Yesterday's wind speed in the channel

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xmetman

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Jun 27, 2019, 5:13:01 AM6/27/19
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Not sure if these wind speeds constituted a yellow warning, but I suppose it's busy with holiday makers in the southwest and they weren't taking any risks. 

2019-06-27_100823.jpg




Freddie

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Jun 27, 2019, 5:36:57 AM6/27/19
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There aren't speed thresholds for warnings per se - it's all about impacts (think about holidaymakers with small craft or inflatables).

--
Freddie
Dorrington
Shropshire
115m AMSL
http://www.hosiene.co.uk/weather/
Stats for the month so far: https://www.hosiene.co.uk/weather/statistics/201906JUN.xlsx

xmetman

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Jun 27, 2019, 6:11:33 AM6/27/19
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I understand what you're saying but I think you have got to draw the line somewhere, otherwise the weather - and what it can do - will become as letiguous an area as the risk of climbing a set of ladders is at work, and you'll be issuing warnings for every windy day.

The chances of anyone on a lilo hearing or heeding that warning are slim, and short of them seeing a red flag on the beach they'll still do it.

I can imagine there are plenty of people sailing/canoeing around the lochs and coasts off northwest of Scotland at the moment, but I don't see yellow warnings issued for the likes of them for similar conditions.

I can anticipate your reply - that's because there are tens of thousands of holidaymakers on the beaches of southwest England and only a couple of hundred up here!

Of course the reason they don't bother issuing warnings like that up here, is because whoever's responsible for issuing that warning is assessing the impact it will have, and up here it's small.

The line has already been drawn, and as you say it's not wind speed but the chances of someone losing their life.



Graham Easterling

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Jun 27, 2019, 6:28:14 AM6/27/19
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Not sure if these wind speeds constituted a yellow warning, but I suppose it's busy with holiday makers in the southwest and they weren't taking any risks. 

Yes, I think that's it, using anything inflatable in the water in these conditions would be an accident waiting to happen. As is often the case in an easterly, the strongest gusts tend to be near the north (offshore) coast of Cornwall. So Camborne recorded a stronger gust than even Sevenstones buoy.

The windsock on Sennen beach this morning means no inflatables

No Inflatables.jpg


Feeling very warm again despite the wind. The total lack of Atlantic swell continues.

Graham
Penzance

Freddie

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Jun 27, 2019, 6:29:05 AM6/27/19
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On Thursday, 27 June 2019 11:11:33 UTC+1, xmetman wrote:
I understand what you're saying but I think you have got to draw the line somewhere, otherwise the weather - and what it can do - will become as letiguous an area as the risk of climbing a set of ladders is at work, and you'll be issuing warnings for every windy day.
Yes, I agree.  It's a bit of a minefield assessing impacts.  There's always going to be an impact on somebody for every type of weather (for me today it is pollen and a singed scalp!), so what I think they do is try and assess potential popular activities (summertime leisure pursuits in this instance) and tailor the issue of warnings around that.  A similar windspeed in the winter season would almost certainly not involve issuing a warning.

The chances of anyone on a lilo hearing or heeding that warning are slim, and short of them seeing a red flag on the beach they'll still do it.
The "heeding" bit I agree with, but you would hope that anybody with any sense of self preservation would try and assess the likely environment that they will be operating in.  The "hearing" bit -  it is a lot better than it used to be (putting my head above the parapet there!) but still relies on people actively looking out for their own welfare before engaging in such pursuits.  That is never going to be a given, as we all have differing ideas of risk and differing abilities to seek out and/or accept advice.  As Rag'n'Bone Man says: "You're only human, after all" :-)


I can imagine there are plenty of people sailing/canoeing around the lochs and coasts off northwest of Scotland at the moment, but I don't see yellow warnings issued for the likes of them for similar conditions.

I can anticipate your reply - that's because there are tens of thousands of holidaymakers on the beaches of southwest England and only a couple of hundred up here!

Of course the reason they don't bother issuing warnings like that up here, is because whoever's responsible for issuing that warning is assessing the impact it will have, and up here it's small.
It's probably because such conditions are more usual in northwest Scotland.  I reckon you could get a yellow warning there too - but the speed threshold would be higher.


The line has already been drawn, and as you say it's not wind speed but the chances of someone losing their life.
Spot on, Bruce.
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