Tooth Fettling

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Tone

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Jul 21, 2022, 11:32:56 AMJul 21
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Having had several fillings done a mumff ago, I was munching a packet of
prawn cocktail flavoured crisps when 'crunch'. Spits out what I thought
was one of the fillings. Well that didn't last long, I thought.

So, I phones the dentist in some dudgeon, and insists on an emergency
appointment to get shoddy workmanship sorted. Blimee, I actually got one
within four days!

Today it was. So I'm in the chair and she's poking about in my mouth,
and I'm trying not to stare at her cleavage, and she says, "Well, the
fillings I gave you are all still there, but you've broken another tooth!"

I mumbled a quick apology. On crisps? She took it well. She said, "As
you're here now I'll put a temporary filling in for you, and then we can
rebook to have another permanent one."

So, I now have an appointment for 16th September!

I suppose I'm lucky to have any of my own teeth at my age, but I was a
fluoridation kid.

Tone

maus

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Jul 21, 2022, 12:32:06 PMJul 21
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Coming home happy, stuffing popcorn into the microwave, and trying to
eat them before they were fully popped did for mine.



--
grey...@mail.com
"Are you sure that you can live on your investments after retirement?
If not, send us all your money."

soup

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Jul 21, 2022, 2:12:49 PMJul 21
to
On 21/07/2022 16:32, Tone wrote:

>
> I suppose I'm lucky to have any of my own teeth at my age, but I was a
> fluoridation kid.

I hated that, every Monday morning at school, sloshing the Flouride
liquid stuff around my teeth and gums then spitting it into a big bucket.

It was supposed to be strawberry flavour, tasted like fuvg.

Suppose it was a bit of an experiment "we'll get all these lower income
kids to have brilliant teeth then when they get a job in some factory
somewhere they won't need time off due to teeth problems"

I can still imagine the taste of that penc today, (and yes the thought
of it still makes me gag) nearly fifty-five years later.




Sort of talking about it on mumsnet.

https://www.mumsnet.com/talk/scotsnet/2458577-ANOTHER-strange-question-if-you-were-at-primary-school-in-the-70s

Think the dates must be different in Strathclyde, it was late 60s(maybe
early70s), here (Edinburgh, Scotland). I remember the dates as it was
Primary and I started secondary in '73

John Williamson

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Jul 21, 2022, 2:20:05 PMJul 21
to
On 21/07/2022 19:12, soup wrote:
> On 21/07/2022 16:32, Tone wrote:
>
>>
>> I suppose I'm lucky to have any of my own teeth at my age, but I was a
>> fluoridation kid.
>
> I hated that, every Monday morning at school, sloshing the Flouride
> liquid stuff around my teeth and gums then spitting it into a big bucket.
>
Most places just added it to the drinking water at the works. My dad
hated the idea, as he reckoned the flouride could also be used to kill rats.

--
Tciao for Now!

John.

Richard Robinson

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Jul 21, 2022, 2:26:25 PMJul 21
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Was he right ? You could drown them, I suppose.


--
Richard Robinson
"The whole plan hinged upon the natural curiosity of potatoes" - S. Lem

My email address is at http://qualmograph.org.uk/contact.html

John Williamson

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Jul 21, 2022, 2:35:16 PMJul 21
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On 21/07/2022 19:26, Richard Robinson wrote:
> John Williamson said:
>> On 21/07/2022 19:12, soup wrote:
>>> On 21/07/2022 16:32, Tone wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> I suppose I'm lucky to have any of my own teeth at my age, but I was a
>>>> fluoridation kid.
>>>
>>> I hated that, every Monday morning at school, sloshing the Flouride
>>> liquid stuff around my teeth and gums then spitting it into a big bucket.
>>>
>> Most places just added it to the drinking water at the works. My dad
>> hated the idea, as he reckoned the flouride could also be used to kill rats.
>
> Was he right ? You could drown them, I suppose.
>
>
As we couldn't do anything about it, I never bothered checking.

I did, though, know that some areas' water naturally contained more
flouride in it than water where flouride was added deliberately, and he
had no problems with that.

BTW, excess flouride can cause skeletal and dental flourosis.

Kerr-Mudd, John

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Jul 21, 2022, 4:38:41 PMJul 21
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On 21 Jul 2022 16:32:04 GMT
Scrumping hazelnuts didn't help my gnashers.

--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.

Richard Robinson

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Jul 21, 2022, 7:44:06 PMJul 21
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John Williamson said:
>
> BTW, excess flouride can cause skeletal and dental flourosis.

Breadcrumbs between the teeth ?

Irrelevant, but it niggles at me. *Fluoride*.

RustyHinge

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Jul 21, 2022, 8:45:20 PMJul 21
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On 21/07/2022 16:32, Tone wrote:

> I suppose I'm lucky to have any of my own teeth at my age, but I was a
> fluoridation kid.

I spent a lot of time on Mersea Island where the fluoride level in the
water can be tasted - well, used to be - discoloured teefs TAAAW.

While my array of gnashers isn't perfect, I've never had false toofpegs.

--
Rusty Hinge
To err is human. To really foul things up requires a computer and the BOFH.

Tone

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Jul 22, 2022, 12:54:52 AMJul 22
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On 21/07/2022 19:35, John Williamson wrote:
>
> BTW, excess flouride can cause skeletal and dental flourosis.

Who kneads it?

Tone

Tone

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Jul 22, 2022, 1:02:44 AMJul 22
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On 21/07/2022 21:38, Kerr-Mudd, John wrote:
> Scrumping hazelnuts didn't help my gnashers.

Well stop doing it then.

Tone

Brian Gaff

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Jul 22, 2022, 3:58:43 AMJul 22
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Me too, have most of mine save the bridge where a door walked into my face
and a few fillings, but one tooth has randomly chipped a few weeks back.Not
hurting but my tongue does not like the sharp edges.
Brian

--

--:
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...
bri...@blueyonder.co.uk
Blind user, so no pictures please
Note this Signature is meaningless.!
"Tone" <to...@email.com> wrote in message
news:tbbrj7$2et3e$1...@dont-email.me...

Brian Gaff

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Jul 22, 2022, 4:01:40 AMJul 22
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And another thing, Most dentists have blacked out glasses so their strong
light does not you a headache, a very good way to stop the cleavage issue
I'm told. Brian

--

--:
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...
bri...@blueyonder.co.uk
Blind user, so no pictures please
Note this Signature is meaningless.!
"Tone" <to...@email.com> wrote in message
news:tbbrj7$2et3e$1...@dont-email.me...

Tease'n'Seize

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Jul 22, 2022, 4:12:26 AMJul 22
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Kerr-Mudd, John wrote:

> Scrumping hazelnuts didn't help my gnashers.

Stripping wire didn't help mine.

Peter

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Jul 22, 2022, 4:17:03 AMJul 22
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Tease'n'Seize <tease-and-seize@invalid> wrote in
news:p5GdnQ9515Z5xkf_...@brightview.co.uk:

> Kerr-Mudd, John wrote:
>
>> Scrumping hazelnuts didn't help my gnashers.
>
> Stripping wire didn't help mine.
>

MTAAAW. My front teef protrude slightly - they didn't before I got into
electronics at age of 13.

--
Peter
-----

Ahem A Rivet's Shot

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Jul 22, 2022, 6:00:02 AMJul 22
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I was spared that promble, because I smashed my nearly new front
teeth into the road, after being clipped by a car, when I was ten. The
resultant dental jbex left me with top front teeth that resembled crazy
paving. Stripping wire with my teeth was never an option so I had to learn
to use side cutters carefully very early. The front teeth finished
crumbling and falling out by the time i was forty, I've never bothered to
do anything with the gap since it doesn't cause prombles.

I goove my front teeth must have protruded because the bottom ones
were completely undamaged and are still in pretty good condition.

--
Steve O'Hara-Smith
Odds and Ends at http://www.sohara.org/

RustyHinge

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Jul 22, 2022, 7:11:38 AMJul 22
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On 22/07/2022 10:47, Ahem A Rivet's Shot wrote:

> I was spared that promble, because I smashed my nearly new front
> teeth into the road, after being clipped by a car, when I was ten. The
> resultant dental jbex left me with top front teeth that resembled crazy
> paving. Stripping wire with my teeth was never an option so I had to learn
> to use side cutters carefully very early. The front teeth finished
> crumbling and falling out by the time i was forty, I've never bothered to
> do anything with the gap since it doesn't cause prombles.

Side cutter use not mandatory: I had a pair of wire-strippers. Plier
type tool with two sharp vee slots which come together, leaving (if
you've adjusted it right) a diamond-shaped hole approximately the size
of the wire.

Close the tool on the wire and enough of the insulation is cut to allow
one to pull the wire through, stripped.

Peter

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Jul 22, 2022, 7:53:37 AMJul 22
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RustyHinge <rusty...@foobar.girolle.co.uk> wrote in
news:tbe0l9$331r5$1...@dont-email.me:

> Side cutter use not mandatory: I had a pair of wire-strippers. Plier
> type tool with two sharp vee slots which come together, leaving (if
> you've adjusted it right) a diamond-shaped hole approximately the size
> of the wire.
>
> Close the tool on the wire and enough of the insulation is cut to
> allow one to pull the wire through, stripped.

Yep, I've got a couple of strippers[1] in my electronics toolbox. One of
them is spring-loaded so that it pulls the cable through automagically after
the insulation has been cut. Dunno where it is, thobut.

[1] now now, you know what I mean.
--
Peter
-----

RustyHinge

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Jul 22, 2022, 7:59:37 AMJul 22
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If you read my spam bin you'd maybe learn some new tricks.

Ahem A Rivet's Shot

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Jul 22, 2022, 8:00:29 AMJul 22
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On Fri, 22 Jul 2022 12:11:36 +0100
RustyHinge <rusty...@foobar.girolle.co.uk> wrote:

> Side cutter use not mandatory: I had a pair of wire-strippers. Plier

Lucky hooter - I did get things like that later, but not at first.

Tone

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Jul 22, 2022, 9:41:02 AMJul 22
to
Removing bottle tops didn't help mine. It was quite a good party trick
until I chipped the back of a front tooth (Licks spot.Yup. Still
chipped.) but that then made an excellent sharp wire stripper.

Tone

Peter

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Jul 22, 2022, 10:05:31 AMJul 22
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RustyHinge <rusty...@foobar.girolle.co.uk> wrote in
news:tbe3f8$33njr$1...@dont-email.me:

>
> If you read my spam bin you'd maybe learn some new tricks.
>

Doubt it. I'm an old dog.

--
Peter
-----

Sam Plusnet

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Jul 22, 2022, 3:12:42 PMJul 22
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Denis the Menace took good care of his Gnasher.


--
Sam Plusnet

Sam Plusnet

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Jul 22, 2022, 3:15:16 PMJul 22
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On 22-Jul-22 12:11, RustyHinge wrote:

> Side cutter use not mandatory:

My main unforgettery of side cutters, is the way excess lengths of
component leads go 'ping-fuckit' across the room/into your face etc. etc.


--
Sam Plusnet

Kerr-Mudd, John

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Jul 22, 2022, 3:32:42 PMJul 22
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I Gnu someone would spot that.

RustyHinge

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Jul 22, 2022, 5:44:55 PMJul 22
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On 22/07/2022 12:32, Ahem A Rivet's Shot wrote:
> On Fri, 22 Jul 2022 12:11:36 +0100
> RustyHinge <rusty...@foobar.girolle.co.uk> wrote:
>
>> Side cutter use not mandatory: I had a pair of wire-strippers. Plier
>
> Lucky hooter - I did get things like that later, but not at first.

At first I didn't, either, but when I started leccy chronic jbex and
dabbling in botormikes I gathered the box of tools I found hfrshy.

Thomas Prufer

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Jul 23, 2022, 3:40:46 AMJul 23
to
On Fri, 22 Jul 2022 12:11:36 +0100, RustyHinge
<rusty...@foobar.girolle.co.uk> wrote:

>Side cutter use not mandatory: I had a pair of wire-strippers. Plier
>type tool with two sharp vee slots which come together, leaving (if
>you've adjusted it right) a diamond-shaped hole approximately the size
>of the wire.
>
>Close the tool on the wire and enough of the insulation is cut to allow
>one to pull the wire through, stripped.

I thought the mandatory method was: cut the presumed neutral and earth wires
simultaneously, and as some numpty miswired (compounded by not having isolated
the circuit, because) the resulting arc eats a conductor-sized notch into the
indicters...

Thomas Prufer

Ahem A Rivet's Shot

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Jul 23, 2022, 5:00:02 AMJul 23
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On Sat, 23 Jul 2022 09:40:45 +0200
Thomas Prufer <prufer...@mnet-online.de.invalid> wrote:

> I thought the mandatory method was: cut the presumed neutral and earth
> wires simultaneously, and as some numpty miswired (compounded by not
> having isolated the circuit, because) the resulting arc eats a
> conductor-sized notch into the indicters...

That's one way, then there's this approach:

Yell "Power's off right?"
Without waiting for an answer place cutters around cable and squeeze hard
<BNAG>
Distant voice "It is now"

RustyHinge

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Jul 23, 2022, 5:18:57 AMJul 23
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I also have a few neon testers for live AC...

Kerr-Mudd, John

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Jul 23, 2022, 5:45:55 AMJul 23
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On Sat, 23 Jul 2022 10:18:55 +0100
RustyHinge <rusty...@foobar.girolle.co.uk> wrote:

> On 23/07/2022 08:40, Thomas Prufer wrote:
> > On Fri, 22 Jul 2022 12:11:36 +0100, RustyHinge
> > <rusty...@foobar.girolle.co.uk> wrote:
> >
> >> Side cutter use not mandatory: I had a pair of wire-strippers. Plier
> >> type tool with two sharp vee slots which come together, leaving (if
> >> you've adjusted it right) a diamond-shaped hole approximately the size
> >> of the wire.
> >>
> >> Close the tool on the wire and enough of the insulation is cut to allow
> >> one to pull the wire through, stripped.
> >
> > I thought the mandatory method was: cut the presumed neutral and earth wires
> > simultaneously, and as some numpty miswired (compounded by not having isolated
> > the circuit, because) the resulting arc eats a conductor-sized notch into the
> > indicters...
>
> I also have a few neon testers for live AC...
>
A pal of mine's wire tracing method - connect one end of unknown wire to
mains and hunt around potential end points with one of those screwdrivers
with a bulb in it.

Ahem A Rivet's Shot

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Jul 23, 2022, 7:00:04 AMJul 23
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On Sat, 23 Jul 2022 10:46:06 +0100
"Kerr-Mudd, John" <ad...@127.0.0.1> wrote:

> A pal of mine's wire tracing method - connect one end of unknown wire to
> mains and hunt around potential end points with one of those screwdrivers
> with a bulb in it.

It's simla in principle to the way we identified all the pipejbex
left by the first fit plumber (who did a bunk) when it came time to hook it
all up - except we used the output of a compressor instead of the mains.

Nicholas D. Richards

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Jul 23, 2022, 7:01:08 AMJul 23
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In article <tbgee0$3pfek$1...@dont-email.me>, RustyHinge <rusty.hinge@fooba
r.girolle.co.uk> on Sat, 23 Jul 2022 at 10:18:55 awoke Nicholas from
his slumbers and wrote
>On 23/07/2022 08:40, Thomas Prufer wrote:
>> On Fri, 22 Jul 2022 12:11:36 +0100, RustyHinge
>> <rusty...@foobar.girolle.co.uk> wrote:
>>
>>> Side cutter use not mandatory: I had a pair of wire-strippers. Plier
>>> type tool with two sharp vee slots which come together, leaving (if
>>> you've adjusted it right) a diamond-shaped hole approximately the size
>>> of the wire.
>>>
>>> Close the tool on the wire and enough of the insulation is cut to allow
>>> one to pull the wire through, stripped.
>>
>> I thought the mandatory method was: cut the presumed neutral and earth wires
>> simultaneously, and as some numpty miswired (compounded by not having isolated
>> the circuit, because) the resulting arc eats a conductor-sized notch into the
>> indicters...
>
>I also have a few neon testers for live AC...
>
<Small voice, from the back> But how do you know that it is working,
unless it glows?
--
0sterc@tcher -

"Oů sont les neiges d'antan?"

RustyHinge

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Jul 23, 2022, 7:18:28 AMJul 23
to
Put my tongue on it first?

Brian

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Jul 23, 2022, 10:26:00 AMJul 23
to
soup <inv...@invalid.com> wrote:
> On 21/07/2022 16:32, Tone wrote:
>
>>
>> I suppose I'm lucky to have any of my own teeth at my age, but I was a
>> fluoridation kid.
>
> I hated that, every Monday morning at school, sloshing the Flouride
> liquid stuff around my teeth and gums then spitting it into a big bucket.
>
> It was supposed to be strawberry flavour, tasted like fuvg.
>
> Suppose it was a bit of an experiment "we'll get all these lower income
> kids to have brilliant teeth then when they get a job in some factory
> somewhere they won't need time off due to teeth problems"
>
> I can still imagine the taste of that penc today, (and yes the thought
> of it still makes me gag) nearly fifty-five years later.
>
>
>
>
> Sort of talking about it on mumsnet.
>
> https://www.mumsnet.com/talk/scotsnet/2458577-ANOTHER-strange-question-if-you-were-at-primary-school-in-the-70s
>
> Think the dates must be different in Strathclyde, it was late 60s(maybe
> early70s), here (Edinburgh, Scotland). I remember the dates as it was
> Primary and I started secondary in '73
>

I was lucky enough to live in an area with natural fluoride in the water.
In fact, I’m pretty sure our town was one used to support the research. The
other was north of the Tyne and their water came from another source, which
lacked fluorine.

Nicholas D. Richards

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Jul 23, 2022, 11:21:23 AMJul 23
to
In article <tbgle3$3r48q$3...@dont-email.me>, RustyHinge <rusty.hinge@fooba
r.girolle.co.uk> on Sat, 23 Jul 2022 at 12:18:27 awoke Nicholas from
his slumbers and wrote
>On 23/07/2022 12:00, Nicholas D. Richards wrote:
>> In article <tbgee0$3pfek$1...@dont-email.me>, RustyHinge <rusty.hinge@fooba
>> r.girolle.co.uk> on Sat, 23 Jul 2022 at 10:18:55 awoke Nicholas from
>> his slumbers and wrote
>>> On 23/07/2022 08:40, Thomas Prufer wrote:
>>>> On Fri, 22 Jul 2022 12:11:36 +0100, RustyHinge
>>>> <rusty...@foobar.girolle.co.uk> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Side cutter use not mandatory: I had a pair of wire-strippers. Plier
>>>>> type tool with two sharp vee slots which come together, leaving (if
>>>>> you've adjusted it right) a diamond-shaped hole approximately the size
>>>>> of the wire.
>>>>>
>>>>> Close the tool on the wire and enough of the insulation is cut to allow
>>>>> one to pull the wire through, stripped.
>>>>
>>>> I thought the mandatory method was: cut the presumed neutral and earth wires
>>>> simultaneously, and as some numpty miswired (compounded by not having
>isolated
>>>> the circuit, because) the resulting arc eats a conductor-sized notch into
>the
>>>> indicters...
>>>
>>> I also have a few neon testers for live AC...
>>>
>> <Small voice, from the back> But how do you know that it is working,
>> unless it glows?
>
>Put my tongue on it first?
>
That might light up my life, momentarily.

RustyHinge

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Jul 23, 2022, 12:15:36 PMJul 23
to
On 23/07/2022 15:25, Brian wrote:

>
> I was lucky enough to live in an area with natural fluoride in the water.
> In fact, I’m pretty sure our town was one used to support the research. The
> other was north of the Tyne and their water came from another source, which
> lacked fluorine.

The groundwater and that in the substrate roundarea round the Blackwater
and Colne estuaries and Maldon in Essex is especiall rich in fluoide(s):
so much so in fact it is positively brackish. This fact is used in a
detective story by (Dr) R. Austin Freeman, one of the first scientific
detective authors.

I commend the author's output.

maus

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Jul 23, 2022, 2:35:12 PMJul 23
to
On 2022-07-23, RustyHinge <rusty...@foobar.girolle.co.uk> wrote:
> On 23/07/2022 15:25, Brian wrote:
>
>>
>> I was lucky enough to live in an area with natural fluoride in the water.
>> In fact, I’m pretty sure our town was one used to support the research. The
>> other was north of the Tyne and their water came from another source, which
>> lacked fluorine.
>
> The groundwater and that in the substrate roundarea round the Blackwater
> and Colne estuaries and Maldon in Essex is especiall rich in fluoide(s):
> so much so in fact it is positively brackish. This fact is used in a
> detective story by (Dr) R. Austin Freeman, one of the first scientific
> detective authors.
>
> I commend the author's output.
>

I recall a story about someone in the US doing a survey correlating
water samples with psychatric problems, and found that somewhere in
Texas that had naturally heavily polluted water water (common in arid
areas) and that data was used to test patients reactions to that, and it
was found to have positive effects, so it was added to water everwhere,
then it was discovered it was useless. Anyone remember that?.


--
grey...@mail.com
"Are you sure that you can live on your investments after retirement?
If not, send us all your money."

John Williamson

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Jul 23, 2022, 6:29:41 PMJul 23
to
On 23/07/2022 19:35, maus wrote:

> I recall a story about someone in the US doing a survey correlating
> water samples with psychatric problems, and found that somewhere in
> Texas that had naturally heavily polluted water water (common in arid
> areas) and that data was used to test patients reactions to that, and it
> was found to have positive effects, so it was added to water everwhere,
> then it was discovered it was useless. Anyone remember that?.
>
>
The one I remember that is relevant to teeth is a study carried out in
Deaf Smith County, Texas.

In the 1930s,the people there were claimed by a local dentist to have
the least rotten teeth in the USA, and analysis showed a high
concentration of Fluoride (and other minerals) in the water and grain in
the area.

The theory was that by merely reproducing the fluoride content all over
the USA, they could solve the severe decay found elsewhere... It even
worked to a degree...

--
Tciao for Now!

John.

maus

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Jul 24, 2022, 3:22:27 AMJul 24
to
thanks for the answer. I will keep trying the remember more about that!.

Bernard Peek

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Jul 24, 2022, 4:58:02 AMJul 24
to
On 2022-07-23, RustyHinge <rusty...@foobar.girolle.co.uk> wrote:
> On 23/07/2022 15:25, Brian wrote:
>
>>
>> I was lucky enough to live in an area with natural fluoride in the water.
>> In fact, I’m pretty sure our town was one used to support the research. The
>> other was north of the Tyne and their water came from another source, which
>> lacked fluorine.
>
> The groundwater and that in the substrate roundarea round the Blackwater
> and Colne estuaries and Maldon in Essex is especiall rich in fluoide(s):
> so much so in fact it is positively brackish. This fact is used in a
> detective story by (Dr) R. Austin Freeman, one of the first scientific
> detective authors.
>
> I commend the author's output.
>
Complete works available electronically for half a zu on a certain river.

--
Bernard Peek
b...@shrdlu.com

RustyHinge

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Jul 24, 2022, 5:57:25 AMJul 24
to
Ta, might avadabble

maus

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Jul 24, 2022, 8:35:10 AMJul 24
to
I have a favourite author of decetivy books that wrote in the 1980's. I
keep thinking ``Why not ring him on Mobile?'', when the hero wants to
question somebody.

Don Stockbauer

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Jul 24, 2022, 9:03:26 AMJul 24
to
They've invented the telephone?????????????

Don Stockbauer

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Jul 24, 2022, 9:04:15 AMJul 24
to
We have the telephone here in America.

Sam Plusnet

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Jul 24, 2022, 2:30:01 PMJul 24
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On 24-Jul-22 14:04, Don Stockbauer wrote:

>> They've invented the telephone?????????????
>
> We have the telephone here in America.

Well stop hogging the thing and let other people use it!

--
Sam Plusnet

Mike Fleming

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Jul 25, 2022, 1:24:02 PMJul 25
to
Used to use mine for wire stripping but one of my lower fronts chipped
and the stripping no longer jbexed. I do have assorted wire strippers
now, including the grabbit and run type. However, I have only had to use
a hacksaw to strip a cable once, when we needed to run an RS232 cable
down a mineshaft. I volunteered to do the soldering and got given a
length of armoured multicore cable to which I had to affix a pair of
9-pin D-subs.

Mike Fleming

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Jul 25, 2022, 1:25:16 PMJul 25
to
On 21/07/2022 19:20, John Williamson wrote:
>
> Most places just added it to the drinking water at the works. My dad
> hated the idea, as he reckoned the flouride could also be used to kill
> rats.

Chlorine is added to swimming pools, and that was also used to kill people.

Richard Robinson

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Jul 25, 2022, 1:38:53 PMJul 25
to
Likewie dihydrogen oxide itself, of course.

--
Richard Robinson
"The whole plan hinged upon the natural curiosity of potatoes" - S. Lem

My email address is at http://qualmograph.org.uk/contact.html

John Williamson

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Jul 25, 2022, 4:33:53 PMJul 25
to
On 25/07/2022 18:38, Richard Robinson wrote:
> Mike Fleming said:
>> On 21/07/2022 19:20, John Williamson wrote:
>>>
>>> Most places just added it to the drinking water at the works. My dad
>>> hated the idea, as he reckoned the flouride could also be used to kill
>>> rats.
>>
>> Chlorine is added to swimming pools, and that was also used to kill people.
>
> Likewie dihydrogen oxide itself, of course.
>
Delightful stuff, not to be confused with hydrogen hydroxide...

Richard Robinson

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Jul 25, 2022, 5:28:34 PMJul 25
to
I wouldn't dream of it, Herr Kekulé.

chr...@privacy.net

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Jul 26, 2022, 7:10:17 AMJul 26
to
There's a game show idea!
Extreme Soldering!
I could do that!

Chris D

Peter

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Jul 26, 2022, 11:48:30 AMJul 26
to
"Chr...@privacy.net" <chr...@privacy.net> wrote in
news:jka0cn...@mid.individual.net:

>
> There's a game show idea!
> Extreme Soldering!
> I could do that!

I have soldered in many situations, but never on the summit of a mountain.

--
Peter
-----

Nicholas D. Richards

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Jul 26, 2022, 1:02:16 PMJul 26
to
In article <jka0cn...@mid.individual.net>, Chr...@privacy.net
<chr...@privacy.net> on Tue, 26 Jul 2022 at 12:10:15 awoke Nicholas
from his slumbers and wrote
Under water?

Mike Spencer

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Jul 26, 2022, 3:36:32 PMJul 26
to

"Nicholas D. Richards" <nich...@salmiron.com> writes:

> In article <jka0cn...@mid.individual.net>, Chr...@privacy.net
> <chr...@privacy.net> on Tue, 26 Jul 2022 at 12:10:15 awoke Nicholas
> from his slumbers and wrote
>
>> There's a game show idea!
>> Extreme Soldering!
>> I could do that!
>
> Under water?

Using metallic sodium wire as the solder!

--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada

Mike Fleming

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Jul 27, 2022, 6:55:11 AMJul 27
to
On 24/07/2022 09:58, Bernard Peek wrote:
Ta, 49p invested.

Richard Robinson

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Jul 27, 2022, 7:44:11 AMJul 27
to
Hmm. I think Iunforget that my grandfather had one of his on a
bookshelf. Or maybe someone else, but anyway, I was jung. I wasn't
impressed, but maybe it'd be worth another look. (I don't really go for
the complicated-technical-details style, which is my memory ot it. Or am
I confusing him with someone else ?)

RustyHinge

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Jul 27, 2022, 10:46:01 AMJul 27
to
On 27/07/2022 12:44, Richard Robinson wrote:

/R. Austin Freeman/

> Hmm. I think Iunforget that my grandfather had one of his on a
> bookshelf. Or maybe someone else, but anyway, I was jung. I wasn't
> impressed, but maybe it'd be worth another look. (I don't really go for
> the complicated-technical-details style, which is my memory ot it. Or am
> I confusing him with someone else ?)

Never thought of that author as over technical: accurate scientifically,
maybe, and with a readable style.

F'rinstance, notional writer noticing that the imprint of a circular
heel - [a onetime interesting method of evening-out (not evening out)
wear on the shoe] - hadn't moved, and deducing that the imprints were
intended to incriminate or exonerate somebody.

Richard Robinson

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Jul 27, 2022, 11:09:45 AMJul 27
to
RustyHinge said:
> On 27/07/2022 12:44, Richard Robinson wrote:
>
> /R. Austin Freeman/
>
>> Hmm. I think Iunforget that my grandfather had one of his on a
>> bookshelf. Or maybe someone else, but anyway, I was jung. I wasn't
>> impressed, but maybe it'd be worth another look. (I don't really go for
>> the complicated-technical-details style, which is my memory ot it. Or am
>> I confusing him with someone else ?)
>
> Never thought of that author as over technical: accurate scientifically,
> maybe, and with a readable style.
>
> F'rinstance, notional writer noticing that the imprint of a circular
> heel - [a onetime interesting method of evening-out (not evening out)
> wear on the shoe] - hadn't moved, and deducing that the imprints were
> intended to incriminate or exonerate somebody.

"oh, a _clue_" - Sam Vimes.

That sort of focus, yes. I'm half tempted to look for a relevant quote
from the Gentle Art of Murder, if I CBA to see if I can find it and
see. But probably not, I'm wittering on far too much already.

Jonathan Harston

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Aug 11, 2022, 10:19:05 AMAug 11
to
On Friday, 22 July 2022 at 12:11:38 UTC+1, RustyHinge wrote:
> Side cutter use not mandatory: I had a pair of wire-strippers. Plier
> type tool with two sharp vee slots which come together, leaving (if
> you've adjusted it right) a diamond-shaped hole approximately the size
> of the wire.
>
> Close the tool on the wire and enough of the insulation is cut to allow
> one to pull the wire through, stripped.

Blunt short kitchen kerniff. Blunt so's it doesn't cut the wire, knife-shaped so
it cuts through the insulation.

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