Linux Need to set location of cche/tmp directory.

22 views
Skip to first unread message

Boyd Lynn Gerber

unread,
Nov 30, 2022, 1:13:09 PM11/30/22
to Video DownloadHelper Q&A
Hello,

I'm on an openSUSE Leap 15.4 OS using the extension.  I need to set the cache/tmp filer directory.  I have a limited amount of space on my root partition.  I usually change the cache directory to a different location.  Using the plugin files my root file system.  Even trying to do one at a time.  I cannot expand the root file system.  I tried setting a TMP variable.  A configuration option would be appreciated.

Thanks for any suggestions or ideas,

Regards,
-- 
Boyd Gerber <ger...@zenez.com>

Wild Willy

unread,
Nov 30, 2022, 5:31:30 PM11/30/22
to Video Download Helper Google Group
I just ran this script:

SET TEMP=M:\VDH Testing
SET TMP=M:\VDH Testing
"C:\Program Files (x86)\Mozilla Firefox\firefox"

Granted, this is on Windows so I don't know how much of this applies to Linux. You'll
notice I have TWO SET commands. I don't exactly know why but I have both these
environment variables defined on my Windows 7 system. Maybe one of them is standard &
the other is something I did in the mists of antiquity for reasons I of course can't
recall. In any case, in my default environment, these 2 environment variables point to
the same directory on my boot partition. The directory is a couple of levels down under
my C:\Users directory & it is the place VDH normally puts its temporary files.

I ran this command script & Firefox opened just fine. I then went to YouTube & picked
something at random. I used VDH to download the item. While the download was in
progress, a download I targeted to this same VDH Testing directory, the usual 2 temporary
files showed up there. When the download completed, which it did successfully, the 2
temporary files were gone. The downloaded video played just fine in VLC.

Maybe you need to try setting the temporary directory using both spellings of the
environment variable. This depends on what is actually defined in your system. If your
Linux does not have both of these defined, maybe you don't need to set them both. On the
other hand, you might try setting them both as an experiment, just to see if it makes any
difference.

On the other hand (how many hands is that?), since VDH cleans up its temporary files,
perhaps you are too worried about the issue. Or are you really that constrained in your
boot partition that even the existence of some files for only a transitory period is too
much? And if you are that constrained, geez, disk space is awfully cheap these days.
Give yourself a gift for Christmas this year.
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages