past present and future
communication and community of humanity

?

Daud Deden

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Oct 24, 2022, 9:43:19 AM10/24/22
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issue (n.)
c. 1300, "an exit," from Old French issue "a way out, a going out, exit; final event," from fem. past participle of issir "to go out," from Latin exire "go out, go forth; become public; flow, gush, pour forth" (source also of Italian uscire, Catalan exir), from ex- "out" (see ex-) + ire "to go," from PIE root *ei- "to go.

Daud Deden

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Oct 25, 2022, 4:12:43 AM10/25/22
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On Monday, October 24, 2022 at 9:43:19 AM UTC-4, Daud Deden wrote:
> issue (n.)
> c. 1300, "an exit," from Old French issue "a way out, a going out, exit; final event," from fem. past participle of issir "to go out," from Latin exire "go out, go forth; become public; flow, gush, pour forth" (source also of Italian uscire, Catalan exir), from ex- "out" (see ex-) + ire "to go," from PIE root *ei- "to go.

tissue (n.)
mid-14c., "band or belt of rich material," from Old French tissu "a ribbon, headband, belt of woven material" (c. 1200), noun use of tissu "woven, interlaced," past participle of tistre "to weave," from Latin texere "to weave, to make," from PIE root *teks- "to weave," also "to fabricate." The biological sense is first recorded 1831, from French, introduced c. 1800 by French anatomist Marie-François-Xavier Bichal (1771-1802). Meaning "piece of absorbent paper used as a handkerchief" is from 1929. Tissue-paper is from 1777, supposedly so called because it was made to be placed between tissues to protect them.

Daud Deden

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Oct 25, 2022, 9:04:26 PM10/25/22
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Clarke's three laws

British science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke formulated three adages that are known as Clarke's three laws, of which the third law is the best known and most widely cited. They are part of his ideas in his extensive writings about the future.[1]

When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.

The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible.

Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

Daud Deden

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Oct 26, 2022, 9:22:08 PM10/26/22
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caravanserai (n.)
1590s, carvanzara, "Eastern inn (with a large central court) catering to caravans," ultimately from Persian karwan-sarai, from karwan (see caravan) + sara'i "palace, mansion; inn," from Iranian base *thraya- "to protect" (from PIE root *tere- (2) "cross over, pass through,

xyua.mbuaTLA(ch)YAh open.pass.through pass/piss/pizzle, buatl bear-birth

Daud Deden

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Oct 27, 2022, 7:39:48 PM10/27/22
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On Thu, 27 Oct 2022 at 19:31, DDeden <daud....@gmail.com> wrote:\

Are these similar words linked to cant? Seem so.
Lean cline climb clamber camber slant glance (off) de.cant scan land(?) scale scar scarf (scroll?) scarp(cliff geol.) carve en.grave scrive scribe scansorial
Skape shape landscape escarpment? Rift scar.ify

> scan (v.)
> late 14c., scannen, "to mark off verse in metric feet, analyze verse according to its meter," from Late Latin scandere "to scan verse," originally, in classical Latin, "to climb, rise, mount" (the connecting notion is of the rising and falling rhythm of poetry), from PIE *skand- "to spring, leap, climb" (source also of Sanskrit skandati "hastens, leaps, jumps;" Greek skandalon "stumbling block;" Middle Irish sescaind "he sprang, jumped," sceinm "a bound, jump").
>
> English lost the classical -d- probably by confusion with suffix -ed (compare lawn (n.1)). Intransitive meaning "follow or agree with the rules of meter" is by 1857. The sense of "look at point by point, examine minutely (as one does when counting metrical feet in poetry)" is recorded by 1540s. New technology brought the meaning "systematically pass over with a scanner," especially to convert into a sequence of signals (1928). The (opposite) sense of "look over quickly, skim" is attested by 1926.
> Cf ascent descent scale lean/cline/climb?
> Naik @Mly: asc. turun desc.
> Cant.or slant
>
> cant (n.1)
> "pretentious or insincere talk, ostentatious conventionality in speech," 1709. The earliest use is as a slang word for "the whining speech of beggars asking for alms" (1640s), from the verb in this sense (1560s), from Old North French canter (Old French chanter) "to sing, chant," from Latin cantare, frequentative of canere "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing"
>
> cant (n.2)
> slope, slant," late 14c., first in Scottish writing and apparently meaning "edge, brink," a word of uncertain origin. "words identical in form and corresponding in sense are found in many languages, Teutonic, Slavonic, Romanic, Celtic" [OED]. It was rare in English before c. 1600. Meaning "slope, slanting or tilting position" is from 1847
>
> Linked to lifting/lowering domeshield, tilt on edge, ground-hinged leverage, cant-hook
> https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cant_hook originally a spearbutt, then tomahawk?, then canthook or peavy for tilting logs to cut
>
> Perhaps via Old North French cant "corner" (itself perhaps via Middle Low German kante or Middle Dutch kant), from Vulgar Latin *canthus, from Latin cantus "iron tire of a wheel," which is possibly from a Celtic word meaning "rim of wheel, edge, brim" (compare Welsh cant "bordering of a circle, tire, edge," Breton cant "circle"). The ultimate connections of these are uncertain. Greek kanthos "corner of the eye," and Russian kutu "corner" sometimes are suggested, but there are difficulties (see Beekes)

Cantilever
Decant: decant (v.)
1630s, "pour off gently the clear liquid from a solution by tipping the vessel," originally an alchemical term, from French décanter, perhaps from Medieval Latin decanthare "to pour from the edge of a vessel," from de- "off, away" (see de-) + Medieval Latin canthus "corner, lip of a jug," from Latin cantus, canthus "iron rim around a carriage wheel" (see cant (n.2)). Related: Decanted

DD ~ David ~ Da'ud ~ Diode ~ ∆^¥°∆

Ross Clark

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Oct 28, 2022, 1:00:34 AM10/28/22
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On 28/10/2022 12:39 p.m., Daud Deden wrote:
> On Thu, 27 Oct 2022 at 19:31, DDeden <daud....@gmail.com> wrote:\
>
> Are these similar words linked to cant? Seem so.

Seem not, to me. Not all of them, anyway

cant, decant < Lat < Celtic *kantho < *kemb 'bend, turn'

cantilever (orign unknown)

lean, cline < *klei ‘lean’

slant (no cognates beyond English)

glance (off) < Lat glacies 'ice' < *gel 'cold'

climb, clamber ? < **gel? ‘grip’

camber < Lat camurus 'curved inwards'

scan, scansorial < *skand 'leap, climb'

land < *lendh 'open land'

This leaves us with a bunch that come from roots meaning 'cut, scratch' etc.

shape, landscape < *(s)kep cut, scrape, hack
(don't know what "Skape" is)

rift *rei 'scratch, tear, cut'

The following have a little more in common, namely velar stop + liquid
in the root:

carve < *gerbh 'scratch'

engrave < *ghrebh 'dig, bury, scratch'

scale < *(s)kel 'cut'


scarp(cliff geol.), escarpment, scarf [wood], scar [geol] < *(s)ker 'cut'

And these from extensions of *(s)ker:

scribe < *skrībh < *sker
(don't know what "scrive" is)

scroll < *skreu 'cut, cutting tool' < *sker 'cut'

All the above from Watkins plus a couple of dictionaries.

Daud Deden

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Oct 28, 2022, 8:14:03 AM10/28/22
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Thanks, interesting. These 3 refer to a bound/bounce/reflection/angle/richochet, a bent path, close to decant & skand.

glance (v.)
mid-15c., of weapons, "strike obliquely without giving full impact," a nasalized form of glacen "to graze, strike a glancing blow" (c. 1300), from Old French glacier "to slip, make slippery" (compare Old French glaciere "part of a knight's armor meant to deflect blows"), from glace "ice" (see glacial). Sense of "look quickly" (first recorded 1580s) probably was by influence of Middle English glenten "look askance" (see glint (v.)), which also could account for the -n-.

glint (v.)
1787 (intransitive), from Scottish, where apparently it survived as an alteration of glent, from Middle English glenten "gleam, flash, glisten" (mid-15c.), from a Scandinavian source (compare Norwegian gletta "to look," dialectal Swedish glinta "to shine"), from the group of Germanic *gl- words meaning "smooth; shining; joyous," from PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives referring to bright materials and gold. Reintroduced into literary English by Burns

graze (v.2)
"to touch lightly in passing," c. 1600, perhaps a transferred sense from graze (v.1) via a notion of cropping grass right down to the ground (compare German grasen "to feed on grass," used in military sense in reference to cannonballs that rebound off the ground

Discard land, unless linked to lend (bounce back to owner?)

Perhaps include (via camber?) akimbo and skip (stone on water)

[I thought (land)skape and scrive(ner) were words.]
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Daud Deden

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Oct 29, 2022, 12:19:13 AM10/29/22
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Daud Deden

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Oct 29, 2022, 12:49:19 AM10/29/22
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Daud Deden

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Oct 29, 2022, 1:04:23 PM10/29/22
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OT health

Mimic true smile to feel happy

concept of being able to influence our emotions by simply moving our facial muscles has long been debated by researchers, but until now, no test or theory has been globally agreed upon.

"In this study, we assembled a team of sceptics and a team of believers (called the 'Many Smiles Collaboration') to test a mutually agreed methodology, and what we found was reliable evidence that the physical formation of a smile can produce feelings of happiness."

The study tested three well-known techniques:

1) mimicking facial expressions of actors seen in photos;

2) moving the corners of their mouths to their cheeks using only their facial muscles; and

3) using the 'pen-in-mouth' technique which moves the facial muscles in a simulated smile shape.

"Two out of three of these conditions generated noticeable increases in happiness, providing a compelling argument that human emotions are linked to muscle movements," Dr Marmolejo-Ramos says.

"But as the pen-in-mouth technique didn't achieve the same mood changes (possibly because the simulated mouth shape wasn't as representative of a smile as we thought) we can't say with absolute certainty that one always causes the other.

"Still, the evidence is strong, and knowing that we can somewhat 'fake it 'til we make it', is definitely a reassuring proposal."

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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/10/221027124012.htm

Sugar & sedentary => diabetes 2, obesity,

Daud Deden

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Oct 31, 2022, 12:56:28 AM10/31/22