Hopefully, a soft landing.

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John Williamson

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Aug 10, 2022, 3:05:11 PMAug 10
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Raymond Briggs, creator and illustrator of, among others, the Snowman
series of books and TV shows has drawn his last landing at age 88.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-62490170
--
Tciao for Now!

John.

Brian Gaff

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Aug 10, 2022, 4:31:37 PMAug 10
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I never quite got those films. The music was nice but the graphics were, I
think an acquired taste at the time, kind of ragged looking.
Brian

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"John Williamson" <johnwil...@btinternet.com> wrote in message
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Brownz (via Gurgle Gruppez)

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Aug 11, 2022, 5:37:10 AMAug 11
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On Wednesday, August 10, 2022 at 8:05:11 PM UTC+1, John Williamson wrote:
> Raymond Briggs, creator and illustrator of, among others, the Snowman
> series of books and TV shows has drawn his last landing at age 88.
>
> https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-62490170

Fungus the Bogeyman was my favourite childhood book mixed in with every Asterix and TinTin volume available.

Some 40 odd years ago now.....

Richard Robinson

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Aug 11, 2022, 5:57:39 AMAug 11
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When the wind blows is still as mundanely horifying as ever.

--
Richard Robinson
"The whole plan hinged upon the natural curiosity of potatoes" - S. Lem

My email address is at http://qualmograph.org.uk/contact.html

John Williamson

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Aug 11, 2022, 6:06:39 AMAug 11
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On 11/08/2022 10:57, Richard Robinson wrote:

> When the wind blows is still as mundanely horifying as ever.
>
And becoming increasingly relevant lately.

RustyHinge

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Aug 11, 2022, 6:27:22 AMAug 11
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On 11/08/2022 11:06, John Williamson wrote:
> On 11/08/2022 10:57, Richard Robinson wrote:
>
>> When the wind blows is still as mundanely horifying as ever.
>>
> And becoming increasingly relevant lately.

Somebody get me a big paper bag, IYWBSK

--
Rusty Hinge
To err is human. To really foul things up requires a computer and the BOFH.

Richard Robinson

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Aug 11, 2022, 6:46:21 AMAug 11
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John Williamson said:
> On 11/08/2022 10:57, Richard Robinson wrote:
>
>> When the wind blows is still as mundanely horifying as ever.
>>
> And becoming increasingly relevant lately.

Yes. The number of ways in which so many different interests seem to be
doing their best to fuck eevrything up is beginning too terrify me, and
various fragments of conversation are increasingly giving me the
impression that increasing numbers of people are ncreasingly feeling the
same way, and The News is increasingly giving the impression that this
is fuckall compared with how Interesting things will be in a few months,
while the people who worked so hard to be allowed to take responsibility
for the UKish aspects of all this are either on holiday or paralysed,
and the replacements are terrifying both in themselves and for the way
they have no sodding idea of anything that'll begin to get near sorting
anything in any useful way. Fucking gevpxyrqbja rpbabzvpf my wotsit : if
things could be sorted by richpigs showering the impoverished masses
with lordly generosity, why is this not already sorted, the pigs are
certainly rich.

Rant over. Sorry abut that, but I'm mildly bothered. Feel free to ignore
in the usual style if you wish, expect protests in case of attempts to
assert unenforceable rools wot have never achieved any general
concensus.

The good news is that the nice people in specsavers have promised me new
galsses next week, so the typos should decrease, along with the amount
of time I'm having to spend checking for them. And yes, I know there are
still some left, because fuckit.

Richard Robinson

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Aug 11, 2022, 6:52:36 AMAug 11
to
RustyHinge said:
> On 11/08/2022 11:06, John Williamson wrote:
>> On 11/08/2022 10:57, Richard Robinson wrote:
>>
>>> When the wind blows is still as mundanely horifying as ever.
>>>
>> And becoming increasingly relevant lately.
>
> Somebody get me a big paper bag, IYWBSK

HHTG, wasn't it ?

"Will it help ?"
"No"

RustyHinge

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Aug 11, 2022, 10:50:47 AMAug 11
to
On 11/08/2022 11:52, Richard Robinson wrote:
> RustyHinge said:
>> On 11/08/2022 11:06, John Williamson wrote:
>>> On 11/08/2022 10:57, Richard Robinson wrote:
>>>
>>>> When the wind blows is still as mundanely horifying as ever.
>>>>
>>> And becoming increasingly relevant lately.
>>
>> Somebody get me a big paper bag, IYWBSK
>
> HHTG, wasn't it ?
>
> "Will it help ?"
> "No"

?

RustyHinge

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Aug 11, 2022, 10:56:50 AMAug 11
to
Specsavers, pah! I've got offers of lots of Rayban songlassies at 90%
retail price,

John Williamson

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Aug 11, 2022, 11:20:14 AMAug 11
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On 11/08/2022 15:50, RustyHinge wrote:
> On 11/08/2022 11:52, Richard Robinson wrote:
>> RustyHinge said:
>>> On 11/08/2022 11:06, John Williamson wrote:
>>>> On 11/08/2022 10:57, Richard Robinson wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> When the wind blows is still as mundanely horifying as ever.
>>>>>
>>>> And becoming increasingly relevant lately.
>>>
>>> Somebody get me a big paper bag, IYWBSK
>>
>> HHTG, wasn't it ?
>>
>> "Will it help ?"
>> "No"
>
> ?
>
A quote from the Hitchhikers' Guide To The Galaxy, when Arthur Dent and
Ford Prefect are discussing the impending destruction of the Earth in
the pub (Not Ye Pubbe).

"The man sitting next to Ford was a bit sozzled by now. His eyes weaved
their way up to Ford. ‘I thought,’ he said ‘that if the world was going
to end we were meant to lie down or put a paper bag over our head or
something.’ ‘If you like, yes,’ said Ford. ‘That’s what they told us in
the army,’ said the man, and his eyes began the long trek back towards
his whisky. ‘Will that help?’ asked the barman. ‘No,’ said Ford and gave
him a friendly smile. ‘Excuse me,’ he said, ‘I’ve got to go.’ With a
wave, he left."

Richard Robinson

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Aug 11, 2022, 11:43:12 AMAug 11
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RustyHinge said:
> On 11/08/2022 11:52, Richard Robinson wrote:
>> RustyHinge said:
>>> On 11/08/2022 11:06, John Williamson wrote:
>>>> On 11/08/2022 10:57, Richard Robinson wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> When the wind blows is still as mundanely horifying as ever.
>>>>>
>>>> And becoming increasingly relevant lately.
>>>
>>> Somebody get me a big paper bag, IYWBSK
>>
>> HHTG, wasn't it ?
>>
>> "Will it help ?"
>> "No"
>
> ?

Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy (IIRC): a conversation concerning some
end of the world or other, where the placing of heads in paper bags is
proffered as a possible action.

Tone

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Aug 11, 2022, 12:02:05 PMAug 11
to
On 11/08/2022 16:43, Richard Robinson wrote:
> RustyHinge said:
>> On 11/08/2022 11:52, Richard Robinson wrote:
>>> RustyHinge said:
>>>> On 11/08/2022 11:06, John Williamson wrote:
>>>>> On 11/08/2022 10:57, Richard Robinson wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> When the wind blows is still as mundanely horifying as ever.
>>>>>>
>>>>> And becoming increasingly relevant lately.
>>>>
>>>> Somebody get me a big paper bag, IYWBSK
>>>
>>> HHTG, wasn't it ?
>>>
>>> "Will it help ?"
>>> "No"
>>
>> ?
>
> Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy (IIRC): a conversation concerning some
> end of the world or other, where the placing of heads in paper bags is
> proffered as a possible action.
>
>

When I were a lad in the FAA we were told to paste brown paper over our
windows in the case of nuclear attack.

Tone

Richard Robinson

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Aug 11, 2022, 12:13:12 PMAug 11
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RustyHinge said:
>>
>> The good news is that the nice people in specsavers have promised me new
>> galsses next week, so the typos should decrease, along with the amount
>> of time I'm having to spend checking for them. And yes, I know there are
>> still some left, because fuckit.
>
> Specsavers, pah! I've got offers of lots of Rayban songlassies at 90%
> retail price,

Experiences appear to differ, unless you have a taste for 10% discounts
on ... sunglases, are they ?

IME; I went to my preferred Local Independent Gentleman, telling him I
needed longdistance plus pooterscreen and book reading distances. A few
weeks later he took svir uhaqerq dhvq!!! off me for a single pair of
varifocals, telling me bear with them and you'll get used to it. A few
months later, they are fine at long distances, and cricking me neck for
the occasional bit of small print is occasionally helpful. At the
pooterscreen, if I hold my head exactly (uncomfortably) right, squint
hard and push them right up my nose close as poss to my face, and if
there's no trace of whatever seems to coome off my face and ends up on
the lenses onaccount of said closeness, I can just about see what's
what, according to my settings which used to be ferpectly ok. Books,
forgettit. And mild background headache, because I spend fair chaunks of
time being uncomfortable reading the screen, plus a large increase in
typos.

So I eventually got sick of it, CBA to get hasslish, so went
comparatively shopping; I'd prefer local independents to chains, but
realitycheck time. Specsavers were extremely constructively helpful, in
the form of a nice young lady who pointed out that there was no need for
a test because I already had a recent prescription, went on to notice
that it was short of the necessary information, wrote down the relevant
questions on a piece of paper which I carried round the corner to the
independent bloke (it's a small town) who wrote down the answers which I
carried back to young Sara, who said there might be a problem of Prism
(I dunno) concerning the thin groove in a frame I'd chosen, in which
case she'd ring back in an hour or so when she'd had a chance to find
out, and if I hadn't heard from her by then, I could expect a call
around the middle of next week to come and pick up my 2 new pairs of
reading glasses, at a 2-for-1 price of £89 total. I'd gone in expecting
nothing other than the usual mass-producedd indifference, and I was
wrong. *And* they have notices up about being a specialhealthneeds
coviddycautious place so forget about coming in without either a mask or
a proper reason for its absence, which I continue to like.

See what I mean ?

Tone

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Aug 11, 2022, 12:21:30 PMAug 11
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On 11/08/2022 17:13, Richard Robinson wrote:
> Experiences appear to differ, unless you have a taste for 10% discounts
> on ... sunglases, are they ?

I was recommended to a mobile private optician. He was very good, but to
get a pair of hardened glass varifocals and reading glasses it cost me £300.

Two years later a lens kept falling out of the varifocals so, he
replaced them with another pair. £200.

Next time I need glarses, I shall be going to Specsavers again, as I was
before.

They try to sell me hearing aids, but I don't need 'em.

What?

Tone

RustyHinge

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Aug 11, 2022, 12:40:23 PMAug 11
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Yebbut, it was early advice on a Sybil Defiance prog.

RustyHinge

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Aug 11, 2022, 12:44:01 PMAug 11
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Prolly to prevent shattered pieces showering inhabitants.

Old burglas used to stick paper on window glass with glodden stirrup to
deaden sound of borking glass.

Richard Robinson

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Aug 11, 2022, 12:48:58 PMAug 11
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IIRC, Early '80s "Protect and Survive" tbireazrag issue for the general
population told us to paint 'em white, then take a door off its hinges
and prop it against a wall to hide iunder from the fallout. See Mr.
Briggs' "When the wind blows" for an imaginarily-worked example.

RustyHinge

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Aug 11, 2022, 12:49:35 PMAug 11
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On 11/08/2022 17:13, Richard Robinson wrote:
No. Took me 20 minuets to get used to varifocals. And a worm in your
shell-like, If I can't recognise a ROT immediately, I CBA to jbex it
out. Life's too short.

Richard Robinson

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Aug 11, 2022, 12:52:10 PMAug 11
to
Tone said:
> On 11/08/2022 17:13, Richard Robinson wrote:
>> Experiences appear to differ, unless you have a taste for 10% discounts
>> on ... sunglases, are they ?
>
> I was recommended to a mobile private optician. He was very good, but to
> get a pair of hardened glass varifocals and reading glasses it cost me £300.
>
> Two years later a lens kept falling out of the varifocals so, he
> replaced them with another pair. £200.
>
> Next time I need glarses, I shall be going to Specsavers again, as I was
> before.

Yes.

> They try to sell me hearing aids, but I don't need 'em.
>
> What?

I dunno, I couldn't hear a thing.

Richard Robinson

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Aug 11, 2022, 12:52:59 PMAug 11
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What was the problem it solved ?

RustyHinge

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Aug 11, 2022, 12:54:34 PMAug 11
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I find the hearing-aids I got from Specsavers were worse than useless,
and had to rip them out of my ears many times when sudden loud noises
happened. Couldn't use them in the wild 'cos buses ticking-over were
overloud...

Richard Robinson

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Aug 11, 2022, 12:55:25 PMAug 11
to
RustyHinge said:
>>
>> See what I mean ?
> No. Took me 20 minuets to get used to varifocals.

My experience was not yours.

> If I can't recognise a ROT immediately, I CBA to jbex it
> out. Life's too short.

That's what they're for. And, indeed.

Mike Fleming

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Aug 11, 2022, 2:17:23 PMAug 11
to
On 11/08/2022 17:13, Richard Robinson wrote:
>
> So I eventually got sick of it, CBA to get hasslish, so went
> comparatively shopping; I'd prefer local independents to chains, but
> realitycheck time. Specsavers were extremely constructively helpful, in
> the form of a nice young lady who pointed out that there was no need for
> a test because I already had a recent prescription, went on to notice
> that it was short of the necessary information, wrote down the relevant
> questions on a piece of paper which I carried round the corner to the
> independent bloke (it's a small town) who wrote down the answers which I
> carried back to young Sara, who said there might be a problem of Prism
> (I dunno) concerning the thin groove in a frame I'd chosen, in which
> case she'd ring back in an hour or so when she'd had a chance to find
> out, and if I hadn't heard from her by then, I could expect a call
> around the middle of next week to come and pick up my 2 new pairs of
> reading glasses, at a 2-for-1 price of £89 total. I'd gone in expecting
> nothing other than the usual mass-producedd indifference, and I was
> wrong. *And* they have notices up about being a specialhealthneeds
> coviddycautious place so forget about coming in without either a mask or
> a proper reason for its absence, which I continue to like.

I've been using my local Specsavers for about 15 years, since coming to
the conclusion that I needed glarses (an inability to read Private Eye
led me to that conclusion). They've also recently geared up to do
retinopathy scans, so my annualish diabetes scan can be done there too.
At the last retinopathy scan, I also had my eyesight re-checked. There
was a small change in, er, something (I suffer from mild astigmatism and
long-sightedness). Optician asked if I was getting on OK with current
glarses, and said if I was then I might as well carry on using them.
Which was nice, no hard fryy tactics. I'll be carrying on using them.

Richard Robinson

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Aug 11, 2022, 2:44:28 PMAug 11
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Mike Fleming said:
>
> I've been using my local Specsavers for about 15 years, since coming to
> the conclusion that I needed glarses (an inability to read Private Eye
> led me to that conclusion). They've also recently geared up to do
> retinopathy scans, so my annualish diabetes scan can be done there too.
> At the last retinopathy scan, I also had my eyesight re-checked. There
> was a small change in, er, something (I suffer from mild astigmatism and
> long-sightedness). Optician asked if I was getting on OK with current
> glarses, and said if I was then I might as well carry on using them.
> Which was nice, no hard fryy tactics. I'll be carrying on using them.

Bearing in mind Mr. Hinge, possibly branches have some room for attitude
? but in this town it was a nice suprise, I've not learnt to expect that
sort of thing from chains. They had me on their records so I must have
been there before but I don't remember a thing about it, whereas I will
remember this time. Perhaps they've had a change of manglement or
something. The acceptable face of capitalism, makes a change for once.

Nicholas D. Richards

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Aug 11, 2022, 3:51:04 PMAug 11
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In article <td395r$275nj$1...@dont-email.me>, Tone <to...@email.com> on
Thu, 11 Aug 2022 at 17:02:02 awoke Nicholas from his slumbers and wrote
Is that before or after?
--
0sterc@tcher -

"Oů sont les neiges d'antan?"

RustyHinge

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Aug 11, 2022, 4:21:53 PMAug 11
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On 11/08/2022 19:44, Richard Robinson wrote:
> Mike Fleming said:
>>
>> I've been using my local Specsavers for about 15 years, since coming to
>> the conclusion that I needed glarses (an inability to read Private Eye
>> led me to that conclusion). They've also recently geared up to do
>> retinopathy scans, so my annualish diabetes scan can be done there too.
>> At the last retinopathy scan, I also had my eyesight re-checked. There
>> was a small change in, er, something (I suffer from mild astigmatism and
>> long-sightedness). Optician asked if I was getting on OK with current
>> glarses, and said if I was then I might as well carry on using them.
>> Which was nice, no hard fryy tactics. I'll be carrying on using them.
>
> Bearing in mind Mr. Hinge, possibly branches have some room for attitude
> ? but in this town it was a nice suprise, I've not learnt to expect that
> sort of thing from chains. They had me on their records so I must have
> been there before but I don't remember a thing about it, whereas I will
> remember this time. Perhaps they've had a change of manglement or
> something. The acceptable face of capitalism, makes a change for once.

Nuffink to do with me, guv. You've been replying to Mike Fleming's post.

Richard Robinson

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Aug 11, 2022, 4:58:18 PMAug 11
to
What are you smoking, and do I actually want any ?

Tone

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Aug 11, 2022, 9:17:00 PMAug 11
to
On 11/08/2022 20:42, Nicholas D. Richards wrote:
>> When I were a lad in the FAA we were told to paste brown paper over our
>> windows in the case of nuclear attack.
>>
> Is that before or after?

Yes.

Tone

Peter

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Aug 12, 2022, 5:06:32 AMAug 12
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Richard Robinson <ric...@qualmograph.org.uk> wrote in
news:td3c59$278u7$6...@dont-email.me:

> RustyHinge said:
>>
>> Yebbut, it was early advice on a Sybil Defiance prog.
>
> What was the problem it solved ?

The problem that the General Pubic might be frightened if they though there
was nothing they could do. Putting a paper bag over the head was something
they could do, as was crawling under the table, drawing the curtains and all
the other instructions in the Sybil Defiance leaflets. All equally effective
against a hootering great burmb.

--
Peter
-----

Richard Robinson

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Aug 12, 2022, 5:13:36 AMAug 12
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Yes, that thing.

Something must be done
This is something
Therefore this must be done.

Peter

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Aug 12, 2022, 5:19:11 AMAug 12
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Tone <to...@email.com> wrote in news:td3aa9$27am1$1...@dont-email.me:
SWMBO needs hearing aids and gets them from specsavers. Not cheap but she
went back several times to get them adjusted (all part of the service -
they take a bit of getting used to) and is now very pleased with them. So
am I.."Do you want a cup of tea?""what do you mean, I cleaned it
yesterday" doesn't happen any more.


--
Peter
-----

Peter

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Aug 12, 2022, 5:25:51 AMAug 12
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Richard Robinson <ric...@qualmograph.org.uk> wrote in
news:td39qm$278u7$1...@dont-email.me:

>
> Specsavers were extremely constructively helpful,
> in the form of a nice young lady who pointed out that there was no
> need for a test because I already had a recent prescription, went on
>

I've been going to the local independent chap for ages and have eschewed
specsavers, but DVLA insist on me using specsavers for my three-yearly
eyesight test and they are, as you say, very helpful. I might swap over to
them because I'm not entirely satisfied with my exceeding zbarlous specs
from the independent.

--
Peter
-----

Richard Robinson

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Aug 12, 2022, 5:28:04 AMAug 12
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Sortof grin. I'm not there yet, but there's still time.

"It's *Thursday*, dear"
"Yes, so am I"
so they went for a pint.

John Williamson

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Aug 12, 2022, 5:37:38 AMAug 12
to
Odd, I need to get an eye test for my PCV licence renewal, and they do
not specify who does it, as long as they have the correct equipment. It
may be that in your area, Specsavers are the only place that have it,
but last time, the doctor that did my medical for my licence renewal did
the eye test as part of that.

The Nomad

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Aug 12, 2022, 5:46:38 AMAug 12
to
On Fri, 12 Aug 2022 09:13:35 -0000 (UTC), Richard Robinson
<ric...@qualmograph.org.uk> wrote:

> Peter said:
>> Richard Robinson <ric...@qualmograph.org.uk> wrote in
>> news:td3c59$278u7$6...@dont-email.me:
>>
>>> RustyHinge said:
>>>>
>>>> Yebbut, it was early advice on a Sybil Defiance prog.
>>>
>>> What was the problem it solved ?
>>
>> The problem that the General Pubic might be frightened if they though
>> there was nothing they could do. Putting a paper bag over the head was
>> something they could do, as was crawling under the table, drawing the
>> curtains and all the other instructions in the Sybil Defiance leaflets.
>> All equally effective against a hootering great burmb.
>
> Yes, that thing.
>
> Something must be done This is something Therefore this must be done.

Seems like an awful lot of 'stuff' is ^ these days :-(

Avpx

--
The Patrician relaxed, in a way which only then drew gentle attention
to the foregoing moment of tension.
(Men at Arms)
Fri 10573 Sep 10:45:01 BST 1993
10:45:01 up 11 min, 3 users, load average: 0.67, 1.32, 1.14

Richard Robinson

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Aug 12, 2022, 5:52:39 AMAug 12
to
Now there's a thing. A couple of years back I renewed my license, and
the new one had an end date of my 70th birthday. And I had been under
the impression that a subsequent one might require some sort of eyesight
provability. But, that date coming due soon, I have subsequently
applied for another new one, and got it in the post a few days later
with no such questions being asked except for a 'yes, I need glasses'
tickbox.

So the questioon is, might you know how that stuff works, when are such
tests asked for ?

Richard Robinson

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Aug 12, 2022, 5:57:38 AMAug 12
to
The Nomad said:
> On Fri, 12 Aug 2022 09:13:35 -0000 (UTC), Richard Robinson
>> Peter said:
>>> Richard Robinson <ric...@qualmograph.org.uk> wrote in
>>>> RustyHinge said:
>>>>>
>>>>> Yebbut, it was early advice on a Sybil Defiance prog.
>>>>
>>>> What was the problem it solved ?
>>>
>>> The problem that the General Pubic might be frightened if they though
>>> there was nothing they could do. Putting a paper bag over the head was
>>> something they could do, as was crawling under the table, drawing the
>>> curtains and all the other instructions in the Sybil Defiance leaflets.
>>> All equally effective against a hootering great burmb.
>>
>> Yes, that thing.
>>
>> Something must be done This is something Therefore this must be done.
>
> Seems like an awful lot of 'stuff' is ^ these days :-(

Distressing absence of clue, yes. Only one remotely on planet
rest-of-the-world appears to be ... if you will excuse me :

Never a frown
With Gordon Brown.

ahem. Sorry, but I've been waiting ages for a chance to get that one off
my chest.

A Mad World, My Masters

Peter

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Aug 12, 2022, 6:02:40 AMAug 12
to
Richard Robinson <ric...@qualmograph.org.uk> wrote in
news:td57t6$2fe8u$6...@dont-email.me:

> Peter said:
>> Richard Robinson <ric...@qualmograph.org.uk> wrote in
>> news:td39qm$278u7$1...@dont-email.me:
>>
>>> Specsavers were extremely constructively helpful,
>>> in the form of a nice young lady who pointed out that there was no
>>> need for a test because I already had a recent prescription, went on
>>
>> I've been going to the local independent chap for ages and have
>> eschewed specsavers, but DVLA insist on me using specsavers for my
>> three-yearly eyesight test and they are, as you say, very helpful. I
>> might swap over to them because I'm not entirely satisfied with my
>> exceeding zbarlous specs from the independent.
>
> Now there's a thing. A couple of years back I renewed my license, and
> the new one had an end date of my 70th birthday. And I had been under
> the impression that a subsequent one might require some sort of
> eyesight provability. But, that date coming due soon, I have
> subsequently applied for another new one, and got it in the post a few
> days later with no such questions being asked except for a 'yes, I
> need glasses' tickbox.
>
> So the questioon is, might you know how that stuff works, when are
> such tests asked for ?

I have rather acute glaucoma. I think that's why they pick on me
(reasonably enough - I'd pick on me in their position). I suspect they'll
invite me to hand in my license in anothe few years.

--
Peter
-----

John Williamson

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Aug 12, 2022, 6:12:25 AMAug 12
to
On 12/08/2022 10:52, Richard Robinson wrote:
> Peter said:
>> Richard Robinson <ric...@qualmograph.org.uk> wrote in
>> news:td39qm$278u7$1...@dont-email.me:
>>
>>> Specsavers were extremely constructively helpful,
>>> in the form of a nice young lady who pointed out that there was no
>>> need for a test because I already had a recent prescription, went on
>>
>> I've been going to the local independent chap for ages and have eschewed
>> specsavers, but DVLA insist on me using specsavers for my three-yearly
>> eyesight test and they are, as you say, very helpful. I might swap over to
>> them because I'm not entirely satisfied with my exceeding zbarlous specs
>> from the independent.
>
> Now there's a thing. A couple of years back I renewed my license, and
> the new one had an end date of my 70th birthday. And I had been under
> the impression that a subsequent one might require some sort of eyesight
> provability. But, that date coming due soon, I have subsequently
> applied for another new one, and got it in the post a few days later
> with no such questions being asked except for a 'yes, I need glasses'
> tickbox.
>
> So the questioon is, might you know how that stuff works, when are such
> tests asked for ?
>
>
Those of us who have problems such as diabetes, glaucoma and one or two
others are required to have our eyes checked before theybuggrem will
renew our licences, even before the we reach three score years and ten.

Richard Robinson

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Aug 12, 2022, 6:24:42 AMAug 12
to
Peter said:
> Richard Robinson <ric...@qualmograph.org.uk> wrote in
>> Peter said:
>>> Richard Robinson <ric...@qualmograph.org.uk> wrote in
>>>
>>>> Specsavers were extremely constructively helpful,
>>>> in the form of a nice young lady who pointed out that there was no
>>>> need for a test because I already had a recent prescription, went on
>>>
>>> I've been going to the local independent chap for ages and have
>>> eschewed specsavers, but DVLA insist on me using specsavers for my
>>> three-yearly eyesight test and they are, as you say, very helpful. I
>>> might swap over to them because I'm not entirely satisfied with my
>>> exceeding zbarlous specs from the independent.
>>
>> Now there's a thing. A couple of years back I renewed my license, and
>> the new one had an end date of my 70th birthday. And I had been under
>> the impression that a subsequent one might require some sort of
>> eyesight provability. But, that date coming due soon, I have
>> subsequently applied for another new one, and got it in the post a few
>> days later with no such questions being asked except for a 'yes, I
>> need glasses' tickbox.
>>
>> So the questioon is, might you know how that stuff works, when are
>> such tests asked for ?
>
> I have rather acute glaucoma. I think that's why they pick on me
> (reasonably enough - I'd pick on me in their position). I suspect they'll
> invite me to hand in my license in anothe few years.

Ah, thanks, yes, matters arising from the wider health questions (which
in my case I am not aware of yet).

Will it be much of a nuisance ?

Richard Robinson

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Aug 12, 2022, 6:26:57 AMAug 12
to
Makes sense, yes. I'd been bothered it might be more general, and thus
noticed it hadn't been; it was one of the factors leading up to my
previous whinge about new glasses.

Peter

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Aug 12, 2022, 7:55:00 AMAug 12
to
Richard Robinson <ric...@qualmograph.org.uk> wrote in
news:td59p9$2fe8u$9...@dont-email.me:

> Peter said:
>>
>> I have rather acute glaucoma. I think that's why they pick on me
>> (reasonably enough - I'd pick on me in their position). I suspect
>> they'll invite me to hand in my license in anothe few years.
>
> Ah, thanks, yes, matters arising from the wider health questions
> (which in my case I am not aware of yet).
>
> Will it be much of a nuisance ?
>

We're slowly adjusting our modes of transport to avoid it being a nuisance.
SWMBO's doing better than me - hops on a bus at the drop of a hat. I'm the
driver of the fambly and it's proving a little difficult to get out of the
habit. I'll be 80 in a frighteningly small number of years (where did life
go?) and that seems like a useful target for giving up driving.

--
Peter
-----

chr...@privacy.net

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Aug 12, 2022, 10:04:17 AMAug 12
to
Somewhere I still have my 'One in Five' leaflets in their original brown
envelope...
https://mrc-catalogue.warwick.ac.uk/records/BKR/5/4/9
I'm surprised they don't have their own wiki entry!

Chris

Nicholas D. Richards

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Aug 12, 2022, 3:15:51 PMAug 12
to
In article <XnsAEF166D513...@88.198.57.247>, Peter
<mys...@prune.org.uk> on Fri, 12 Aug 2022 at 09:06:31 awoke Nicholas
from his slumbers and wrote
Tinfoil hat time?

Nicholas D. Richards

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Aug 12, 2022, 3:35:51 PMAug 12
to
In article <XnsAEF168FAD5...@88.198.57.247>, Peter
<mys...@prune.org.uk> on Fri, 12 Aug 2022 at 09:19:10 awoke Nicholas
from his slumbers and wrote
>Tone <to...@email.com> wrote in news:td3aa9$27am1$1...@dont-email.me:
>
>> On 11/08/2022 17:13, Richard Robinson wrote:
>>> Experiences appear to differ, unless you have a taste for 10%
>>> discounts on ... sunglases, are they ?
>>
>> I was recommended to a mobile private optician. He was very good, but
>> to get a pair of hardened glass varifocals and reading glasses it cost
>> me ÂŁ300.
>>
>> Two years later a lens kept falling out of the varifocals so, he
>> replaced them with another pair. ÂŁ200.
>>
>> Next time I need glarses, I shall be going to Specsavers again, as I
>> was before.
>>
>> They try to sell me hearing aids, but I don't need 'em.
>>
>> What?
>>
>> Tone
>
>SWMBO needs hearing aids and gets them from specsavers. Not cheap but she
>went back several times to get them adjusted (all part of the service -
>they take a bit of getting used to) and is now very pleased with them. So
>am I.."Do you want a cup of tea?""what do you mean, I cleaned it
>yesterday" doesn't happen any more.
>
>
Its been like that for a ever in this household, bit this is a Vis-
Taglish household with touches of Chutzpah and 'Ya nis nigh you'* thrown
in for good measure.

* My rendition of the Russian for 'I don't know', which my mother was
for ever saying to my Granny, before she put the phone down.

Sam Plusnet

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Aug 12, 2022, 5:30:17 PMAug 12
to
On 12-Aug-22 10:13, Richard Robinson wrote:
> Peter said:
>> Richard Robinson <ric...@qualmograph.org.uk> wrote in
>> news:td3c59$278u7$6...@dont-email.me:
>>
>>> RustyHinge said:
>>>>
>>>> Yebbut, it was early advice on a Sybil Defiance prog.
>>>
>>> What was the problem it solved ?
>>
>> The problem that the General Pubic might be frightened if they though there
>> was nothing they could do. Putting a paper bag over the head was something
>> they could do, as was crawling under the table, drawing the curtains and all
>> the other instructions in the Sybil Defiance leaflets. All equally effective
>> against a hootering great burmb.
>
> Yes, that thing.
>
> Something must be done
> This is something
> Therefore this must be done.

Airport 'security' then?

--
Sam Plusnet


Sam Plusnet

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Aug 12, 2022, 5:50:22 PMAug 12
to
On 12-Aug-22 12:54, Peter wrote:
> We're slowly adjusting our modes of transport to avoid it being a nuisance.
> SWMBO's doing better than me - hops on a bus at the drop of a hat. I'm the
> driver of the fambly and it's proving a little difficult to get out of the
> habit. I'll be 80 in a frighteningly small number of years (where did life
> go?) and that seems like a useful target for giving up driving.

I'm not at that point, but since I need to renew my licence again
towards the end of this year, I have wondered about the changes that
depending on public transport would make to our lives.

WIWAL, no-body in our family could drive (parents never learned) & all
trips were by bus[1] - there being only a single bus route which came
through the village, so travel was very 'linear'. If it was on that bus
route we could get there.

Many years later I went back, & discovered all sorts of villages & towns
- only short distances away - that I knew nothing about.

That said, our local bus services here are bliddy terrific - a bus every
10 minutes - unlike the hourly service (with gaps) WIWAL.

[1] Trips beyond walking distance, I mean.

--
Sam Plusnet


Mike Fleming

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Aug 12, 2022, 6:45:07 PMAug 12
to
On 12/08/2022 10:25, Peter wrote:
Mine supplied me with my prescription (as I believe is the legal
requirement), but also measured my interpupillary distance so I could
order from online suppliers if I wanted to. Not just not pushing me into
buying a new pair, but also facilitating my using the competition.

maus

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Aug 13, 2022, 2:15:46 AMAug 13
to
On 2022-08-12, Sam Plusnet <n...@home.com> wrote:
> On 12-Aug-22 12:54, Peter wrote:
>> We're slowly adjusting our modes of transport to avoid it being a nuisance.
>> SWMBO's doing better than me - hops on a bus at the drop of a hat. I'm the
>> driver of the fambly and it's proving a little difficult to get out of the
>> habit. I'll be 80 in a frighteningly small number of years (where did life
>> go?) and that seems like a useful target for giving up driving.
>
> I'm not at that point, but since I need to renew my licence again
> towards the end of this year, I have wondered about the changes that
> depending on public transport would make to our lives.
>
> WIWAL, no-body in our family could drive (parents never learned) & all
> trips were by bus[1] - there being only a single bus route which came
> through the village, so travel was very 'linear'. If it was on that bus
> route we could get there.
>
> Many years later I went back, & discovered all sorts of villages & towns
> - only short distances away - that I knew nothing about.

There was a fox covert just over the horizon from where i lived at
onetime. With no TV, as children we visited very casually every house in
the area, no doors locked. When visiting one place, the old man who
lived therein asked me, did you ever go over there?. He had never been
in that covert, the old couple had an ass and a small cart, so we, local
children, loaded the old man up and headed for the covert, losing the
old man when turning the cart in a tight spot, just loaded him up again,
no prob.
>
> That said, our local bus services here are bliddy terrific - a bus every
> 10 minutes - unlike the hourly service (with gaps) WIWAL.
>
> [1] Trips beyond walking distance, I mean.
>


--
grey...@mail.org

Fe Fi Fo Fum, I smell the stench of an influencer.
Do you want cockroaches with that?.

Richard Robinson

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Aug 13, 2022, 2:26:07 AMAug 13
to
Nicholas D. Richards said:
> In article <XnsAEF168FAD5...@88.198.57.247>, Peter
><mys...@prune.org.uk> on Fri, 12 Aug 2022 at 09:19:10 awoke Nicholas
> from his slumbers and wrote
>>Tone <to...@email.com> wrote in news:td3aa9$27am1$1...@dont-email.me:
>>
>>> On 11/08/2022 17:13, Richard Robinson wrote:
>>>> Experiences appear to differ, unless you have a taste for 10%
>>>> discounts on ... sunglases, are they ?
>>>
>>> I was recommended to a mobile private optician. He was very good, but
>>> to get a pair of hardened glass varifocals and reading glasses it cost
>>> me £300.
>>>
>>> Two years later a lens kept falling out of the varifocals so, he
>>> replaced them with another pair. £200.
>>>
>>> Next time I need glarses, I shall be going to Specsavers again, as I
>>> was before.
>>>
>>> They try to sell me hearing aids, but I don't need 'em.
>>>
>>> What?
>>>
>>> Tone
>>
>>SWMBO needs hearing aids and gets them from specsavers. Not cheap but she
>>went back several times to get them adjusted (all part of the service -
>>they take a bit of getting used to) and is now very pleased with them. So
>>am I.."Do you want a cup of tea?""what do you mean, I cleaned it
>>yesterday" doesn't happen any more.
>>
>>
> Its been like that for a ever in this household, bit this is a Vis-
> Taglish household with touches of Chutzpah and 'Ya nis nigh you'* thrown
> in for good measure.

I scraped a pass in Russian O-level in 1968, and have never used it
since ... how about Ya nye znayoo ?

Oh... with one exception, which was a family holiday in a hotel in
Marrakech which had a Bar where there were a couple of local people
actually drinking booze, gasp. And thus a vague possibility of
intriguing conversation. One of them had been to Uni. in Moscow and
refused to speak to me in anything except Russian. Very little meaning
was established beyond those facts; and that it was kind of interesting
to know that such people are possible.

> * My rendition of the Russian for 'I don't know', which my mother was
> for ever saying to my Granny, before she put the phone down.

"nye" as in NYET.

Richard Robinson

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Aug 13, 2022, 2:27:03 AMAug 13
to
Sam Plusnet said:
> On 12-Aug-22 10:13, Richard Robinson wrote:
>> Peter said:
>>> Richard Robinson <ric...@qualmograph.org.uk> wrote in
>>>> RustyHinge said:
>>>>>
>>>>> Yebbut, it was early advice on a Sybil Defiance prog.
>>>>
>>>> What was the problem it solved ?
>>>
>>> The problem that the General Pubic might be frightened if they though there
>>> was nothing they could do. Putting a paper bag over the head was something
>>> they could do, as was crawling under the table, drawing the curtains and all
>>> the other instructions in the Sybil Defiance leaflets. All equally effective
>>> against a hootering great burmb.
>>
>> Yes, that thing.
>>
>> Something must be done
>> This is something
>> Therefore this must be done.
>
> Airport 'security' then?

M/c airport is a scary place.

Kerr-Mudd, John

unread,
Aug 13, 2022, 4:45:44 AMAug 13
to
ITYF it's 15 or maybe 12. But only up & down the Valley.

There's even services to places I had no idea still existed; (that is the
pubs shut decades ago, so obv I''d not been there since).


> [1] Trips beyond walking distance, I mean.

Cycling not an option?

>
> --
> Sam Plusnet
>
>


--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.

Nicholas D. Richards

unread,
Aug 13, 2022, 6:46:47 AMAug 13
to
In article <td7g5u$2ovci$4...@dont-email.me>, Richard Robinson
<ric...@qualmograph.org.uk> on Sat, 13 Aug 2022 at 06:26:06 awoke
Nicholas from his slumbers and wrote
>Nicholas D. Richards said:
>> In article <XnsAEF168FAD5...@88.198.57.247>, Peter
>><mys...@prune.org.uk> on Fri, 12 Aug 2022 at 09:19:10 awoke Nicholas
>> from his slumbers and wrote
>>>Tone <to...@email.com> wrote in news:td3aa9$27am1$1...@dont-email.me:
>>>
>>>SWMBO needs hearing aids and gets them from specsavers. Not cheap but she
>>>went back several times to get them adjusted (all part of the service -
>>>they take a bit of getting used to) and is now very pleased with them. So
>>>am I.."Do you want a cup of tea?""what do you mean, I cleaned it
>>>yesterday" doesn't happen any more.
>>>
>>>
>> Its been like that for a ever in this household, bit this is a Vis-
>> Taglish household with touches of Chutzpah and 'Ya nis nigh you'* thrown
>> in for good measure.
>
>I scraped a pass in Russian O-level in 1968, and have never used it
>since ... how about Ya nye znayoo ?

That looks about right, thank you. I have added it to my list of Russian
words.

As an aside my mother did not learn to read or write in Russian until
she had retired and her parents had died. She said that it was quite
strange because her fellow students were young and having to learn to
speak Russian. She learnt to button her lip when her Russian teacher
(who was English just out university) corrected her Russian.
>
>Oh... with one exception, which was a family holiday in a hotel in
>Marrakech which had a Bar where there were a couple of local people
>actually drinking booze, gasp. And thus a vague possibility of
>intriguing conversation. One of them had been to Uni. in Moscow and
>refused to speak to me in anything except Russian. Very little meaning
>was established beyond those facts; and that it was kind of interesting
>to know that such people are possible.
>
>> * My rendition of the Russian for 'I don't know', which my mother was
>> for ever saying to my Granny, before she put the phone down.
>
>"nye" as in NYET.
>
I had worked out that out, more or less. There was a family joke around
'Ya nye znayoo',

"What does 'Ya nye znayoo' mean Mum?"
"I don't know"
"You must, you keep saying it to Granny."

There was a similar conversation about the Russian for "it does not
matter", which sounds like 'Nitch y vo'. I can find it in a translation
dictionary, but Cyrillics will not go into usenet.

Richard Robinson

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Aug 13, 2022, 9:17:23 AMAug 13
to
Nicholas D. Richards said:
> In article <td7g5u$2ovci$4...@dont-email.me>, Richard Robinson
>>>>
>>> Its been like that for a ever in this household, bit this is a Vis-
>>> Taglish household with touches of Chutzpah and 'Ya nis nigh you'* thrown
>>> in for good measure.
>>
>>I scraped a pass in Russian O-level in 1968, and have never used it
>>since ... how about Ya nye znayoo ?
>
> That looks about right, thank you. I have added it to my list of Russian
> words.

Cooblimey. They told me it'd be useful, back in 1966. They never said
I'd have to wait so long.

> "What does 'Ya nye znayoo' mean Mum?"
> "I don't know"
> "You must, you keep saying it to Granny."

*grone*, bangs head on brick wall, other divers sound effects.

> There was a similar conversation about the Russian for "it does not
> matter", which sounds like 'Nitch y vo'. I can find it in a translation
> dictionary, but Cyrillics will not go into usenet.

Oh goody, WTF8 one more time !

ничево ?

Sam Plusnet

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Aug 13, 2022, 5:35:33 PMAug 13
to
Krect.

I (technically speaking) do own a bike, but it's buried in a shed with
lost of other stuff piled on top - it hasn't been out of there in the
last <thinks> 30 years & would need major repair/replenishment if it
ever emerged.
The main reason to leave it there is that SWMBO would insist that _she_
should also have her bike out of there (same vintage).
The problem with that is that she fell off at the drop of a SWMBO when
she was in her 20s & 30s (absolutely no sense of balance at all).
I doubt if she's improved now she's reached over 1,800 fortnights.


--
Sam Plusnet


Richard Robinson

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Aug 14, 2022, 4:42:57 AMAug 14
to
Sam Plusnet said:
>
> I (technically speaking) do own a bike, but it's buried in a shed with
> lost of other stuff piled on top - it hasn't been out of there in the
> last <thinks> 30 years & would need major repair/replenishment if it
> ever emerged.

I used to have one of those (though not so long) - it's a small house,
it was the way, into shed, cobwebs & rust ... eventually I passed it on
to someone who actually wanted it. I don't enjoy cycling for its own
sake very often, most of my stuff can be done on foot or by public
transport, which quite likereally, but, once in a while a bike might
cummin handhi ... I now have a cheap (Argos) folding bike, which I
probably won't use much, but at least it only gets in the way to a much
lesser extent, so that's okay.

Richard Robinson

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Aug 14, 2022, 5:04:21 AMAug 14
to
Richard Robinson said:
> Sam Plusnet said:
>>
>> I (technically speaking) do own a bike, but it's buried in a shed with
>> lost of other stuff piled on top - it hasn't been out of there in the
>> last <thinks> 30 years & would need major repair/replenishment if it
>> ever emerged.
>
> I used to have one of those (though not so long) - it's a small house,
> it was the way, into shed, cobwebs & rust ... eventually I passed it on
buggrit. *in* the way
> to someone who actually wanted it. I don't enjoy cycling for its own
> sake very often, most of my stuff can be done on foot or by public
> transport, which quite likereally, but, once in a while a bike might
*I* quite like

RustyHinge

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Aug 14, 2022, 6:15:31 AMAug 14
to
On 14/08/2022 10:04, Richard Robinson wrote:
> Richard Robinson said:
>> Sam Plusnet said:
>>>
>>> I (technically speaking) do own a bike, but it's buried in a shed with
>>> lost of other stuff piled on top - it hasn't been out of there in the
>>> last <thinks> 30 years & would need major repair/replenishment if it
>>> ever emerged.
>>
>> I used to have one of those (though not so long) - it's a small house,
>> it was the way, into shed, cobwebs & rust ... eventually I passed it on
> buggrit. *in* the way
>> to someone who actually wanted it. I don't enjoy cycling for its own
>> sake very often, most of my stuff can be done on foot or by public
>> transport, which quite likereally, but, once in a while a bike might
> *I* quite like
>> cummin handhi ... I now have a cheap (Argos) folding bike, which I
>> probably won't use much, but at least it only gets in the way to a much
>> lesser extent, so that's okay.

Ah, someone who dozen cheque his psots forerrors before ascending...

--
Rusty Hinge
To err is human. To really foul things up requires a computer and the BOFH.

Richard Robinson

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Aug 14, 2022, 6:34:16 AMAug 14
to
As I have previously mentioned reasons for. And in this case obviously
already fixed, even if belatedly. You seem to be becoming a very creaky
Hinge on a subject I have already expressed my own discontent with, and
get orf moi baack.

Kerr-Mudd, John

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Aug 14, 2022, 6:50:15 AMAug 14