Make eye tests compulsory for older drivers, urges daughter of cyclist killed in crash

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swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 22, 2022, 9:46:24 AMSep 22
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The daughter of a Hampshire cyclist killed by a motorist whom it was revealed could only see three metres in front of himself has called for the law to be changed to make if compulsory for motorists over the age of 70 to have their eyesight tested when applying to renew their driving licence.

Peter Gardner, aged 82, was jailed for six months at Salisbury Crown Court after pleading guilty to causing the death by careless driving of 70-year-old cyclist Jim Tassell, who sustained a fatal head injury when the motorist crashed into the back of him on a country road in Andover on 23 July last year.

The court was told that Gardner could read a registration plate when it was three metres ahead of him, instead of the 20 metres required by law and Mr Tassell’s daughter, Emma Damen, is now calling for the law to be changed, reports Wales Online (link is external).

“Angry doesn’t even describe how I feel,” Mrs Damen said. “If you know your eyesight is that poor, how can you be so arrogant and selfish to just get in the car anyway?

“Without a doubt, my dad would have lived well into his 90s, if it wasn't for his selfish decision to get in that car.”

Currently, driving licences automatically expire when the holder reaches their 70th birthday.

They then need to be renewed every three years, with the holder being asked to complete a medical declaration and confirm that their eyesight meets the standards required for driving, with more details available on the website Older Drivers (link is external).

Calling on the law to be changed, Mrs Damen said: “All I am asking is that when you get to 70 and renew your licence, you should have an eyesight test.

“There needs to also be an onus on doctors and opticians to inform the DVLA (Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency) when someone’s health or eyesight deteriorates to the point that they are not fit to decide.

“My dad's death should never have happened and more people will die if we do not see change.

“How many more people have to die before the government will say ‘enough is enough; and put a new law in place?”

Mr Tassell, a retired accountant, was taken to hospital by emergency medical helicopter. He was put in an induced coma, with his life support machine switched off five days after the crash, and some of his organs were donated to help others.

Now, his daughter plans to take part in the Great South Run with her husband Glenn and brother Ben to raise money for the Hampshire & Isle of White Air Ambulance.

On her page on Just Giving (link is external), she wrote: “Ben, Glenn and I are running the Great South run in memory of Dad to raise as much as we can for the Hampshire & Isle of Wight Air Ambulance.

“They did everything they could to save Dad, although we didn’t get the outcome we so desperately wanted without them Dad would not have been able to donate his organs and save and change the lives of others.”

https://road.cc/content/news/make-eye-tests-compulsory-older-drivers-296091

JNugent

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Sep 22, 2022, 10:06:35 AMSep 22
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HRH Prince Del Boy Mason <swldx...@gmail.com> wrote:

> The daughter of a Hampshire cyclist killed by a motorist whom it was revealed could only see three metres in front of himself has called for the law to be changed to make if compulsory for motorists over the age of 70 to have their eyesight tested when applying to renew their driving licence.
> Peter Gardner, aged 82, was jailed for six months at Salisbury Crown Court after pleading guilty to causing the death by careless driving of 70-year-old cyclist Jim Tassell, who sustained a fatal head injury when the motorist crashed into the back of him on a country road in Andover on 23 July last year.
> The court was told that Gardner could read a registration plate when it was three metres ahead of him, instead of the 20 metres required by law and Mr Tassell’s daughter, Emma Damen, is now calling for the law to be changed, reports Wales Online (link is external).
> “Angry doesn’t even describe how I feel,” Mrs Damen said. “If you know your eyesight is that poor, how can you be so arrogant and selfish to just get in the car anyway?
> “Without a doubt, my dad would have lived well into his 90s, if it wasn't for his selfish decision to get in that car.”
> Currently, driving licences automatically expire when the holder reaches their 70th birthday.
> They then need to be renewed every three years, with the holder being asked to complete a medical declaration and confirm that their eyesight meets the standards required for driving, with more details available on the website Older Drivers (link is external).
> Calling on the law to be changed, Mrs Damen said: “All I am asking is that when you get to 70 and renew your licence, you should have an eyesight test.
> “There needs to also be an onus on doctors and opticians to inform the DVLA (Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency) when someone’s health or eyesight deteriorates to the point that they are not fit to decide.

"...not fit to decide" what?

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 22, 2022, 12:18:00 PMSep 22
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The problem, as always, is one of enforcement...and the need for self-enforcement as the better approach. There has been a requirement to meet a certain standard for sight for some time now...but I know of many who should, but prefer not to wear glasses as they seem to be utterly unable to link poor sight with the ablity to drive well. I guess it was the same years ago when having a few pints and then getting behind the wheel was just seen as normal. Having certain tests for various groups of people does didly squat if drivers then just ignore the results as the chances of being tested for sight at the side of the road are pretty much zero.

Spike

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Sep 22, 2022, 1:00:21 PMSep 22
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swldx...@gmail.com <swldx...@gmail.com> wrote:

> The daughter of a Hampshire cyclist killed by a motorist whom it was
> revealed could only see three metres in front of himself has called for
> the law to be changed to make if compulsory for motorists over the age of
> 70 to have their eyesight tested when applying to renew their driving licence.

> https://road.cc/content/news/make-eye-tests-compulsory-older-drivers-296091

Cyclists die in single-vehicle accidents, in part because they did not see
the item with which they collided. Compulsory eye tests would therefore
reduce these unfortunate deaths, which happen more frequently than cases
such as the sad one referred to above.


--
Spike

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 22, 2022, 1:29:38 PMSep 22
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Make everyone take a driving test when they reach pension age but make everyone take a theory test every five years. Most drivers admitted recently that they didn't even know the Highway Code had been changed.

Spike

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Sep 22, 2022, 2:00:07 PMSep 22
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ITYM ‘most people don’t know the Highway Code has changed’, since the
greatest number of road users (pedestrians, of course) have not chosen to
exert their place in the new hierarchy to any increased extent.

Perhaps you meant to say ‘Make everyone take a theory test’ every five
years? That would include cyclists, of course, who might then Mbe shocked
to discover that there are parts of the HC that don’t refer to them!

🙄

--
Spike

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 22, 2022, 2:01:27 PMSep 22
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A simple test would be sufficient to check someone's driving was still adequate, similar to the driver improvement courses offered to those caught speeding. Eyesight and health checks should be included too.

Spike

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Sep 22, 2022, 3:37:52 PMSep 22
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There are plenty of people about who took cycling courses at school. The
sort of thing for all cyclists to have to take, together with eyesight and
health checks, and a HC test. After all, cyclists kill people, sometimes
themselves too.

--
Spike

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 22, 2022, 3:52:48 PMSep 22
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I believe over 60 you get a free annual eye check (though I get confused as I don't remember signing a form last time).

The dilemma is if you make opticians responsible for reporting, people are reluctant to have their eyes checked, but if the default was suspension of licence unless you were signed off in possession of prescription that allowed you to see to the correct standard (with the appropriate punishments against lying professionals) then you'd solve that one, and it might work out cheaper as eye problems would be caught sooner with preventative checks.

Spike

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Sep 22, 2022, 6:30:57 PMSep 22
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This proposal doesn’t seem to bear much relation to reality, and it
probably has a very poor cost/benefit ratio, considering the very low
number of cases. The same arguments that have been made against cyclists
needing licences, registration, testing, and the rest. Sauce for the goose,
etc.

--
Spike

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 23, 2022, 5:49:27 AMSep 23
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On Thursday, September 22, 2022 at 8:52:48 PM UTC+1, swldx...@gmail.com wrote:
> I believe over 60 you get a free annual eye check (though I get confused as I don't remember signing a form last time).
>
> The dilemma is if you make opticians responsible for reporting, people are reluctant to have their eyes checked, but if the default was suspension of licence unless you were signed off in possession of prescription that allowed you to see to the correct standard (with the appropriate punishments against lying professionals) then you'd solve that one, and it might work out cheaper as eye problems would be caught sooner with preventative checks.

Can anyone see the opportunity for scammers to get stooges to take eye tests for lying drivers, like they do with driving tests?

Spike

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Sep 23, 2022, 7:43:53 AMSep 23
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Perhaps the people who cheat over such things took on board the message
that emerged from the cycling greats.


--
Spike

JNugent

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Sep 23, 2022, 7:50:05 AMSep 23
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There has been a requirement for the safety- and vision-related
accessories fitted to motor vehicles to meet a certain standard for
sight for some time now...but I know of one irresponsible and
sociopathic skinflint who would rather drive across a continent in a
vehicle with non-functioning windscreen wipers than pay out the money to
have them repaired and their function restored.

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 23, 2022, 9:24:23 AMSep 23
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Indeed, everyone should be re-tested every five years and if you fail, then you should be placed on a ristricted licence (no night time driving/less than 100BHP car/max one person in the car with you etc etc) and given six months to retake and pass the test. Fail for a second time, then back to a provisional.

The 15th of this month, marks the 37th anniversary of when I passed my test. There have been countless changes to road laws since and indeed roads are so different now than they were then. Its madness I've not been tested again.

JNugent

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Sep 23, 2022, 9:30:20 AMSep 23
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On 23/09/2022 02:24 pm, swldx...@gmail.com wrote:

> Indeed, everyone should be re-tested every five years and if you fail, then you should be placed on a ristricted licence (no night time driving/less than 100BHP car/max one person in the car with you etc etc) and given six months to retake and pass the test. Fail for a second time, then back to a provisional.
>
> The 15th of this month, marks the 37th anniversary of when I passed my test. There have been countless changes to road laws since and indeed roads are so different now than they were then. Its madness I've not been tested again.

In your case, it's hard not to agree that it IS madness that you have
not been tested again.

For your poor attitude to other road-users as much as for anything else.

Spike

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Sep 23, 2022, 9:48:58 AMSep 23
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You always have the option to take yourself off the road voluntarily;
because you might be losing your grip doesn’t mean we all should have to
suffer just because you won’t do the right thing.

--
Spike

Brian

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Sep 23, 2022, 9:58:47 AMSep 23
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France introduced a law ( I believe as of Jan 22) which requires vehicles
over 3.5T ( a large van) to display stickers either side near the front
and one at the rear. The stickers are about A4, or a bit a smaller. Google
Angle Morts for details.

No one seems to have considered:

1. A cyclist who can’t see a 3.5T vehicle shouldn’t be on the road.
2. A cyclist who can’t see a 3.5T vehicle certainly won’t see an A4
sticker.

The idiots, like swldxer, who demand these rules seem incapable of
considering the real world factors.



Brian

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Sep 23, 2022, 9:58:47 AMSep 23
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Fine, as long as cyclists are required to have insurance, number plates,
and eye tests.

I’d wager the cyclists wouldn’t agree.



swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 23, 2022, 12:03:32 PMSep 23
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A woman has been jailed after it was discovered she had taken around 150 practical and theory driving tests posing as other people.

Inderjeet Kaur, from Llanelli in South Wales took the tests for other people and travelled anywhere from Birmingham and London to Swansea and Carmarthen, to do so.

Between 2018 and 2020, Kaur took approximately 150 tests before staff at testing centres became suspicious and began to raise questions.

After a referral from the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) launched an investigation by the Tarian Regional Organised Crime Unit in Southern Wales.

Its enquiries revealed the 29-year-old had been offering her test services to driving applicants who struggled to understand English.

Kaur’s services weren’t cheap as it was revealed she charged £700 for a theory test and £800 for a practical driving test.

At Swansea Crown Court yesterday (Thursday 7 July), Kaur pleaded guilty and was jailed for eight months for organising and undertaking theory and practical driving test fraud.

Wales Online reports Judge Huw Rees said: “In my judgement this case has three strands. The first is the number of occasions you impersonated people between October 2019 and September 2020.

“Another is the extensive locations across Wales and England that you did this.

“And third is the many applicants you impersonated who had a poor grasp of English and had previously failed their driving tests.

“The result is that your offending means there are a large number of unqualified drivers on roads in this country. This is an undoubtedly serious and disturbing case.”

JNugent

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Sep 23, 2022, 12:52:21 PMSep 23
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Just think of all those fully-qualified fairy-cyclists pretending to be
drivers.

Spike

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Sep 23, 2022, 1:48:25 PMSep 23
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It’s amazing that cyclists are so unaware of the possibility of a negative
interaction with a large vehicle that /every such vehicle/ has to carry
multiple warning stickers!

Cyclists must be the dimmest of road users, and if this reflects the level
of their skills, then they shouldn’t be in the road in the first place.

--
Spike

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 23, 2022, 2:20:09 PMSep 23
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Report someone who is pretending to be someone else to take a theory or driving test for them.

It’s illegal to cheat at a driving or theory test by:

using an impersonator to take the test for you
impersonating a candidate and taking their test for them

Impersonators and people who use them can be:

sent to prison
banned from driving
ordered to carry out unpaid work
made to pay court costs

How to report someone

You can report someone by emailing DVSA.

DVSA counter-fraud and integrity team
c...@dvsa.gov.uk

Include as many of these details as possible:

names and addresses of the people
descriptions of what they look like
dates and times
where you found out about it, for example at a place or on social media

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) will investigate your report, but might not be able to tell you what happens.

JNugent

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Sep 23, 2022, 3:04:11 PMSep 23
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It's also illegal to drive a motor vehicle whose windscreen wipers don't
work.

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 23, 2022, 3:24:40 PMSep 23
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In short, yes. It is illegal for anyone to impersonate the named driver and take the practical driving test, the theory test or both. This may seem like a very obvious answer, but there are people who get, or in some cases, pay, other people to take parts of their driving test for them.

This isn’t a great idea, not only due to the penalties that exist for those who decide to impersonate drivers and the drivers themselves; there is also the danger aspect to it. Driving tests are designed to see whether people are safe to drive on the roads and not endanger the lives of other drivers, other road users and pedestrians. Getting someone else to take the test for you means that there is no way of knowing if you are actually going to be a danger and end up getting other people killed.

Those who have impersonated named drivers during the practical driving test, the theory test or both and the named drivers can face criminal conviction, trial in the criminal courts and prison sentences.

If the DVLA (Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency) or the DVSA (Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency) suspect that a named driver is being impersonated, then they will investigate immediately. If you know of or suspect that someone is impersonating a driver then you should report it to the DVSA. Also if you are approached by anyone offering to take either part of your driving license for you, you should report it immediately to the DVSA.

Remember, when you do pass, here at Insurance Revolution we can help get you on the road with affordable insurance for young and inexperienced drivers.

Spike

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Sep 23, 2022, 6:00:40 PMSep 23
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swldx...@gmail.com <swldx...@gmail.com> wrote:

> In short, yes. It is illegal for anyone to impersonate the named driver
> and take the practical driving test, the theory test or both. This may
> seem like a very obvious answer, but there are people who get, or in some
> cases, pay, other people to take parts of their driving test for them.

> This isn’t a great idea, not only due to the penalties that exist for
> those who decide to impersonate drivers and the drivers themselves; there
> is also the danger aspect to it. Driving tests are designed to see
> whether people are safe to drive on the roads and not endanger the lives
> of other drivers, other road users and pedestrians. Getting someone else
> to take the test for you means that there is no way of knowing if you are
> actually going to be a danger and end up getting other people killed.
>
> Those who have impersonated named drivers during the practical driving
> test, the theory test or both and the named drivers can face criminal
> conviction, trial in the criminal courts and prison sentences.
>
> If the DVLA (Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency) or the DVSA (Driver and
> Vehicle Standards Agency) suspect that a named driver is being
> impersonated, then they will investigate immediately. If you know of or
> suspect that someone is impersonating a driver then you should report it
> to the DVSA. Also if you are approached by anyone offering to take either
> part of your driving license [SIC] for you, you should report it immediately to the DVSA.
>
> Remember, when you do pass, here at Insurance Revolution we can help get
> you on the road with affordable insurance for young and inexperienced drivers.

🙄


--
Spike

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 24, 2022, 6:07:47 AMSep 24
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Dozens of learner drivers are caught each year using stand-ins to take their test for them, official figures show.

There were 209 convictions from 2012-13 to 2016-17, with more than half dealt with by the Metropolitan Police, Transport Minister Andrew Jones said.

In addition, 111 people were convicted of taking the practical or theory tests on behalf of others over the same time.

A total of about 1.5 million practical and 1.9 million theory tests are taken each year.

Mr Jones said the majority of investigations were conducted by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) until there was enough evidence to support an arrest and prosecution.

DVSA head of counter-fraud and investigations Andy Rice said: "The driving test is there to ensure that all drivers have the skills and knowledge to use the roads safely and responsibly.

"Anyone who tries to circumvent this process is putting innocent road users at risk."

Driving test fraud was a serious offence and dealt with accordingly, he said.

More than 1,100 licences have been revoked due to such activity in the past five years.

In September, a man was given a two-year prison sentence at Croydon Crown Court after taking a series of car, motorcycle and lorry theory tests on behalf of other people.

RAC Foundation director Steve Gooding said people hiring impersonators put everyone's lives at risk, because "neither we nor they have any idea whether their driving meets the required standard".

Driving safety was built on three pillars, he said - "roadworthy vehicles, responsibly driven by properly qualified drivers".

"This sort of behaviour is flagrantly kicking one of those pillars away."

The data was released in response to a parliamentary question by Lincoln MP Karl McCartney.

JNugent

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Sep 24, 2022, 6:31:10 AMSep 24
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It seems pretty clear that the penalties, as imposed at the sharp end,
as opposed to being theoretically available, are wholly inadequate.

The penalty imposed should be at least five years in prison - minimum -
for each party to such an illegal transaction, as well as an unlimited
fine and for parties with foreign citizenship, permanent deportation
after the prison sentence has been served in full and the fine paid.

Britain cannot and must not tolerate fully-qualified fairy-cyclists
imagining that they are entitled to drive motor vehicles.



Spike

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Sep 24, 2022, 6:59:25 AMSep 24
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When testing for cyclists comes into force, one wonders what the rate of
stand-ins would be - because it won’t be zero, will it.

--
Spike

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 24, 2022, 10:05:32 AMSep 24
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A learner driver has been jailed after attempting to get someone else to sit his theory test for him.

The impostor was caught after the 35-year old learner had given the man his provisional driving licence so he could sit the driving theory test.

Tabraiz Akhtar was hoping the man would successfully complete the theory test so he could then apply for his full licence.

But his plan was rumbled when a test centre manager spotted the man about sit the test did not match the picture on the provisional licence.

When he was interviewed, Akhtar said he had booked the test but he had lost his provisional licence.

He did not give an answer as to what the unknown man would have to gain by taking the test for him or how the man would have known the date and time to take the test, the court was told.

The offence was part of a growing number of similar crimes in which people were attempting cheat the theory test which could lead to unqualified drivers on the roads, a court has been told.
Had the unknown man been able to take the theory test Tabraiz Akhtar would have been able to apply for a full driving licence (Image: Getty)

Akhtar appeared at North Staffordshire Justice Centre and, via an interpreter, admitted having a provisional licence knowing it was designed or adapted for use in connection with fraud between July 31 and October 31, 2017.

Anton Balkitis, prosecuting on behalf of the Driving and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA), told the court that it had recently set up a counterfraud unit and had seen several successful prosecutions of people who have attempted to cheat the driving test process.

He said that criminals cheated the theory test in two ways - one by using a phone which connects to someone standing outside the test centre listening to the question provided, giving the cheat the appropriate answers.

The second way was by impersonation - which Akhtar has admitted.

Mr Balkitis said: "Both [ways] are organised by serial offenders targeting non-English speaking candidates [as in the case of Akhtar].

"This case arises on October 31, 2017, when a unknown man arrived at the test centre at Stoke to take the defendant's theory test.

"He produces himself as the defendant and had the provisional licence belonging to the defendant.

"The test centre manager looked at the photo on the licence and concluded he was not the man at the test centre. The test centre administrator corroborated her opinion and the man left the test centre, leaving the provisional licence belonging to the defendent.

"In March 2018 the DVSA hired inspectors to investigate the matter.

"An interview took place with the defendant in July 2018."

Mr Balkitis added: "He had not been able to prove the details of his booking.

"On completion of the test the candidate can apply for a full licence and it is widely accepted as a means of identification.

"The danger to the public and road users by unqualified drivers are obvious.

"The defendant is playing a [part in this] by providing his licence to another."

The court was told that the offence was not sophisticated and no actual harm was done.

The pre-sentence report found that Akthar, of Harcourt Street, Stoke, provided for his three young children, one of which suffers from a heart condition and that he has to travel to Birmingham Children's Hospital with them due to the child's medical issues.

It also found he had been working as a part-time chef at a takeaway but this information failed to sway magistrates from giving him an immediate custodial sentence.

The magistrates told Akhtar: "We have listened very carefully to the outline of this case.

"There was a degree of planning involved by yourself. You were fully aware of the risks you were taking in committing this fraud and the harm and risks that your actions would cause to pedestrians and other road users.

"We are therefore sentencing you to immediate custody for a period of 12 weeks, reduced to eight weeks to give you full credit for your early guilty plea in court today."

Akthar will also have to pay a victim surcharge of £115 and was jailed for eight weeks.

Spike

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Sep 24, 2022, 11:08:48 AMSep 24
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--
Spike

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 24, 2022, 12:02:21 PMSep 24
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For most of us taking the driving test was a fairly nerve-racking experience.

However, for many this isn't the case, as they're avoiding sitting the examination at all.

According to new data published by Transport Minister Andrew Jones, more than 40 learners are caught using an impersonator to take their driving test for them each year.
More than 40 people are convicted of trying to acquire a driving licence without sitting the theory or practical test, Transport Minister Andrew Jones has revealed

More than 40 people are convicted of trying to acquire a driving licence without sitting the theory or practical test, Transport Minister Andrew Jones has revealed

Figures revealed during parliamentary question showed that 209 people were convicted from 2012/13 to 2016/17 for attempting to acquire a driving licence without having sat the required tests.

A further 111 people were convicted of taking the practical or theory tests on behalf of others in the same period.

Motoring experts responded to he figure to by warning that offenders are putting 'everyone's lives at risk;.

More than half (53 per cent) of all cases were dealt with by the Metropolitan Police, Mr Jones confirmed.

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Steve Gooding, director of motoring research charity the RAC Foundation, told the Press Association: 'With only half of candidates passing their driving test first time, you can see why some could be tempted to guarantee their success by hiring an impersonator.

'By being prepared to get behind the wheel by fair means or foul, people hiring impersonators put everyone's lives at risk because neither we nor they have any idea whether their driving meets the required standard.

'Our strong road safety record is built on three pillars – roadworthy vehicles, responsibly driven by properly qualified drivers. This sort of behaviour is flagrantly kicking one of those pillars away.'
More than 1,100 licences have been revoked since 2012 for being obtained fraudulently

According to the data published by Mr Jones, more than 1,100 licences have been revoked due to evidence that they were obtained fraudulently in the last five years.

He added that the majority of investigations into impersonation are conducted by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) until there is enough evidence to support an arrest and prosecution.

In September 2016 a man was given a two-year prison sentence at Croydon Crown Court, south-east London, after taking a series of car, motorcycle and lorry theory tests on behalf of other people.

Andy Rice, the DVSA's head of counter-fraud and investigations, said: 'The driving test is there to ensure that all drivers have the skills and knowledge to use the roads safely and responsibly.

'Anyone who tries to circumvent this process is putting innocent road users at risk.

'Driving test fraud is a serious offence and is dealt with accordingly. We have stringent measures in place to detect fraudulent activity and work closely with the police to bring all offenders to justice.

'Thankfully, this type of crime is extremely rare.'
Some 209 people have been convicted for attempting to obtain a driving licence by allowing an impersonator to sit the test for them

Some 209 people have been convicted for attempting to obtain a driving licence by allowing an impersonator to sit the test for them.

Sarah Hill, partner and head of fraud at insurance and risk law firm BLM, said that despite conviction statistics being low in comparison to the number of tests taken each year, it doesn't take into account those who escape custody.

She said: 'Despite more than 1,100 people having their licenses revoked due to fraudulent activity in the last five years, just 20 per cent of those have received criminal convictions.

'This indicates a distinct lack of a deterrent when it comes to these types of offences, and government should look at its punishment guidelines for these fraudsters.

'Data over many years shows that organised fraudsters are involved and significant amounts of money are passing hands.

'The fraud extends beyond this, with the licences being used as part of subsequent sophisticated fraud affecting many more innocent victims, insurance companies and other businesses with proceeds and consequences that may be difficult to fully quantify.'

Approximately 1.5 million practical and 1.9 million theory tests are taken each year, according to DVSA stats.

Spike

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Sep 24, 2022, 1:33:34 PMSep 24
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--
Spike

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 24, 2022, 1:57:40 PMSep 24
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We’re all used to, by now, the debate which every so often gets dragged up by certain media outlets concerning the so-called need for cyclists to undergo compulsory training and to have a licence and insurance to ride on public roads.

Just last month, Scotland Tonight (link is external) kickstarted the latest ‘Should cyclists need licences?’ “discussion”, after hosting a debate in which a motoring journalist and cyclist went “head-to-head on whether road cycling should be regulated”.

That segment was soon followed up by Aberdeen-based newspaper The Press and Journal (link is external) asking its readers: “Should cycling on main roads be banned until you have a licence?”

South of the Tweed, CambridgeshireLive (link is external) ran a vox pop article the following week which featured insights from readers on whether cyclists should be required to have insurance, while that same day, Channel 4 show Steph’s Packed Lunch posted a Twitter poll (link is external) asking viewers if “cycling on main roads should be banned until you have a licence?”

The poll, which saw over 83 percent of participants vote against cycling licences, received plenty of criticism from active travel advocates, with one reply calling it “clickbait nonsense” and another “mad crankery”.

While the apparent need for cycling licences continues to rear its head in the media with increasing regularity (despite the government saying it has “no plans” to introduce legislation), it turns out that around 150 motorists were taking to the roads in London, Birmingham, Swansea, and Carmarthen during the last four years having not actually passed their driving test.

YorkshireLive has reported (link is external) that a 29-year-old woman from Llanelli, Carmarthenshire was jailed this week for eight months after admitting to taking roughly 150 theory and practical tests for other drivers across England and Wales between 2018 and 2020.

Inderjeet Kaur told Swansea Crown Court that she offered to take the tests for people who had difficulty speaking English.

She was arrested after suspicion grew at test centres that the 29-year-old was impersonating genuine candidates, prompting an investigation by police in South Wales.

Detective Chief Inspector Steven Maloney, who argued in court that Kaur was motivated by greed, said: “The crimes Kaur committed circumvent the driving test process and, in turn, put innocent road users at risk, by allowing unskilled and dangerous motorists to have seemingly legitimate licences.

“Safety on our roads has always been a priority and arresting those that flaunt the law ensures that we can keep unqualified drivers off the road.

“Frauds such as these pose significant risks to the general public, and I urge any members of the public with information on such crimes to report them to the police.”

Following Kaur’s sentencing, Caroline Hicks of the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency confirmed that the fraudulently-gained test passes could be cancelled and the licences of those who “passed” the tests revoked.

“DVSA’s priority is to protect everyone from unsafe drivers and vehicles,” Hicks said.

“Driving and theory tests exist to help ensure people have the correct knowledge, skills and attitude to drive on our roads.

“Circumventing the tests puts lives in danger.”

Spike

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Sep 24, 2022, 5:43:08 PMSep 24
to
swldx...@gmail.com <swldx...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Just last month, Scotland Tonight (link is external) kickstarted the
> latest ‘Should cyclists need licences?’ “discussion”, after hosting a
> debate in which a motoring journalist and cyclist went “head-to-head on
> whether road cycling should be regulated”.

One just has to look at how many Edinburgh cyclists get stuck in tramlines
and injure themselves. This doesn’t happen on the continent! Perhaps it
really is time that cyclists here were tested on their cycling skills. Some
eye tests wouldn’t go amiss either.


--
Spike

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 25, 2022, 6:08:41 AMSep 25
to
Swallaxadin Abdul Bashir, 42, attempted to sit tests while impersonating applicants at 12 locations across England between October 2018 to August 2019, the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) said.

Bashir, from Coventry, was jailed at Warwick Crown Court on Wednesday after committing the offences in Nottingham, Scunthorpe, Sunderland, Middlesbrough, Gloucester, Cheltenham, Salisbury, York, St Helens, Cambridge, Southport and Manchester.

Theory centre staff reported the incidents to the DVSA's fraud investigation team after having suspicions that he was impersonating the genuine candidates whilst taking the tests.
Swallaxadin Abdul Bashir, 42, who has been jailed for 28 months at Warwick Crown Court for trying to sit other people's driving theory testS.

Staff rejected all pass results from the tests that he carried out and in some cases he was turned away before taking the test, the DVSA said.

Bashir pleaded guilty to the offences at an earlier court hearing, which was told that investigators found evidence of people booking tests with him on his mobile phone.

West Midlands Police supported the investigation and searched Bashir's home and another property connected to him, finding distinctive items of clothing that were captured on test centre CCTV.

Bashir was previously jailed for 18 months in 2017 and two years in July 2016, and was handed a six-month suspended sentence in February 2014 for similar offences.

A court hearing in August 2017, also held at Warwick Crown Court, was told Bashir was a "one-trick pony" who had offered services to driving test applicants who had difficulty with the English language.

Andy Rice, the DVSA's head of counter fraud and investigation, said: "Theory tests are a vital way of assessing if people have the right driving knowledge and attitude to drive safely.

"Working with other agencies, we make every effort to prosecute theory test fraudsters and this significant prison sentence shows the impact of this work."

Ongoing investigations are taking place to locate and prosecute people who paid Bashir to carry out the tests on their behalf.

JNugent

unread,
Sep 25, 2022, 6:21:59 AMSep 25
to
More attempted deception from Prince Del Boy.

"YorkshireLive has reported (link is external) that a 29-year-old woman
from Llanelli, Carmarthenshire was jailed this week for eight months
after admitting to taking roughly 150 theory and practical tests for
other drivers across England and Wales between 2018 and 2020."

That should read:

YorkshireLive has reported (link is external) that a 29-year-old woman
from Llanelli, Carmarthenshire was jailed this week for eight months
after admitting to taking roughly 150 theory and practical tests for
other fully-qualified fairy-cyclists across England and Wales between
2018 and 2020.

JNugent

unread,
Sep 25, 2022, 6:24:11 AMSep 25
to
On 24/09/2022 03:05 pm, swldx...@gmail.com wrote:

> A learner driver has been jailed after attempting to get someone else to sit his theory test for him.

TRANSLATION: "A fully-qualified fairy-cyclist has been jailed after
attempting to get someone else to sit his [driving] theory test for him
[so that he could impersonate a driver]".

JNugent

unread,
Sep 25, 2022, 6:25:57 AMSep 25
to
On 24/09/2022 05:02 pm, swldx...@gmail.com wrote:

> For most of us taking the driving test was a fairly nerve-racking experience.

Speak for yourself.

First time pass here, after six lessons.

Spike

unread,
Sep 25, 2022, 6:50:14 AMSep 25
to

Approximately 1.5 million practical and 1.9 million theory tests are taken
each year, according to DVSA stats.

So adding in tests for cyclists should be quite straightforward despite all
their blathering on the subject.

Bring it on…


--
Spike

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 25, 2022, 8:35:54 AMSep 25
to
Learner-driver insurer Veygo has revealed that impersonation-style cheating on driving tests is on the rise and is the highest it has been in the last five years, with 1,195 reported cases in 2022. This is an 83% increase in reports compared to 654 incidences in 2017.

Fraudulently passing either tests can result in revoked certificates, loss of licence and prosecution. Impersonations in driving tests means fraudulently sending someone else to fill in as you for a theory or practical driving test.

Technology-assisted cheating in theory tests, however, is on the decline, with it happening 2.8 times more in 2017 than it is now in 2022. Using a mobile phone or other technology aids to help pass a theory test on the sly has steadily decreased each year since, and is now 64% lower than it was five years ago.

The DVSA carries out two million theory tests each year, so technology-assisted cheating now has an extremely low incidence rate of 0.008%. But Veygo is highlighting that the driving test backlog is adding extra pressure on youngsters to pass their tests:

James Armstrong, CEO of Veygo said: “The pandemic caused a backlog in theory and practical tests that is still being felt, with a total of around 2.4 million tests rolled over this year so far, according to ONS predictions for January - August 2022. Many young drivers are still desperate to pass their tests and get on the road – the travelling, convenience and social freedom that driving allows is so close for learners.

“Sadly, impersonation cheating in tests has risen to a record high, and we suspect, this is partly due to the eagerness of learners to pass first time and quickly. As failing your test means added retake costs, and re-joining a waiting list for a theory or practical test. But cheating certainly isn’t the way to fast-track the process.

“We want to remind learners, and all drivers, that driving on the road carries responsibilities and certain standards, and to fraudulently pass a test could cause danger to others, and yourself. Keeping the roads safe for learners, new drivers and all road users is a priority. If you want to pass quickly, make sure you’re doing it legitimately by following our guidance.”

Spike

unread,
Sep 25, 2022, 8:56:35 AMSep 25
to

> “We want to remind learners, and all drivers, that driving on the road
> carries responsibilities and certain standards, and to fraudulently pass
> a test could cause danger to others, and yourself. Keeping the roads safe
> for learners, new drivers and all road users is a priority. If you want
> to pass quickly, make sure you’re doing it legitimately by following our guidance.”

Much the same could be said for (unlicensed, untested, untaxed) cyclists.

--
Spike

swldx...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 25, 2022, 9:09:56 AMSep 25
to

>
QUOTE: “Sadly, impersonation cheating in tests has risen to a record high, and we suspect, this is partly due to the eagerness of learners to pass first time and quickly. As failing your test means added retake costs, and re-joining a waiting list for a theory or practical test. But cheating certainly isn’t the way to fast-track the process. ENDS

Do these impersonators keep up to date with the new HC?

Spike

unread,
Sep 25, 2022, 9:32:46 AMSep 25
to
Do cyclists keep up to date with the new HC?

They hardly acknowledge the existence of pedestrians let alone their place
at the top of the hierarchy. It suggests they need theory and practical
tests before being unleashed on the public.

--
Spike

TMS320

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Sep 25, 2022, 10:32:58 AMSep 25
to
On 23/09/2022 14:58, Brian wrote:
>
> France introduced a law ( I believe as of Jan 22) which requires
> vehicles over 3.5T ( a large van) to display stickers either side
> near the front and one at the rear. The stickers are about A4, or a
> bit a smaller. Google Angle Morts for details.
>
> No one seems to have considered:

Oh, I expect they have realised that car drivers can be pretty dim on
multi-lane roads/roundabouts etc, so need reminding not to linger
alongside lorries.

Spike

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Sep 25, 2022, 11:15:11 AMSep 25
to
If that’s what you think, then you’ve proved that you can’t even understand
simple graphics. Should you be on the road at all?


--
Spike

swldx...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 25, 2022, 11:23:57 AMSep 25
to
On Sunday, September 25, 2022 at 3:32:58 PM UTC+1, TMS320 wrote:

> Oh, I expect they have realised that car drivers can be pretty dim on
> multi-lane roads/roundabouts etc, so need reminding not to linger
> alongside lorries.

Motorists have been describing their hair-raising experiences of the Stoneferry roundabout in east Hull, after a number of near misses.

The roundabout has a new layout and it seems not everyone has got to grips with it. One driver posting on the Hull Traffic & Travel Facebook group went as far as to draw a diagram explaining how he thought fellow motorists should navigate it.

Kris Johansson wrote: "I'm sick to death of nearly been wiped out by idiots on the road that don't understand the new road layout at B&Q roundabout! ... IT'S NOW 3 LANES.

https://www.hulldailymail.co.uk/whats-on/whats-on-news/drivers-warn-chaotic-stoneferry-roundabout-7584439#comments-wrapper

Mike Collins

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Sep 26, 2022, 9:40:50 AMSep 26
to
On Thursday, 22 September 2022 at 14:46:24 UTC+1, swldx...@gmail.com wrote:
> The daughter of a Hampshire cyclist killed by a motorist whom it was revealed could only see three metres in front of himself has called for the law to be changed to make if compulsory for motorists over the age of 70 to have their eyesight tested when applying to renew their driving licence.
>
> Peter Gardner, aged 82, was jailed for six months at Salisbury Crown Court after pleading guilty to causing the death by careless driving of 70-year-old cyclist Jim Tassell, who sustained a fatal head injury when the motorist crashed into the back of him on a country road in Andover on 23 July last year.
>
> The court was told that Gardner could read a registration plate when it was three metres ahead of him, instead of the 20 metres required by law and Mr Tassell’s daughter, Emma Damen, is now calling for the law to be changed, reports Wales Online (link is external).
>
> “Angry doesn’t even describe how I feel,” Mrs Damen said. “If you know your eyesight is that poor, how can you be so arrogant and selfish to just get in the car anyway?
>
> “Without a doubt, my dad would have lived well into his 90s, if it wasn't for his selfish decision to get in that car.”
>
> Currently, driving licences automatically expire when the holder reaches their 70th birthday.
>
> They then need to be renewed every three years, with the holder being asked to complete a medical declaration and confirm that their eyesight meets the standards required for driving, with more details available on the website Older Drivers (link is external).
>
> Calling on the law to be changed, Mrs Damen said: “All I am asking is that when you get to 70 and renew your licence, you should have an eyesight test.
>
> “There needs to also be an onus on doctors and opticians to inform the DVLA (Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency) when someone’s health or eyesight deteriorates to the point that they are not fit to decide.
>
> “My dad's death should never have happened and more people will die if we do not see change.
>
> “How many more people have to die before the government will say ‘enough is enough; and put a new law in place?”
>
> Mr Tassell, a retired accountant, was taken to hospital by emergency medical helicopter. He was put in an induced coma, with his life support machine switched off five days after the crash, and some of his organs were donated to help others.
>
> Now, his daughter plans to take part in the Great South Run with her husband Glenn and brother Ben to raise money for the Hampshire & Isle of White Air Ambulance.
>
> On her page on Just Giving (link is external), she wrote: “Ben, Glenn and I are running the Great South run in memory of Dad to raise as much as we can for the Hampshire & Isle of Wight Air Ambulance.
>
> “They did everything they could to save Dad, although we didn’t get the outcome we so desperately wanted without them Dad would not have been able to donate his organs and save and change the lives of others.”
>
> https://road.cc/content/news/make-eye-tests-compulsory-older-drivers-296091

Why just older drivers?

swldx...@gmail.com

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Sep 26, 2022, 11:50:48 AMSep 26