Who are the bad guys? British Police given the go ahead to hack into private computers without asking.

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Lee

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Jan 29, 2009, 10:59:50 AM1/29/09
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Britain Lets Police Hack PCs Without Warrants

Britain's Home Office has quietly adopted a new plan to let police routinely
hack into people's personal computers without a warrant.
The move, which follows a decision by the European Union's council of
ministers in Brussels, has angered civil liberties groups and opposition
members of Parliament. They described it as a sinister extension of the
surveillance state which drives "a coach and horses" through privacy laws.


http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,476904,00.html

William Black

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Jan 29, 2009, 12:13:03 PM1/29/09
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"Lee" <m...@localhost.com> wrote in message
news:Unkgl.17948$6j1...@newsfe24.ams2...

Ubuntu...

--
William Black


I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Barbeques on fire by the chalets past the castle headland
I watched the gift shops glitter in the darkness off the Newborough gate
All these moments will be lost in time, like icecream on the beach
Time for tea.

True Blue

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Jan 29, 2009, 12:24:21 PM1/29/09
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"Lee" <m...@localhost.com> wrote in message
news:Unkgl.17948$6j1...@newsfe24.ams2...
> Britain Lets Police Hack PCs Without Warrants
>
> Britain's Home Office has quietly adopted a new plan to let police
> routinely hack into people's personal computers without a warrant.
> The move, which follows a decision by the European Union's council of
> ministers in Brussels, has angered civil liberties groups and opposition
> members of Parliament.

Not that it will anger those opposition MPs into finally waking up to who
actually runs this country.

Lee

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Jan 29, 2009, 11:37:42 PM1/29/09
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"William Black" <willia...@hotmail.co.uk> wrote in message
news:glsolm$hnb$2...@news.motzarella.org...

>
> "Lee" <m...@localhost.com> wrote in message
> news:Unkgl.17948$6j1...@newsfe24.ams2...
>> Britain Lets Police Hack PCs Without Warrants
>>
>> Britain's Home Office has quietly adopted a new plan to let police
>> routinely hack into people's personal computers without a warrant.
>> The move, which follows a decision by the European Union's council of
>> ministers in Brussels, has angered civil liberties groups and opposition
>> members of Parliament. They described it as a sinister extension of the
>> surveillance state which drives "a coach and horses" through privacy
>> laws.
>
> Ubuntu...

A step in the right direction.

Lee

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Jan 29, 2009, 11:40:40 PM1/29/09
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"True Blue" <garyb...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:Ea6dnUUFROrRexzU...@giganews.com...

When NuLabour finally get kicked it will be interesting to see if their
successors actually put their money were their mouths are and turn of some
of the privacy ignoring features of Labours big brother state.

William Black

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Jan 31, 2009, 4:10:34 AM1/31/09
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"Lee" <m...@localhost.com> wrote in message
news:ouvgl.18273$6j1....@newsfe24.ams2...

What's really interesting is that a UK government agency publishes a list of
software and equipment that is able to resist such attacks.

It is called ITSEC and there's a shed load of publications including a list
of approved devices and systems...

The only M$ operating system on the list is Windoze NT...

Dead Paul

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Jan 31, 2009, 7:50:12 AM1/31/09
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On Sat, 31 Jan 2009 14:40:34 +0530, William Black wrote:

>
> "Lee" <m...@localhost.com> wrote in message
> news:ouvgl.18273$6j1....@newsfe24.ams2...
>>
>> "William Black" <willia...@hotmail.co.uk> wrote in message
>> news:glsolm$hnb$2...@news.motzarella.org...
>>>
>>> "Lee" <m...@localhost.com> wrote in message
>>> news:Unkgl.17948$6j1...@newsfe24.ams2...
>>>> Britain Lets Police Hack PCs Without Warrants
>>>>
>>>> Britain's Home Office has quietly adopted a new plan to let police
>>>> routinely hack into people's personal computers without a warrant. The
>>>> move, which follows a decision by the European Union's council of
>>>> ministers in Brussels, has angered civil liberties groups and
>>>> opposition members of Parliament. They described it as a sinister
>>>> extension of the surveillance state which drives "a coach and horses"
>>>> through privacy laws.
>>>
>>> Ubuntu...
>>
>> A step in the right direction.
>
> What's really interesting is that a UK government agency publishes a list
> of software and equipment that is able to resist such attacks.
>
> It is called ITSEC and there's a shed load of publications including a
> list of approved devices and systems...
>
> The only M$ operating system on the list is Windoze NT...

The ITSEC website is unavailable and the only references to ITSEC I found
where they mentioned NT was dated 1999. It would be nice to have a URL
with some recent software/hardware recommendations.

--
___ _______ ___ ___ ___ __ ____
/ _ \/ __/ _ | / _ \ / _ \/ _ |/ / / / /
/ // / _// __ |/ // / / ___/ __ / /_/ / /__
/____/___/_/ |_/____/ /_/ /_/ |_\____/____/

Lee

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Jan 31, 2009, 4:41:16 AM1/31/09
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"William Black" <willia...@hotmail.co.uk> wrote in message
news:gm14ir$eh0$1...@news.motzarella.org...

>
> "Lee" <m...@localhost.com> wrote in message
> news:ouvgl.18273$6j1....@newsfe24.ams2...
>>
>> "William Black" <willia...@hotmail.co.uk> wrote in message
>> news:glsolm$hnb$2...@news.motzarella.org...
>>>
>>> "Lee" <m...@localhost.com> wrote in message
>>> news:Unkgl.17948$6j1...@newsfe24.ams2...
>>>> Britain Lets Police Hack PCs Without Warrants
>>>>
>>>> Britain's Home Office has quietly adopted a new plan to let police
>>>> routinely hack into people's personal computers without a warrant.
>>>> The move, which follows a decision by the European Union's council of
>>>> ministers in Brussels, has angered civil liberties groups and
>>>> opposition members of Parliament. They described it as a sinister
>>>> extension of the surveillance state which drives "a coach and horses"
>>>> through privacy laws.
>>>
>>> Ubuntu...
>>
>> A step in the right direction.
>
> What's really interesting is that a UK government agency publishes a list
> of software and equipment that is able to resist such attacks.
>
> It is called ITSEC and there's a shed load of publications including a
> list of approved devices and systems...
>
> The only M$ operating system on the list is Windoze NT...

Wasn't NT the first incarnation of the NTFS file system perhaps they were
pointing to that, in MS terms it was a move in the right direction with
security if a bit flawed initially.

If I needed hacker proof stuff (police included) on my PC I think the
simplest route is to store it on a USB drive and simply unplug it when not
in use.

William Black

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Jan 31, 2009, 12:27:23 PM1/31/09
to

"Dead Paul" <dead...@no.reply> wrote in message
news:gm1he4$pog$1...@news.datemas.de...

http://www.commoncriteriaportal.org/products.html

Is a lot more up todate.

I see Vista is listed but with a low security level.

XP's there in it's server version.

They do seem to like Linux though...

Scotius

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Feb 1, 2009, 6:15:21 PM2/1/09
to

I hope some clever hackers teach them a lesson they won't
forget.

Trespasser

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Feb 2, 2009, 3:19:01 AM2/2/09
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"Scotius" <yoda...@mnsi.net> wrote in message
news:t7bco45hifgpuof0t...@4ax.com...


To be honest is it really that worrying?

I mean lets face it, most police forces cant be bothered to fight crime on their own
doorstep or turn out when assistance is needed. If you try reporting suspicious sites to
them that potentially contain 'kiddy pictures' your met with a blank expression. 'And who
are they employing to 'hack computers'? Don't think for a minute that that they'll use
skript kiddies, they'll go for IT professionals who cost a fortune and will drain the
police budget, then someone will have to massage yearly figures to prove these guys are
financially viable.

Also given the amount of unsecured wireless networks around, and those still using wep
encryption ...... proving crime is pointless.

--
Regards
Trespasser
---------------------
As long as government is perceived as working for the benefit of children, the people
happily will endure almost any curtailment of liberty.

I'm not paranoid, I use someone else's wireless network

I am not a free man, I am a number on someone's database

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

Http://digitalgrudge.no-ip.org

----------------------------


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