I'm Sorry I'll Read That Again

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Brian Taylor

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May 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/2/98
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I'd like to hear from other fans of good old Radio Prune. No-one I know
has even heard of this 60s/70s radio comedy programme.

Please...there must be someone out there!

email is bta...@btinternet.com, or post to this newsgroup.

Brian Watson

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May 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/2/98
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Brian Taylor wrote in message <01bd7560$4853bec0$ce3163c3@default>...

>I'd like to hear from other fans of good old Radio Prune. No-one I know
>has even heard of this 60s/70s radio comedy programme.

Might I suggest you start hanging around with an older group of friends.

:-)

--
Brian Watson

Driving an overpowered electronic rollercoaster down the road to Hell.

Phil Joyce

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May 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/2/98
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My Name is Angus Prune and this is My tune,
I said I'm sorry I'll read that again.
I sit in my bath and I have a good laugh,
as I listen to the program named after me.

My Name is Angus Prune and this is My tune,

I- S- I- R- T- A - I said I'm sorry I'll read that again.


Nah, never heard of it. (who is Lady Constance anyway??)


Cheers, Phil.


In article <01bd7560$4853bec0$ce3163c3@default>, Brian Taylor
<Bta...@btinternet.com> writes


>I'd like to hear from other fans of good old Radio Prune. No-one I know
>has even heard of this 60s/70s radio comedy programme.
>

>Please...there must be someone out there!
>
>email is bta...@btinternet.com, or post to this newsgroup.

-- I didn't go to university. Didn't even finish A-levels. But I have sympathy
for those who did. -- (Terry Pratchett, alt.fan.pratchett)


Phil Joyce

Graham Higgins

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May 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/2/98
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Brian Taylor <Bta...@btinternet.com> wrote:

> I'd like to hear from other fans of good old Radio Prune. No-one I know
> has even heard of this 60s/70s radio comedy programme.
>
> Please...there must be someone out there!

My 13-year-old son is a fan on the strength of one tape of the
ISIRTA reunion and another from an LP long-lost but preserved as a tape
I had at college. He can also do complete Glums scripts if not stifled.
I'm sure BBC tapes have put out some ISIRTA.
I think of ISIRTA as the last *radio* comedy show we
collectively discussed next day in the school yard. Already TV was
becoming the childrens' medium ('Do not Adjust Your Set' and Julian
Chagrin's 'A Man and a Dog' were proto-Python).
Odd to think it was 'new wave' comedy at the time('irreverent
satire' became Radio Times' catch all for 'what's this?') in contrast to
Round The Horne, Al Read, or The Clitheroe Kid.
Everyone could do a Lady Constance de Coverlet or Grimbling the
butler, and John 'Otto' Cleese in the John and Mary sketches was the
mutt's nuts, already refining his line in cruel cool.
For a while, just dropping '...be that as it may' into a heated
discussion was enough to raise a laugh, unbelievably.
Do kids still do funny voices? I hear them doing soundbite-
length Fast Show catchphrases, but they seem generally too
self-conscious to clown about.
ISIRTA was like a surrogate gang for grammar school boys, like
Top Cat or the Bash St. Kids were. And we all fancied Jo Kendal.
You may think you're a dreamer, but you're not the only one...


G.

--
"Don't let it be like this... tell them I said something.'
+Pancho Villa's last words+

Crimond98

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May 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/2/98
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In article <01bd7560$4853bec0$ce3163c3@default>, "Brian Taylor"
<Bta...@btinternet.com> writes:

>I'd like to hear from other fans of good old Radio Prune. No-one I know
>has even heard of this 60s/70s radio comedy programme.
>
>Please...there must be someone out there!

Yep. I've heard of it. I'm not really a fan though but I liked listening to it.

Robert

Mike McMillan

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May 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/2/98
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In article <01bd7560$4853bec0$ce3163c3@default>, Brian Taylor
<URL:mailto:Bta...@btinternet.com> wrote:
> I'd like to hear from other fans of good old Radio Prune. No-one I know
> has even heard of this 60s/70s radio comedy programme.
>
> Please...there must be someone out there!
>
> email is bta...@btinternet.com, or post to this newsgroup.
>

Of course there is! Do you remember their awkward attempt at a play on words
for The Sound of Music? They had an old weaving mill full of dogs
(Daschounds I think it was) (by some very curious story line or other) the
end result was the team singing 'The Mills are alive with the Hounds of
Munich'.

'I'll lie in my bath and I'll have a good laugh . . . or somesuch!

Toodle Pip,

Mike (DOB 26/09/47)

--
Mike McMillan: 'The pictures on Radio are far superior to those on any
Television programme!'
Feeling Bored? Why not visit: http://www.mikesounds.demon.co.uk/


Cerumen

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May 3, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/3/98
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Yes I certainly remember listening to it while based in Jeddah in Saudi
Arabia mid 70's, it was even funnier because someone had sold it to Saudi
Broadcasting and I am sure their censors never understood the innuendo or it
would have never been broadcast. Chris Doe

Don Amott

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May 3, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/3/98
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Puffing and blowing, with mighty consumption of ale, Mike McMillan
<Mi...@mikesounds.demon.co.uk> writes

>Do you remember their awkward attempt at a play on words
>for The Sound of Music? They had an old weaving mill full of dogs
>(Daschounds I think it was) (by some very curious story line or other) the
>end result was the team singing 'The Mills are alive with the Hounds of
>Munich'.

"Hans' neice, Anne Bumpsidaisy"

Bill Oddie's fault, that one.
________________________________________________________

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Chris J Dixon

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May 4, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/4/98
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Don Amott wrote:

>Puffing and blowing, with mighty consumption of ale, Mike McMillan
><Mi...@mikesounds.demon.co.uk> writes
>>Do you remember their awkward attempt at a play on words
>>for The Sound of Music? They had an old weaving mill full of dogs
>>(Daschounds I think it was) (by some very curious story line or other) the
>>end result was the team singing 'The Mills are alive with the Hounds of
>>Munich'.
>
>"Hans' neice, Anne Bumpsidaisy"

Or the time they discovered a library at the end of one of the
legs of the Electric Time Trousers... "That's a turnup for the
books".

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
chris...@easynet.co.uk

Have dancing shoes, will ceilidh.

Jim Easterbrook

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May 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/5/98
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In article <354eef53...@news.easynet.co.uk>, Chris J Dixon (chris...@easynet.co.uk) wrote:
>Don Amott wrote:
>
>>Puffing and blowing, with mighty consumption of ale, Mike McMillan
>><Mi...@mikesounds.demon.co.uk> writes
>>>Do you remember their awkward attempt at a play on words
>>>for The Sound of Music? They had an old weaving mill full of dogs
>>>(Daschounds I think it was) (by some very curious story line or other) the
>>>end result was the team singing 'The Mills are alive with the Hounds of
>>>Munich'.
>>
>>"Hans' neice, Anne Bumpsidaisy"
>
>Or the time they discovered a library at the end of one of the
>legs of the Electric Time Trousers... "That's a turnup for the
>books".

ROFL!

"Henry the Eighth stood six feet in his socks, and the other two in his
shoes. He was every inch a king, and a great ruler."
--
Jim Easterbrook
BBC Research & Development <http://www.bbc.co.uk/rd/>
*** All opinions are mine and might not be shared by the BBC ***

Mike Ellwood

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May 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/5/98
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One of my favourite memories was of a "Bonny and Clyde"
parody ("Bunny and Clawd") - brilliant, especially the
music.


One of the ISIRTA things, like the Goons, was the running gags,
e.g. "spot" ... "...that spot on the wall..." "woof woof"...
"get down Spot!"...etc.

Interesting that although this was the new wave, alternative
comedy of its day, they could still get away with such un-PC
and arguably racist humour such as "howdedoodere honey"
whenever someone mentioned the word "black", or similar.


For some reason, although I loved ISIRTA, including Cleese,
I never really enjoyed Python (and still don't).

--
Mike.E...@rl.ac.uk

Jon Rouse

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May 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/5/98
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Don Amott wrote:
>
>
> "Hans' neice, Anne Bumpsidaisy"
>
> Bill Oddie's fault, that one.

Mr and Mrs Wallcarpeting and their son, Walter.

Or was that ISIHAC?


--
The views expressed are my own and may not represent those of my employer

Ray Proven

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May 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/5/98
to

In article <354F28...@it.postoffice.co.uk>, Jon Rouse
<rou...@it.postoffice.co.uk> writes

>Don Amott wrote:
>>
>>
>> "Hans' neice, Anne Bumpsidaisy"
>>
>> Bill Oddie's fault, that one.
>
>Mr and Mrs Wallcarpeting and their son, Walter.
>
>Or was that ISIHAC?
>
>
Yes it was.
--
Ray Proven

"Water, taken in moderation, never harmed anyone."
Mark Twain

Steve Crook

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May 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/6/98
to

Graham Higgins wrote:

> Odd to think it was 'new wave' comedy at the time('irreverent
> satire' became Radio Times' catch all for 'what's this?') in contrast to
> Round The Horne, Al Read, or The Clitheroe Kid.

I'll agree with the last two being 'ordinary' (ie a bit dull) but Round The
Horne
was pretty subversive (for the time).

BTW was it ISIRTA or Round The Horne that had the mock-Coward play
where they were just going

"Dwarling"
"Yes, Dwarling"
"Nothing Dwarling, just Dwarling, Dwarling"

Steve

Mike Ellwood

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May 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/6/98
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Steve Crook (st...@brainstorm.co.uk) wrote:
: Graham Higgins wrote:


Round the Horne. Hugh Paddick and Betty Marsden (I think).

"I know"
"I know you know"
"I know you know I know"
"Yes,...I know"

(you had to be there...)


--
Mike.E...@rl.ac.uk

Steve Crook

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May 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/6/98
to

Mike Ellwood wrote:


I was Mike i was (and still am sometimes) - thanks

Steve

Mayes

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May 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/6/98
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Mike Ellwood wrote in message <6imjh1$j...@newton.cc.rl.ac.uk>...
:
:One of the ISIRTA things, like the Goons, was the running gags,


:e.g. "spot" ... "...that spot on the wall..." "woof woof"...
: "get down Spot!"...etc.

:
"Daddy, Daddy, what are those for?"

"FOUR??"

--
Penny Mayes
"Chantries" Bredgar, Kent
e-mail: pe...@bredgar.globalSnet.co.uk
doff cap when replying

Richard Lambley

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May 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/6/98
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In message <CNEnrVAH...@mines-a-pint.demon.co.uk>
Ray Proven <r...@mines-a-pint.demon.co.uk> wrote:

> In article <354F28...@it.postoffice.co.uk>, Jon Rouse
> <rou...@it.postoffice.co.uk> writes
> >

> >Mr and Mrs Wallcarpeting and their son, Walter.
> >
> >Or was that ISIHAC?
> >
> >
> Yes it was.

But it was on ISIRTA long before -- spoken by David Hatch, I fancy.
Although it was traditionally John "Otto" Cleese who announced all
them late arrivals wot 'ad funny names....

Richard


Guy Barry

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May 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/6/98
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In article <01bd7560$4853bec0$ce3163c3@default>,

Brian Taylor <Bta...@btinternet.com> wrote:
>I'd like to hear from other fans of good old Radio Prune. No-one I know
>has even heard of this 60s/70s radio comedy programme.

Wasn't it a Radio 2 show rather than Radio 4? It often
gets repeated on R2, especially at holiday times. I
certainly enjoy it a lot.

Guy Barry

--

b.h.j...@hw.ac.uk

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May 7, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/7/98
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On 1998-05-06 st...@brainstorm.co.uk said:
Newsgroups: uk.media.radio.bbc-r4
Graham Higgins wrote:

Odd to think it was 'new wave' comedy at the
time('irreverent satire' became Radio Times' catch all for
'what's this?') in contrast to Round The Horne, Al Read, or The
Clitheroe Kid.

I'll agree with the last two being 'ordinary' (ie a bit dull) but
Round The Horne
was pretty subversive (for the time).
BTW was it ISIRTA or Round The Horne that had the mock-Coward play
where they were just going
"Dwarling"
"Yes, Dwarling"
"Nothing Dwarling, just Dwarling, Dwarling"

Steve

I _think_ that originated in PUNCH more than 100 years ago. The
"Mock-Coward" from "Round The Horne", IMHO, went

Cynthia Darling...

Yes, Darling?

I ...know, Darling

I know you know, Darling...

I know you know I know, Darling....

which was much more of an achievement for the typist, before they got
word processors.

============ ===== ===== BILL J. ===== ===== ============
GM8APX, qthr Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

Sic vos non vobis mellificatis, apes

Net-Tamer V 1.11 - Registered

Graham Higgins

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May 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/8/98
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<b.h.j...@hw.ac.uk> wrote:
> The
> "Mock-Coward" from "Round The Horne", IMHO, went
>
> Cynthia Darling...
>
> Yes, Darling?
>
> I ...know, Darling
>
> I know you know, Darling...
>
> I know you know I know, Darling....
>
> which was much more of an achievement for the typist, before they got
> word processors.
>
.. and adverbs piled on endlessly,longingly, yearningly,
theatrically breathily by... Was it Hugh Paddick as 'aging juvenile
Binky Huckaback' and Betty Marsden as... who? Was that Dame Celia
Molestrangler?
I agree that the Kenneth Horne shows were just about perfect and
deeply subversive, and I meant in my earlier post that the ISIRTA team
were the posh young pretenders.

Steve Crook

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May 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/8/98
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Guy Barry wrote:

> Wasn't it a Radio 2 show rather than Radio 4? It often
> gets repeated on R2, especially at holiday times. I
> certainly enjoy it a lot.
>
> Guy Barry
>

It was *originally* on radio 4 (or was it the Home Service still back then ?)

It has been repeated a few times on Radio 2 though.

Steve

b.h.j...@hw.ac.uk

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May 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/8/98
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Is Dame Celia Molestrangler related to Lady Constance de Coverlet ("But
you can call me Bedspread!")?

============ ===== ===== BILL J. ===== ===== ============
GM8APX, qthr Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

Nil illegitimi carborundum

Mike Ellwood

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May 11, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/11/98
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Graham Higgins (g...@pokkettz.demon.co.ukxx) wrote:

: I agree that the Kenneth Horne shows were just about perfect and


: deeply subversive, and I meant in my earlier post that the ISIRTA team
: were the posh young pretenders.


"Round the Horne" was a subversive show but still more or less
conforming to the tradition of radio shows of the time
when it started. ISIRTA was in a "modern" format, and fairly ground-breaking
for its time.


I can just about remember the predecessor to "Round the Horne",
which was called "Beyond our Ken", which was presumably a bit
less risque', but I was too young and naive to get the risque
jokes then, anyway. RTH was the same show updated for the
sixties culture, I would say.
--
Mike.E...@rl.ac.uk

Richard Lambley

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May 12, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/12/98
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In message <6j6chq$11...@newton.cc.rl.ac.uk>
m...@unixfe.cc.rl.ac.uk (Mike Ellwood) wrote:

> "Round the Horne" was a subversive show but still more or less
> conforming to the tradition of radio shows of the time when it
> started. ISIRTA was in a "modern" format, and fairly ground-breaking
> for its time.

Among their ground-breaking features were the memorable comic song
spots by Bill Oddie B.A. (in previous shows, the musical interludes
were by the band or guest singers/performers rather than by the cast
themselves). I once found an LP of some of these songs in a
second-hand shop in Walton on Thames; it was fun, but the studio
recordings didn't quite capture the sparkle of those live performances
with the studio audience.

Richard
--


b.h.j...@hw.ac.uk

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May 12, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/12/98
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On 1998-05-12 Ric...@wireless.demon.co.uk said:
Newsgroups: uk.media.radio.bbc-r4

One I'd like to hear again was "Bounce, bounce, bounce..." (in an Indian
accent)..
"Happy are we,
At the BBC -
What does it stand for?
British Bouncing Corporation -

Bounce, bounce, bounce, Whee!
(On-a-bed-of-nails)...

Anyone able to help?

Thanks, nurse.

============ ===== ===== BILL J. ===== ===== ============ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ1234567890:\.><?*()&*^%$#@!=+_-`~',;{}[] GM8APX, qthr Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

Splendide mendax

Mike Ellwood

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May 13, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/13/98
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b.h.j...@hw.ac.uk wrote:


: One I'd like to hear again was "Bounce, bounce, bounce..." (in an Indian


: accent)..
: "Happy are we,
: At the BBC -
: What does it stand for?
: British Bouncing Corporation -


And a satire they did on (yet another) revamp at the BBC
(nothing changes, does it?), with Radio1/2 style jingles
for R4:

(mournful voice, minor key):
"Ha Ha Ha, Hee Hee Hee,
I heard it on the Bee Bee Cee"

etc.

:)
--
Mike.E...@rl.ac.uk

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