Merry thingy to all ye sheddy

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Peter

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Dec 25, 2021, 7:38:24 AM12/25/21
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...and as we've past the solstice, days should be getting longer, if you
believe that sort of thing.

--
Peter
-----

Chris Elvidge

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Dec 25, 2021, 7:58:14 AM12/25/21
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On 25/12/2021 12:38, Peter wrote:
> ...and as we've past the solstice, days should be getting longer, if you
> believe that sort of thing.
>
🎅🏻🎄

--
Chris Elvidge
England

Tim+

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Dec 25, 2021, 9:17:21 AM12/25/21
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Peter <mys...@prune.org.uk> wrote:
> ...and as we've past the solstice, days should be getting longer, if you
> believe that sort of thing.
>

What?? I’ve missed the naked dancing?

Tim

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Please don't feed the trolls

John Williamson

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Dec 25, 2021, 10:13:34 AM12/25/21
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On 25/12/2021 14:17, Tim+ wrote:
> Peter <mys...@prune.org.uk> wrote:
>> ...and as we've past the solstice, days should be getting longer, if you
>> believe that sort of thing.
>>
>
> What?? I’ve missed the naked dancing?
>
That's the *other* solstice...


--
Tciao for Now!

John.

Tim+

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Dec 25, 2021, 10:24:33 AM12/25/21
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Ah, that would explain the frostbite last time.

Ahem A Rivet's Shot

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Dec 25, 2021, 10:30:02 AM12/25/21
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On 25 Dec 2021 14:17:18 GMT
Tim+ <tim.d...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Peter <mys...@prune.org.uk> wrote:
> > ...and as we've past the solstice, days should be getting longer, if
> > you believe that sort of thing.
> >
>
> What?? I’ve missed the naked dancing?

Don't worry it's down for a rerun with you starring, er hang on
...
no sorry I have that wrong it's the ritual sacrifice that's getting
the rerun.

--
Steve O'Hara-Smith
Odds and Ends at http://www.sohara.org/

Tease'n'Seize

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Dec 25, 2021, 11:09:25 AM12/25/21
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Peter wrote:

> days should be getting longer, if you
> believe that sort of thing.

sunrises still getting later for another week or more, thobut </gloom>

Nicholas D. Richards

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Dec 25, 2021, 11:24:16 AM12/25/21
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In article <1250480582.662134611.482...@news.indivi
dual.net>, Tim+ <tim.d...@gmail.com> on Sat, 25 Dec 2021 at 14:17:18
awoke Nicholas from his slumbers and wrote
>Peter <mys...@prune.org.uk> wrote:
>> ...and as we've past the solstice, days should be getting longer, if you
>> believe that sort of thing.
>>
>
>What?? I’ve missed the naked dancing?
>
Good Luck with that, particularly in December.

Anyway my left knee has just started playing up, seriously.
--
0sterc@tcher -

"Où sont les neiges d'antan?"

Peter

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Dec 25, 2021, 12:08:10 PM12/25/21
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Tease'n'Seize <tease-and-seize@invalid> wrote in
news:NrWdncoMt5Ku31r8...@brightview.co.uk:
That's OK, longer in bed in the morning, innit.

--
Peter
-----

Nicholas D. Richards

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Dec 25, 2021, 4:22:48 PM12/25/21
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In article <XnsAE0BAE50E3...@144.76.35.252>, Peter
<mys...@prune.org.uk> on Sat, 25 Dec 2021 at 17:08:09 awoke Nicholas
from his slumbers and wrote
SWMBO did not surface until 1pm.
--
0sterc@tcher -

"Oů sont les neiges d'antan?"

Brian Gaff (Sofa)

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Dec 26, 2021, 5:38:17 AM12/26/21
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Its not a belief its a fact due to the earths tilt. However the earth does
wobble a bit of course so there is a slight drift each time it goes round
the sun.
I often wonder if we will be here again next year, as there are so many
things in the universe which could conspire to end it all before we do so
individually so to speak.


If you believe in God, One wonders if the James Web telescope will be able
to see that entity if it really does see back to the start of the universe.
Brian

--

This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...
bri...@blueyonder.co.uk
Blind user, so no pictures please
Note this Signature is meaningless.!
"Peter" <mys...@prune.org.uk> wrote in message
news:XnsAE0B809389...@144.76.35.252...

Ahem A Rivet's Shot

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Dec 26, 2021, 7:00:02 AM12/26/21
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On Sun, 26 Dec 2021 10:38:15 -0000
"Brian Gaff \(Sofa\)" <bri...@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

> If you believe in God, One wonders if the James Web telescope will be
> able to see that entity if it really does see back to the start of the
> universe.

It'll only get back to a few hundred million years after the big
bnag so it won't get anywhere near seeing the really interesting bits from
the first few minutes.

Richard Robinson

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Dec 26, 2021, 12:07:27 PM12/26/21
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Nicholas D. Richards said:
> In article <1250480582.662134611.482...@news.indivi
> dual.net>, Tim+ <tim.d...@gmail.com> on Sat, 25 Dec 2021 at 14:17:18
> awoke Nicholas from his slumbers and wrote
>>Peter <mys...@prune.org.uk> wrote:
>>> ...and as we've past the solstice, days should be getting longer, if you
>>> believe that sort of thing.

I think I'll tentatively assume it until presented with evidence to the
contrary. For now, anyway.

>>What?? I’ve missed the naked dancing?
>>
> Good Luck with that, particularly in December.
>
> Anyway my left knee has just started playing up, seriously.

Mine does that when people start talking about dancing, too.

--
Richard Robinson
"The whole plan hinged upon the natural curiosity of potatoes" - S. Lem

My email address is at http://qualmograph.org.uk/contact.html

Dennis Davis

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Dec 27, 2021, 3:35:57 AM12/27/21
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In article <1250480582.662134611.482...@news.individual.net>,
Tim+ <tim.d...@gmail.com> wrote:
>Peter <mys...@prune.org.uk> wrote:
>> ...and as we've past the solstice, days should be getting longer,
>> if you believe that sort of thing.
>
>What?? I’ve missed the naked dancing?

Sod that for a game of conkers. As noted, the Winter solstice has
just arrived. All sensible citizens should now be securely sewn-in
to their sets of Winter thermal underwear. And sticking two fingers
up at gas price rises. Do not unsew yourself and resume normal
activities until after Easter.
--
Dennis Davis <denni...@fastmail.fm>

Nicholas D. Richards

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Dec 27, 2021, 4:52:39 AM12/27/21
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In article <sqbttb$1fgi$1...@gioia.aioe.org>, Dennis Davis
<denni...@fastmail.fm> on Mon, 27 Dec 2021 at 08:35:55 awoke
Nicholas from his slumbers and wrote
>In article <1250480582.662134611.482...@news.individual.net
>>,
>Tim+ <tim.d...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>Peter <mys...@prune.org.uk> wrote:
>>> ...and as we've past the solstice, days should be getting longer,
>>> if you believe that sort of thing.
>>
>>What?? I’ve missed the naked dancing?
>
>Sod that for a game of conkers. As noted, the Winter solstice has
>just arrived. All sensible citizens should now be securely sewn-in
>to their sets of Winter thermal underwear. And sticking two fingers
>up at gas price rises. Do not unsew yourself and resume normal
>activities until after Easter.

The trouble with that was: unpicking the stitching every time you wanted
a cvff, fuvg or a to pay your respects to Zef Cnyz naq ure svir ybiryl
qnhtugref.
--
0sterc@tcher -

"Où sont les neiges d'antan?"

Sam Plusnet

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Dec 27, 2021, 2:36:11 PM12/27/21
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"Ne'er cast a clout 'til May is out" - so check the nearest hawthorn
bush before taking action.

--
Sam Plusnet

Don Stockbauer

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Dec 28, 2021, 12:44:52 AM12/28/21
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Here in Texas it's 80°F.

Sam Plusnet

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Dec 28, 2021, 1:09:49 PM12/28/21
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That is simply no excuse for clout casting. Is your hawthorn in flower?

--
Sam Plusnet

Dennis Davis

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Dec 30, 2021, 2:28:37 AM12/30/21
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In article <3dde1c52-4dd3-41af...@googlegroups.com>,
>Here in Texas it's 80°F.

Well, you could move to Northern California, eg Nevada City, and
now have a festive, three-feet of snow on your shed roof. Buy your
Winter thermals before you go :-)
--
Dennis Davis <denni...@fastmail.fm>

Tease'n'Seize

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Jan 3, 2022, 12:44:48 PMJan 3
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Peter wrote:

> Tease'n'Seize wrote:
>
>> Peter wrote:
>>
>>> days should be getting longer, if you believe that sort of thing.
>>
>> sunrises still getting later for another week or more, thobut </gloom>
>
> That's OK, longer in bed in the morning, innit.

Some photons managed to get past the bedroom curtings before 9am today, I
suspect that was to do with fewer clouds, rather than shifting the earth's axis ...

Peter

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Jan 3, 2022, 12:55:07 PMJan 3
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Tease'n'Seize <tease-and-seize@invalid> wrote in
news:7bWdnabmheKQq078...@brightview.co.uk:
We too had a brief splash of something that SWMBO reminded me was called
"sunshine" before the clouds pulled themselves together.

--
Peter
-----

Kerr-Mudd, John

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Jan 5, 2022, 6:26:41 AMJan 5
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My https://www.timeanddate.com/sun/uk/bristol
lookup says it (sunrise) is stuck at 8:15 here.

Ah no! It was a minute eralier today! Hurrah!

--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.

Chris Elvidge

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Jan 5, 2022, 9:32:18 AMJan 5
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Is that Bristol or GMT?

--
Chris Elvidge
England

John Williamson

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Jan 5, 2022, 10:29:06 AMJan 5
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Railway time. HTH.

Kerr-Mudd, John

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Jan 5, 2022, 2:42:48 PMJan 5
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Ah Bristol is 10 minutes off London, even by GWR.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Exchange,_Bristol#Clock

I picked Bristol just for an approx latitude, not longitude.

Richard Robinson

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Jan 6, 2022, 6:48:37 AMJan 6
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Cancelled ?

Richard Robinson

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Jan 6, 2022, 6:50:01 AMJan 6
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Is there LNER time, than ?

> I picked Bristol just for an approx latitude, not longitude.
>
>


--

John Williamson

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Jan 6, 2022, 10:16:11 AMJan 6
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On 06/01/2022 11:50, Richard Robinson wrote:
> Kerr-Mudd, John said:
>> On Wed, 5 Jan 2022 14:32:16 +0000 Chris Elvidge <ch...@mshome.net>
>>> Is that Bristol or GMT?
>>>
>> Ah Bristol is 10 minutes off London, even by GWR.
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Exchange,_Bristol#Clock
>
> Is there LNER time, than ?
>
There used to be, yes. Each railway company had their own "master clock"
at the London terminus, and station clocks were checked against a watch
set to match it and carried by the guard on a specified train every day.
(I'd guess the first stopping down train, BICBW.) Guards checked and set
their watches at least daily, as they were the ones who told the driver
and station staff when the train would start moving. Guard's watches
were among the best that could be bought and were the property of the
railway company.

I'm not sure how the companies got their reference time. Possibly a guy
with a watch in a cab from Greenwich once a week?

When they introduced telegraphs and telephones, it all got a lot easier.

Nick Odell

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Jan 6, 2022, 12:03:30 PMJan 6
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Completely without any evidence whatsoever, my money would initially
be on the Greenwich time ball. Intended for shipping, I'd bet that the
London skyline was so different in those days that it could be seen
from plenty of other places too. Excavated ovine, all these
developments came in such a short time of each other (passenger
railways, 1820s; time ball 1830s; electric telegraph 1840s) that by
1850 or thereabouts I doubt if it would have made much difference
anyway. When did universal railway time begin?

Nick

chr...@privacy.net

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Jan 6, 2022, 12:16:26 PMJan 6
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No, it was probably the Greenwich Time Lady - who did quite literally go
round every week with the correct time. Twas on telly the other night -
some old episode of QI - she didn't retire until the age of about 86,
after inheriting the family business from her father. She retired during
the blitz cos it got too dangerous!

HTH, Chris

John Williamson

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Jan 6, 2022, 12:40:05 PMJan 6
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On 06/01/2022 17:03, Nick Odell wrote:

> Completely without any evidence whatsoever, my money would initially
> be on the Greenwich time ball. Intended for shipping, I'd bet that the
> London skyline was so different in those days that it could be seen
> from plenty of other places too.

There's a chuffing great hill in the way, with a rather large cathedral
on top, then another one just North of the Tower of London, so the only
terminus you could see the ball from might have been London Bridge. The
site of the Greenwich observatory was chosen partly due to it being so
far from the bright lights of London, and partly for its very good
visibility from the river. It was also on land owned by the guy that
set it up.

The ball was the official primary reference for everyone, in the same
way the BBC and others now use the pips. Even the GPS satellite clocks
and the pips on the radio are secondary sources. The one o'clock ball's
timing was checked using a sextant or similar at the observatory to
check the highest point of the sun's traverse at noon.

Excavated ovine, all these
> developments came in such a short time of each other (passenger
> railways, 1820s; time ball 1830s; electric telegraph 1840s) that by
> 1850 or thereabouts I doubt if it would have made much difference
> anyway. When did universal railway time begin?
>
I'm not sure of the dates, but it was introduced after a series of
collisions when it was found that a train had left Bristol on time,
using local solar time for Bristol, then met a train coming from London,
which was running on London solar time, which was about five minutes
ahead of Bristol.. Oops.

It didn't take them long to introduce token block working, which is
still used in some places. Once that became universal, exact train times
became less important.

L.T.C. Rolt's 1955 book "Red for Danger" is a very good reference to the
early dangers of rail travel and how they got round them.

Andrew Marshall

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Jan 6, 2022, 1:19:33 PMJan 6
to
On 06/01/2022 17:40, John Williamson wrote:
> L.T.C. Rolt's 1955 book "Red for Danger" is a very good reference to the
> early dangers of rail travel and how they got round them.

Indeed it is; I commend it to anysheddi with an interest in same. The
later edition, with additional material by G. Kichenside, covers some
more accidents, including the Moorgate accident of 28 February 1975.

--
Regards,
Andrew.

John Williamson

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Jan 6, 2022, 2:14:23 PMJan 6
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<Presses "like" button> Thanks for that.

Richard Robinson

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Jan 8, 2022, 6:26:44 AMJan 8
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Chr...@privacy.net said:
> On 06/01/2022 15:16, John Williamson wrote:
>>
>> I'm not sure how the companies got their reference time. Possibly a guy
>> with a watch in a cab from Greenwich once a week?
>
> No, it was probably the Greenwich Time Lady - who did quite literally go
> round every week with the correct time.

On a piece of paper ?

Nicholas D. Richards

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Jan 9, 2022, 6:46:16 AMJan 9
to
In article <PM2dnZ3k6-Fw6UT8...@brightview.co.uk>, Richard
Robinson <rich...@privacy.net> on Sat, 8 Jan 2022 at 05:26:37 awoke
Nicholas from his slumbers and wrote
>Chr...@privacy.net said:
>> On 06/01/2022 15:16, John Williamson wrote:
>>>
>>> I'm not sure how the companies got their reference time. Possibly a guy
>>> with a watch in a cab from Greenwich once a week?
>>
>> No, it was probably the Greenwich Time Lady - who did quite literally go
>> round every week with the correct time.
>
>On a piece of paper ?
>
"You weren't in at 11:03:21 so I left you the time on this piece of
paper at 11:03:22

11:03:23
11:03:24?"
--
0sterc@tcher -

"Oů sont les neiges d'antan?"

Tone

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Jan 9, 2022, 6:50:37 AMJan 9
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What time is it Eccles?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tjHlFPTwVk

Tone

Richard Robinson

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Jan 9, 2022, 7:01:33 AMJan 9
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Sorry, I didn't have the time to read it.

chr...@privacy.net

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Jan 9, 2022, 8:50:11 AMJan 9
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On 08/01/2022 11:26, Richard Robinson wrote:
> Chr...@privacy.net said:
>> On 06/01/2022 15:16, John Williamson wrote:
>>>
>>> I'm not sure how the companies got their reference time. Possibly a guy
>>> with a watch in a cab from Greenwich once a week?
>>
>> No, it was probably the Greenwich Time Lady - who did quite literally go
>> round every week with the correct time.
>
> On a piece of paper ?
>
This explains all:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruth_Belville

C
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