Machines

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Stuart Rosen

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Aug 28, 2001, 4:00:51 AM8/28/01
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Being desperate, having had CFS/ME for so many years, I recently tried
something new.

I went to see a nutritionist with a machine called a QXCI. This machine is
supposed to be able to diagnose imbalances, intolerances, allergies,
deficiencies and more beside.

The practitioner says that she herself was a sufferer of CFS/ME and it was
as a result of using this machine that she is well today.

Let me tell you the consultations are expensive (£75 each visit) and the
supplements prescribed were even more so.

Interestingly some of what came out of the consultations did seem to ring
true and one or two of my symptoms have become less pronounced, however I
don't think I gave it enough time to do more than that (due to the cost).

I am also acutely aware of the feeling that this is one more piece of
Charlatanism. If you check it out in www.Quackwatch.com the inventor of the
machine (William C Nelson) is credited with being a member of American
Nutritional Medical Association (ANMA), which Quackwatch claims offers
"phoney health related credentials". Countering this, elsewhere it is stated
that he has numerous bona fide credentials, (professor, medical doctor,
worked on the NASA programme etc).

I am deeply suspisious of this in the same way that I am about homeopathy,
colour therapy etc but also would like to no more.

Does anybody else have any experience of Bio-Electro medicine as this is
being called?

Stuart


Peter Parry

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Aug 28, 2001, 2:52:20 PM8/28/01
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On Tue, 28 Aug 2001 09:00:51 +0100, "Stuart Rosen"
<DrSt...@theoffice.fsnet.co.uk> wrote:


>I am also acutely aware of the feeling that this is one more piece of
>Charlatanism.

It is, one enormous piece of charlatanism. To quote from one of
their many sites :-

"Surrogate testing can be done on infants with the harness connected
to the mother and the child in the mothers arms."

"...use the virtual radionic modes for the subspace link."

"his Device has an auto focus bioresonance aspect"

"Disclaimer: Do not use this device for medical diagnosis."

"Amazingly, you do not have to be physically present to benefit from
this sophisticated computerized health system. Distance appointments
are available as the QXCI system is capable of reading your own
personal energetic patterns from anywhere in the world".

It's a fraud, pure unadulterated first rate snake oil.

>If you check it out in www.Quackwatch.com the inventor of the
>machine (William C Nelson) is credited with being a member of American
>Nutritional Medical Association (ANMA), which Quackwatch claims offers
>"phoney health related credentials".

Correct, there are several other references to this organisation.

>Countering this, elsewhere it is stated
>that he has numerous bona fide credentials, (professor, medical doctor,
>worked on the NASA programme etc).

Nelson (depending upon where you look) claims doctorates in medicine,
homeopathy, naturopathy, science, business, and international law
amongst others. Some come from the bogus "Lafayette University" (not
to be confused with the genuine University of Louisiana at Lafayette
and others of similar name) a fraudulent "degree mill". He variously
describes himself as a professor and doctor.

It's a variation on the long running Vega fraud and "allergen
testing".

--
Peter Parry.
http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/

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