Coin material these days

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Brian Gaff (Sofa)

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Dec 30, 2021, 11:39:34 AM12/30/21
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I wonder why is it that if you use a magnet on some of our uk coins some are
ferrous and some not even of the same denomination?
Is there a reason for switching manufacture from one to the other?
Most of the differences occur in 5p and 2p coins, and yet they look exactly
the same apparently, ie the 5p is still silver and a sod to pick up and the
2p is a bit like our old penny and copper in colour.
Brian

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Tim+

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Dec 30, 2021, 11:47:59 AM12/30/21
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Simple, the coins were becoming more valuable as scrap metal than their
face value. Consequently they’ve now got an iron core.

Tim

Brian Gaff \(Sofa\) <bri...@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
> I wonder why is it that if you use a magnet on some of our uk coins some are
> ferrous and some not even of the same denomination?
> Is there a reason for switching manufacture from one to the other?
> Most of the differences occur in 5p and 2p coins, and yet they look exactly
> the same apparently, ie the 5p is still silver and a sod to pick up and the
> 2p is a bit like our old penny and copper in colour.
> Brian
>



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John Williamson

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Dec 30, 2021, 12:40:22 PM12/30/21
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Over time, as metal values have risen in currency terms, our coinage has
been slowly debased. Silver coins were originally just that, which is
how we got the name of that grade as being sterling silver. As time
passed, and the actual value of the metal increased, so the silver
content decreased. A sovereign used to be a pound's worth of gold of a
defined purity, verified by the stamped design. Sovereign coins showed a
face value of one pound, but now change hands for slightly more than
their scrap values, with the design verifying the purity and the design
and weight telling you they are untampered with. They are a handy way to
carry and transfer value while having no embarrassing contact with "the
system"

The scrap value of the original coins you mention is now more than the
face value when they were introduced, so to reduce the temptation to
melt them down and weigh them in, they are now made of steel with a
coating of the original metal.

Another point is that it would be silly to issue coins that cost more
than their face value to make...

On 30/12/2021 16:39, Brian Gaff (Sofa) wrote:
> I wonder why is it that if you use a magnet on some of our uk coins some are
> ferrous and some not even of the same denomination?
> Is there a reason for switching manufacture from one to the other?
> Most of the differences occur in 5p and 2p coins, and yet they look exactly
> the same apparently, ie the 5p is still silver and a sod to pick up and the
> 2p is a bit like our old penny and copper in colour.
> Brian
>


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Tciao for Now!

John.

RustyHinge

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Dec 30, 2021, 1:14:13 PM12/30/21
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On 30/12/2021 16:39, Brian Gaff (Sofa) wrote:
> I wonder why is it that if you use a magnet on some of our uk coins some are
> ferrous and some not even of the same denomination?
> Is there a reason for switching manufacture from one to the other?
> Most of the differences occur in 5p and 2p coins, and yet they look exactly
> the same apparently, ie the 5p is still silver and a sod to pick up and the
> 2p is a bit like our old penny and copper in colour.

Cost.

--
Rusty Hinge
To err is human. To really foul things up requires a computer and the BOFH.

Sam Plusnet

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Dec 30, 2021, 1:45:16 PM12/30/21
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On 30-Dec-21 17:40, John Williamson wrote:
>
> Another point is that it would be silly to issue coins that cost more
> than their face value to make...

But - given that costs can fluctuate, whilst face value is subject to
inflation - silliness can crop up quite a lot.

--
Sam Plusnet

Nick Odell

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Dec 30, 2021, 4:23:04 PM12/30/21
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Even though I have always fancied casting some bronze mandolin and
guitar parts for myself, I emphatically deny that I have been
collecting and continue to collect older 1p and 2p coins for that
purpose.

Nick

Mike Spencer

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Dec 30, 2021, 6:10:27 PM12/30/21
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Nick Odell <ni...@themusicworkshop.plus.com> writes:

> Even though I have always fancied casting some bronze mandolin and
> guitar parts for myself, I emphatically deny that I have been
> collecting and continue to collect older 1p and 2p coins for that
> purpose.

I have a couple of briar pipes, one I've smoked since 1962, the other
since 197x but inherited from an elderly gentleman so even older.
Eventually the bowls have cracked. I've managed to keep them both
smokable.

Drill a hole in a (now obsolete in both USA and Canada) silver quarter
(25 cent coin), place over a suitable mandrel and hammer the edge
until converted into a flat band. Correct internal diameter and
suitable taper (think of a barrel hoop) can be achieved by judicious
hammering. Fitted snugly to the pipe bowl, perhaps after a little
preparation with a carving tool, can keep the crack(s) from expanding
and eventually splitting the bowl in two.

For me, that's easier than flattening a bit of silver wire and
closing it with solder it into a band.

As an aside of interet only to crafty types, I might note that
repairing pipes is the only place I've had occasion to use some 1/4" x
#0 wood screws picked up in an impulse buy in 1967. I don't think
they make them any more, may not have made them in '67 when they were
probably "new old stock".

--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

hub...@ccanoemail.ca

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Dec 30, 2021, 6:16:47 PM12/30/21
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On 30 Dec 2021 19:09:46 -0400, Mike Spencer
<m...@bogus.nodomain.nowhere> wrote:


>
>As an aside of interet only to crafty types, I might note that
>repairing pipes is the only place I've had occasion to use some 1/4" x
>#0 wood screws picked up in an impulse buy in 1967. I don't think
>they make them any more, may not have made them in '67 when they were
>probably "new old stock".


Item 91Z0001X, #0, 1/4" Flat Brass Screws, pkg. of 10 or 100 ..

https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/hardware/fasteners/screws/wood-screws/40960-flat-head-brass-screws?item=91Z0001X

John T.

Brian Gaff (Sofa)

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Dec 31, 2021, 7:26:18 AM12/31/21
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So in years to come, artefacts will probably only survive before they
started to make them of iron based material, as a little nick in the
plating will let the things rust away.
Brian

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Brian Gaff (Sofa)

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Dec 31, 2021, 7:30:15 AM12/31/21
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In that case, why not make them out of plastic instead?
Brian

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Kerr-Mudd, John

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Dec 31, 2021, 7:47:45 AM12/31/21
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:30:09 -0000
"Brian Gaff \(Sofa\)" <bri...@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

> In that case, why not make them out of plastic instead?
> Brian
>
>
Chips. Gambling for the use of.


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Bah, and indeed Humbug.

Ahem A Rivet's Shot

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Dec 31, 2021, 8:30:02 AM12/31/21
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:30:09 -0000
"Brian Gaff \(Sofa\)" <bri...@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

> In that case, why not make them out of plastic instead?

It'll probably come to that eventually - it's an endless game of
making coins expensive to counterfeit but cheap enough to molish as the face
value steadily declines in buying power.

--
Steve O'Hara-Smith
Odds and Ends at http://www.sohara.org/

Adrian Caspersz

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Dec 31, 2021, 10:56:46 AM12/31/21
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On 30/12/2021 16:39, Brian Gaff (Sofa) wrote:
> I wonder why is it that if you use a magnet on some of our uk coins some are
> ferrous and some not even of the same denomination?
> Is there a reason for switching manufacture from one to the other?
> Most of the differences occur in 5p and 2p coins, and yet they look exactly
> the same apparently, ie the 5p is still silver and a sod to pick up and the
> 2p is a bit like our old penny and copper in colour.
> Brian

You've may be aware of the old 'coin tipping' machines often found in
fairgrounds and amusement arcades.

I've often wondered what would happen now if ye rocked up with a very
strong magnet or two, applied close to the glass.

Would it have the desired en-richening effect, or set off alarms and get
ye booted off the premises?

(prob, would be seen as theft. Nah, ignore I wrote this...)

--
Not Me

Nick Odell

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Dec 31, 2021, 11:37:42 AM12/31/21
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 13:26:44 +0000, Ahem A Rivet's Shot
<ste...@eircom.net> wrote:

>On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:30:09 -0000
>"Brian Gaff \(Sofa\)" <bri...@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
>
>> In that case, why not make them out of plastic instead?
>
> It'll probably come to that eventually - it's an endless game of
>making coins expensive to counterfeit but cheap enough to molish as the face
>value steadily declines in buying power.

In a sense they are doing that already. On this side of the Irish Sea
there's an enormous push to get rid of notes and coins as far as
possible and the nearest some people get to cash these days is an app
on their phone or a bit of plastic with an embedded chip or two.

Poisonally, when I go out and buy a banana, I think it's nobody's
business but my own but while this reprint from the Washington Post
seems focused on how much less personal data ApplePay gives away
versus regular debit and credit card purchases, I'm more focused on
how one can give away even less personal data when using cash.
<https://www.wctrib.com/business/4630928-Analysis-The-spy-in-your-wallet-Credit-cards-have-a-privacy-problem>

Nick

Ahem A Rivet's Shot

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Dec 31, 2021, 12:30:02 PM12/31/21
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 16:37:40 +0000
Nick Odell <ni...@themusicworkshop.plus.com> wrote:

> On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 13:26:44 +0000, Ahem A Rivet's Shot
> <ste...@eircom.net> wrote:
>
> >On Fri, 31 Dec 2021 12:30:09 -0000
> >"Brian Gaff \(Sofa\)" <bri...@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
> >
> >> In that case, why not make them out of plastic instead?
> >
> > It'll probably come to that eventually - it's an endless game of
> >making coins expensive to counterfeit but cheap enough to molish as the
> >face value steadily declines in buying power.
>
> In a sense they are doing that already. On this side of the Irish Sea
> there's an enormous push to get rid of notes and coins as far as
> possible and the nearest some people get to cash these days is an app
> on their phone or a bit of plastic with an embedded chip or two.

Here too, the campaign has been given an added push since COVID
we're urged to use contactless payment methods, the limit on cards has
been bumped to encourage it and to cap it all the transaction times are
sometimes sub-second.

Mike Spencer

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Dec 31, 2021, 4:41:36 PM12/31/21
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Cool! Ausgezeichnet! TYVM. I can drive to a Lee Valley store in 1.5
hours on a clear day. But wait: After ca. 1.4 kilo-fortnights, I
still have 92 of my original purchase of 100 left. How soon will I
need more?

Still, cool to know that somewhere someone is ohling & using them!
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