jack's mind

7 views
Skip to first unread message

torquil fronde

unread,
May 20, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/20/98
to
I used to know a schizophrenic who sounded exactly like Jack. Jack's mental processes remind me of him as well. I wonder if they could be related?

Robin Fairbairns

unread,
May 20, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/20/98
to

In article <35631FF6...@globalnet.co.uk>,
torquil fronde <rhil...@globalnet.co.uk> wrote:
>[in plain text, and then for exciting added value, in html]

>I used to know a schizophrenic who sounded exactly like Jack. Jack's
>mental processes remind me of him as well. I wonder if they could be
>related?

i know a lot of people who suffer from schizophrenia. some of them i
know pretty well, and not one of them has ever called jack to my mind.

jack's a bit of a bumbler, maybe, but he doesn't suffer from
schizophrenia (unlike the poor ex-soldier i watched in mrs. dalloway
last night).
--
I live in the crowd of jollity, not so much to enjoy company as to shun
myself. -- Samuel Johnson

hen...@tibco.com

unread,
May 21, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/21/98
to

In article <35631FF6...@globalnet.co.uk>,
torquil fronde <rhil...@globalnet.co.uk> wrote:
>
>
> --------------247DD8EF0D7BBAADB254F95A
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

>
> I used to know a schizophrenic who sounded exactly like Jack. Jack's
> mental processes remind me of him as well. I wonder if they could be
> related?
>
> --------------247DD8EF0D7BBAADB254F95A
> Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
> <HTML>
> I used to know a schizophrenic who sounded <I>exactly</I> like Jack. Jack's

> mental processes remind me of him as well. I wonder if they could be
related?</HTML>
>
> --------------247DD8EF0D7BBAADB254F95A--

It's nice that the text of this message got duplicated. Almost as if it were
written by two different personalities...


-----== Posted via Deja News, The Leader in Internet Discussion ==-----
http://www.dejanews.com/ Now offering spam-free web-based newsreading

Niles

unread,
May 22, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/22/98
to

hen...@tibco.com wrote:

~
~It's nice that the text of this message got duplicated. Almost as if it
were
~written by two different personalities...

Well, and we all know that 4 out of 3 schizophrenics work for the BBC. You
must have heard them in the canteen: I'll have what I'm having.

I used to schizophrenic myself, but they cured me. Where am I now when I
need me?

Seriously, my doctor once told me that I was psychic, paranoid *and*
schizophrenic. Well, he didn't actually come out and say it, but we all knew
he was thinking it.

--
Niles * Archers' Family Tree at:- *
"The man ain't got no kulcha" www.users.zetnet.co.uk/alexf/

Glynn & Kathy Greenwood

unread,
May 22, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/22/98
to

In article <3568a7f9...@news.zetnet.co.uk>,
Niles <alex....@zetnet.co.uk> wrote:

<very unfunny stuff snipped>

A good friend of mine suffers from schizophrenia. It is not funny.

--
Glynn Greenwood - Proud to be English.


Simon Townley

unread,
May 24, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/24/98
to

In article <484a612...@argonet.co.uk>, Glynn & Kathy Greenwood
<gw...@argonet.co.uk> wrote:

> In article <3568a7f9...@news.zetnet.co.uk>,
> Niles <alex....@zetnet.co.uk> wrote:
>
> <very unfunny stuff snipped>
>
> A good friend of mine suffers from schizophrenia. It is not funny.

Schizophrenia is not funny. And no-one wishes to upset or offend you or
your friend. But Niles' post made me laugh. AIDS is not funny, Alzheimer's
is not funny. Being Jewish/Irish/Polish (etc.) is not funny. There is
nothing amusing about the perceived differences between the sexes, or
about persons of different sexual orientation from our own. There was
nothing particularly funny about the death of DiPow, or the arrest of Mr
Michael (what's white and slides down a tile? George Michael's latest
release), at least not for Mr Michael. But all these have given rise to
excellent jokes that make us laugh, despite the fact that we feel
'naughty', and in some ways guilty for laughing at them.

Sometimes the 'victims' of jokes have the best jokes about their own
situation. Think of the number of Jewish comedians who have specialised in
sending themselves up. My Grandmother had a wonderful Alzheimer's joke. It
was just a pity she could never remember the punchline.

--
Simon Townley

chris harrison

unread,
May 24, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/24/98
to

Glynn & Kathy Greenwood wrote:
>
> In article <3568a7f9...@news.zetnet.co.uk>,
> Niles <alex....@zetnet.co.uk> wrote:
>
> <very unfunny stuff snipped>
>
> A good friend of mine suffers from schizophrenia. It is not funny.

A good friend of mine suffers from being American. It isn't particularly
funny, but we laugh about that all the time.

You can find humour in something through making jokes without
necessarily being offensive to someone.

Niles

unread,
May 25, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/25/98
to

Glynn & Kathy Greenwood <gw...@argonet.co.uk> wrote:

~
~A good friend of mine suffers from schizophrenia. It is not funny.

IMO the schizophrenia jokes are more on the misconception of what the illness
entails than the condition itself. YMMV. Prefer me to tell queer jokes?

Robin Fairbairns

unread,
May 25, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/25/98
to

In article <356ea3a6...@news.zetnet.co.uk>,

Niles <alex....@zetnet.co.uk> wrote:
>Glynn & Kathy Greenwood <gw...@argonet.co.uk> wrote:
>~A good friend of mine suffers from schizophrenia. It is not funny.
>
>IMO the schizophrenia jokes are more on the misconception of what the illness
>entails than the condition itself. YMMV. Prefer me to tell queer jokes?

i'm pleased that glynn complained. not long back, you and i had an
exchange about queer-bashing in umra and you remarked that slapping
homophobes down is always done better by straight (i've never
understood that label) people.

i felt positively ill when i read your `jokes'. i do not myself
suffer from schizophrenia, but someone very near and dear to me does.

as you would have known if you had read my post at the beginning of
this thread, following up the fatuous suggestion that jack is
suffering from schizophrenia.

Robert Carnegie

unread,
May 28, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/28/98
to

In article <6kcn46$49v$1...@lyra.csx.cam.ac.uk>, Robin Fairbairns
<r...@cl.cam.ac.uk> writes

>In article <356ea3a6...@news.zetnet.co.uk>,
>Niles <alex....@zetnet.co.uk> wrote:
>>Glynn & Kathy Greenwood <gw...@argonet.co.uk> wrote:
>>~A good friend of mine suffers from schizophrenia. It is not funny.
>>
>>IMO the schizophrenia jokes are more on the misconception of what the
>illness
>>entails than the condition itself.

Both correct, although the singular posting from 'Glynn & Kathy'
raised a smile here.

This layman understands schizophrenia (arguably a label
misapplied to various different mental experiences) to be in fact
perceived by the sufferer as, usually, voices constantly making
unhelpful or even harmful comments and suggestions - a cross
between tinnitus and Jimmy Hill on Match of the Day.

Schizophrenia isn't where you think you're lots of different people:
that's Dissociative Identity Disorder (formerly called Multiple
Personality Disorder). Coincidentally, I've just been reading
Elayne Wechsler-Chaput's review of the adult comicbook one DID
sufferer, Madison Clell, is writing and self-publishing about her
own experiences - I suppose she's the writer, penciler, inker,
colourist...

As we seldom hear about DID outside bad films, novels and
jokes, where it's usually called 'schizophrenia', I presume that it's
quite rare.

> fatuous suggestion that jack is
>suffering from schizophrenia.

Well, there must be _some_ reason why Jack has no sense of
what a blithering idiot he often is. 'Torquil' (really?) claimed to
have been acquainted with a sufferer whom Jack reminded him of
- he said he 'sounded' like Jack - perhaps he would like to say
more about it.

The tabloid press at least recognises that schizophrenia is not the
multiple personality disorder I already mentioned - we are usually
told that a sufferer has 'heard voices' telling them to do something
disastrous. I admit I am out of my depth and I risk giving offence,
but Jack's problem as I see it is that he is told things offhand by
people he plays golf with or meets on business, and similarly
rushes off to act on them.

Of course, our friends in TA are at risk of sudden personality
changes with every new SW...

Re Jack's latest bee in the bonnet - recruitment practice - which
Caroline seems to have managed to avoid involvement in, good
for her, I would have liked to hear Susan tell him, "It's only a part-
time village shop job, and no one else wants it - how about it?"
Likewise, she should have told Brian, "I meant what I said before,
it's a rotten job and you're a lousy manager, but I need the money,
and as for leaving you in the lurch I gave you all the notice required
by law, which is exactly what you would have given me if the post
became redundant." I don't think she'd have been any worse off in
either case.

I suppose that the last time Susan worked in the shop was some
while before her brother Clive's joint armed raid on it - could Jack
perhaps be thinking of that traumatic event, maybe just
subconsciously (not schizophrenically, by the way)?

Worst case scenario - the unnamed woman from Darrington, who
as I understood it does have some kind of personal problem that
Janet was helping her with, quits as Brian's business units
cleaner and is hired by Jack for the shop job. Susan has to go
back to Brian _again_...

Robert Carnegie at home, rja.ca...@mailexcite.com at large
--
"Open all day during the Festive Season" - restaurant leaflet I received in
April

Robin Fairbairns

unread,
May 28, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/28/98
to

In article <93NERoAM...@redjac.demon.co.uk>,

Robert Carnegie <rja.ca...@mailexcite.com> wrote:
>This layman understands schizophrenia (arguably a label
>misapplied to various different mental experiences) to be in fact
>perceived by the sufferer as, usually, voices constantly making
>unhelpful or even harmful comments and suggestions - a cross
>between tinnitus and Jimmy Hill on Match of the Day.

voices are *one* symptom that troubles people who are diagnosed as
suffering from schizophrenia. very commonly, sufferers are observed
conducting heated conversations (apparently) with themselves.

there is a large catalogue of other psychotic effects, including
paranoia (which is a bugger to deal with), dementia and various
delusional states.

>Schizophrenia isn't where you think you're lots of different people:
>that's Dissociative Identity Disorder (formerly called Multiple
>Personality Disorder). Coincidentally, I've just been reading
>Elayne Wechsler-Chaput's review of the adult comicbook one DID
>sufferer, Madison Clell, is writing and self-publishing about her
>own experiences

(could you mail me a reference off-line, or something?)

>Well, there must be _some_ reason why Jack has no sense of
>what a blithering idiot he often is. 'Torquil' (really?) claimed to
>have been acquainted with a sufferer whom Jack reminded him of
>- he said he 'sounded' like Jack - perhaps he would like to say
>more about it.

jack is getting on. my grandmother used to behave somewhat like jack,
responding with verve to the latest fad (for example, being thoroughly
inconsistent about her own great-grandchildren). she wasn't mentally
ill, but i'll bet she would have been diagnosed as suffering from
dementia if she'd lived another few years (she was 7 months short of a
telegram from the queen when she died). i think jack is showing signs
of incipient dementia. dementia alone is *not* enough to diagnose

Chris McMillan

unread,
May 28, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/28/98
to

In article <93NERoAM...@redjac.demon.co.uk>, Robert Carnegie
<URL:mailto:rja.ca...@mailexcite.com> wrote:
> In article <6kcn46$49v$1...@lyra.csx.cam.ac.uk>, Robin Fairbairns
> <r...@cl.cam.ac.uk> writes

> Re Jack's latest bee in the bonnet - recruitment practice - which
> Caroline seems to have managed to avoid involvement in, good
> for her,

Didn't Jeck say to Beddy that Caroline was to be involved as well? Funny we
didn't hear of/about her?

Sincerely, Chris

--
Mrs. Chris McMillan. Tel. 0118 926 5450. e-mail:
ch...@mikesounds.demon.co.uk http://www.mikesounds.demon.co.uk/Family.htm


Robert Carnegie

unread,
May 30, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/30/98
to

In article <ant28222...@mikesounds.demon.co.uk>,
Chris McMillan <Ch...@mikesounds.demon.co.uk> writes

>In article <93NERoAM...@redjac.demon.co.uk>, Robert
>Carnegie
><URL:mailto:rja.ca...@mailexcite.com> wrote:
>
>> Re Jack's latest bee in the bonnet - recruitment practice - which
>> Caroline seems to have managed to avoid involvement in, good
>> for her,
>
>Didn't Jeck say to Beddy that Caroline was to be involved as well? Funny
>we
>didn't hear of/about her?

Susan and Betty had both been told that Caroline might be in on it,
from what they said at Neil's birthday do. Reading between the
lines, I presume that Caroline had enough sense to extricate
herself from an absurd interview which was, after all, nothing to do
with her job of running Jack's hotel.

Dozy

unread,
May 31, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/31/98
to

Robert Carnegie (rja.ca...@mailexcite.com) wrote:

: Schizophrenia isn't where you think you're lots of different people:


: that's Dissociative Identity Disorder (formerly called Multiple
: Personality Disorder).

: As we seldom hear about DID outside bad films, novels and


: jokes, where it's usually called 'schizophrenia', I presume that it's
: quite rare.

I'm not sure it is all that rare. I believe it is very common among those
who have suffered childhood sexual abuse, the number of whom is said to be
much greater than is generally thought. If I've got the right idea, it can
happen when the mind blocks off something that has happened, so there is a
part of the mind that doesn't continue to grow from whatever age the
person was when the event happened.

Rosie
--
I have never minded the walls of denominationalism, but I have always
objected to broken glass on top of the walls.
(Nick Mercer)

K Richard W

unread,
May 31, 1998, 3:00:00 AM5/31/98
to

In article <$8nYHPAI...@redjac.demon.co.uk>, Robert Carnegie
<rja.ca...@mailexcite.com> writes

>Susan and Betty had both been told that Caroline might be in on it,
>from what they said at Neil's birthday do. Reading between the
>lines, I presume that Caroline had enough sense to extricate
>herself from an absurd interview which was, after all, nothing to do
>with her job of running Jack's hotel.
>

Is it just me or has Caroline been remarkably quiet recently?

As St S's best friend I would have thougt Caroline would be volunteering
for the odd session with Danul (and StS could have had a night out with
Alastair (sp?). One of the few Shula could trust I would have thought.
--
K Richard W

George Middleton

unread,
Jun 1, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/1/98
to

Robert Carnegie wrote:
>As we seldom hear about DID outside bad films, novels and
>jokes, where it's usually called 'schizophrenia', I presume that it's
>quite rare.

Ira Levin's book and Roman Polanski's film, "Rosemary's Baby" treat
paranoid schizophenia in a fully adult way. So adult in fact that nobody
understood and eventually the author and the director both gave up and
allowed the book/film to be described as being about devil worship in
New York.

The story is of course told entirely from Rosemary's perspective and
shows how terrifyingly real the delusions of schizophenia appear to the
sufferer.
--
George

Alan Craig

unread,
Jun 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/2/98
to

K Richard W wrote:
>

>
> Is it just me or has Caroline been remarkably quiet recently?
>

I was in a check-in queue at Newcastle airport about ten
days ago and the person in the next queue over (going to
the Channel islands, I think) had her suitcase labelled
`C.Bone'

Brenda Selwyn

unread,
Jun 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/2/98
to

>K Richard W <richard....@studyroom.demon.co.uk> wrote:

>Is it just me or has Caroline been remarkably quiet recently?

Your wish is the SWs command apparently.

(See next weeks Dramatis Personae when George posts it).

BTW, I recently spotted Mrs Pemerberton's alter ego Sara Coward
moonlighting in the BBC1 children's drama serial "The Demon
Headmaster".

Brenda
--
***************************************************************
Brenda M Selwyn
Rose Cottage, The Hook, Timsbury, Bath, Somerset BA3 1NE
bre...@matson.demon.co.uk
http://www.matson.demon.co.uk/brenda.htm

Robin Fairbairns

unread,
Jun 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/2/98
to

In article <3GVNGGA4...@studyroom.demon.co.uk>,

K Richard W <richard....@studyroom.demon.co.uk> wrote:
>Is it just me or has Caroline been remarkably quiet recently?

you, of course, have an excuse: caroline has been quiet, with no
excuse whatever.

>As St S's best friend I would have thougt Caroline would be volunteering
>for the odd session with Danul (and StS could have had a night out with
>Alastair (sp?). One of the few Shula could trust I would have thought.

one gets the distinct impression that sts is fed up with the mere idea
of alistair, and that his attentions are contributing to her increasing
neuroses about danul.

combine this with the increasingly silly thread about the pointless
world cup tickets (what idiot would believe that the grundys were
privy to corporate hospitality tickets? what idiot would not guess
what tickets they were?), and we have a scenario where alistair pays
ridiculously over the odds for tickets he doesn't want, gets told by
sts that he's got to be joking if he expects her to come to france
with him and soon after disappears from our fotwd after a parting
gesture of redonating the tickets to the grundy boys.

makes one sick...

Andrew Stevenson

unread,
Jun 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/2/98
to

Brenda Selwyn wrote in message


>>K Richard W wrote:
>
>>Is it just me or has Caroline been remarkably quiet recently?
>

>Your wish is the SWs command apparently.
>
>(See next weeks Dramatis Personae when George posts it).

Good heavens!

Whatever next?!!

Spoilers for the Dramatis Personae now!


:-)

--
Andrew

George Middleton

unread,
Jun 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/2/98
to

Andrew Stevenson wrote:
>Spoilers for the Dramatis Personae now!

Well, it made me dash out into the rain and buy the Radio Times. I had
completely forgotten my duties.
--
George

Andrew John Roberts

unread,
Jun 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/2/98
to

The message <6l0ief$r6d$1...@lyra.csx.cam.ac.uk>
from r...@cl.cam.ac.uk (Robin Fairbairns) contains these words:


> one gets the distinct impression that sts is fed up with the mere idea
> of alistair, and that his attentions are contributing to her increasing
> neuroses about danul.

Yep, but she's thrilled to bits with the doctor.

>
> combine this with the increasingly silly thread about the pointless
> world cup tickets (what idiot would believe that the grundys were

Well yes, but the idea of Joe handing over the sealed envelope and
then scarpering made me laugh, I mean if you do that to your vet and
your doctor ( and your grandsons ) in a small village?

> privy to corporate hospitality tickets? what idiot would not guess
> what tickets they were?), and we have a scenario where alistair pays
> ridiculously over the odds for tickets he doesn't want, gets told by
> sts that he's got to be joking if he expects her to come to france
> with him and soon after disappears from our fotwd after a parting

Good riddance.

> gesture of redonating the tickets to the grundy boys.
> makes one sick...

On the other hand we *did* complain that there wasn't
enough comedy ...........
--
Andy R


Andrew John Roberts

unread,
Jun 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/2/98
to

The message <3GVNGGA4...@studyroom.demon.co.uk>
from K Richard W <richard....@studyroom.demon.co.uk>
contains these words:

> As St S's best friend I would have thougt Caroline would be volunteering
> for the odd session with Danul (and StS could have had a night out with
> Alastair (sp?). One of the few Shula could trust I would have thought.

Trustworthy maybe, but totally inexperienced with children. Shula does have
a brother though, so she could easily leave Daniel with ((David OR
Ruth) AND pip)
--
Andy R


Steve Holden

unread,
Jun 2, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/2/98
to

Brenda Selwyn wrote in message <3573c524....@news.demon.co.uk>...


>>K Richard W <richard....@studyroom.demon.co.uk> wrote:
>
>>Is it just me or has Caroline been remarkably quiet recently?
>
>Your wish is the SWs command apparently.
>
>(See next weeks Dramatis Personae when George posts it).


The missus has cited Caroline as the obvious candidate for playing Lady
Chatterley/ hide the knackwurst with gamekeeper Greg...and on reflection she
may be right,remembering the episode longlong ago with the SAS man,who had
her creeping through the nocturnal undergrowth on many occasions IIRC.

Steve lewd


Charles Norrie

unread,
Jun 3, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/3/98
to

>
>I was in a check-in queue at Newcastle airport about ten
>days ago and the person in the next queue over (going to
>the Channel islands, I think) had her suitcase labelled
>`C.Bone'

Visiting Lillian no doubt. If so, why?
--
Charles Norrie (When replying please remove the double meat filling)

Brenda Selwyn

unread,
Jun 3, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/3/98
to

>r...@cl.cam.ac.uk (Robin Fairbairns) wrote:

>one gets the distinct impression that sts is fed up with the mere idea
>of alistair, and that his attentions are contributing to her increasing
>neuroses about danul.

>snip>


>and soon after disappears from our fotwd after a parting

>gesture of redonating the tickets to the grundy boys.

I agree The Saint and the Vet are probably about to split up, but that
doesn't mean that he's about to be written out. For a start, it could
just be a hiccup in their relationship - it was before my time but,
prior to their marriage, didn't her on-off relationship with Mark go
on for years? OTOH, Alistair could give StS up as a bad job and
settle down with his second choice, Caroline.

Brenda Selwyn

unread,
Jun 3, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/3/98
to

>r...@cl.cam.ac.uk (Robin Fairbairns) wrote:

>one gets the distinct impression that sts is fed up with the mere idea
>of alistair, and that his attentions are contributing to her increasing
>neuroses about danul.

Does anyone else think that Shula's attitude towards Daniel's illness
is unhealthy? I'm writing rather tentatively as there are others here
much more qualified to comment on this than I am, but ISTM that if one
has a child with a chronic illness, one cannot afford to allow that
illness to completely dominate one's life. At the moment Shula seems
able to think of nothing else, which seems to me like a recipe for a
nervous breakdown.

Robin Fairbairns

unread,
Jun 3, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/3/98
to

In article <3576f428...@news.demon.co.uk>,

Brenda Selwyn <bre...@matson.demon.co.uk> wrote:
>>r...@cl.cam.ac.uk (Robin Fairbairns) wrote:
>>one gets the distinct impression that sts is fed up with the mere idea
>>of alistair, and that his attentions are contributing to her increasing
>>neuroses about danul.
>
>I agree The Saint and the Vet are probably about to split up, but that
>doesn't mean that he's about to be written out. For a start, it could
>just be a hiccup in their relationship - it was before my time but,
>prior to their marriage, didn't her on-off relationship with Mark go
>on for years? OTOH, Alistair could give StS up as a bad job and
>settle down with his second choice, Caroline.

when shula stood mark up first time, he disappeared (while regularly
featuring in reported speech), eventually getting a job in hong kong
(nod, nod, wink, wink). i wouldn't be surprised if the wonder-horse
vet disappeared for a fair while even if the beetle's long-term plan
is to have them cuddled up together.

Linda

unread,
Jun 3, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/3/98
to

In a moment of abandoned spontaneity, Linda was inspired - but this
isn't that moment:

>Does anyone else think that Shula's attitude towards Daniel's illness
>is unhealthy?

Yes.

>I'm writing rather tentatively

Shame on you :-)

> as there are others here
>much more qualified to comment on this than I am, but ISTM that if one
>has a child with a chronic illness, one cannot afford to allow that
>illness to completely dominate one's life.

But if you're a Saint?

> At the moment Shula seems
>able to think of nothing else, which seems to me like a recipe for a
>nervous breakdown.

Not *more* fun shurely

--
Linda

Charles F Hankel

unread,
Jun 4, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/4/98
to

Brenda Selwyn wrote:
>
> >r...@cl.cam.ac.uk (Robin Fairbairns) wrote:
>
> >one gets the distinct impression that sts is fed up with the mere idea
> >of alistair, and that his attentions are contributing to her increasing
> >neuroses about danul.
>
> Does anyone else think that Shula's attitude towards Daniel's illness
> is unhealthy? I'm writing rather tentatively as there are others here

> much more qualified to comment on this than I am, but ISTM that if one
> has a child with a chronic illness, one cannot afford to allow that
> illness to completely dominate one's life. At the moment Shula seems

> able to think of nothing else, which seems to me like a recipe for a
> nervous breakdown.

Or a boy with problems ahead. A good friend of mine came over to the UK
some years ago with her then young son. She wouldn't let him do
anything remotely hazardous, not even footie or rugger as he grew
older. She's always trying to protect him so that he doesn't get hurt
and he has led a pretty closeted life with his social skills being less
than well developed. He's a nice lad, and despite being six foot eight
is a good-looking lad as well. And she's still "protecting" him.

He puts up with it all but I'm sure that the situation will blow up when
he finally gets a girl (he's off to university this year but as they now
live in a small country, it isn't be far from from home), or a girl gets
him. I'm dreading what will happen between them. I have mentioned this
matter of being over-protective to her but she doesn't seem to think
that she is, and can rationally explain everything.

The problem behind it all is that his father was pretty violent to them
both, and that's why she pitched up at my place one day with the toddler
all those years ago.

--
Charles F Hankel
-------------------------------------
Hapless FAQer on the Wirral peninsula

http://www.mersinet.co.uk/~hankel/uf/umrafaq.html

Robert Carnegie

unread,
Jun 4, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/4/98
to

In article <CT468CCo...@geodeonssppaamm.demon.co.
uk>, Charles Norrie <Cha...@geodeon.demon.co.uk> writes

>>
>>I was in a check-in queue at Newcastle airport about ten
>>days ago and the person in the next queue over (going to
>>the Channel islands, I think) had her suitcase labelled
>>`C.Bone'
>
>Visiting Lillian no doubt. If so, why?

Is Duty Free a factor?

But I would have supposed that Guy 'Moneybags' Pemberton
would have ensured that all Cazza's luggage was monogrammed
'C Pemberton (Mrs)' for the honeymoon.

What a courtship that was. I wonder whether umrats compared
and contrasted Robin and Guy at the time -

"Your girlfriend's horse is stolen. Do you:
a) Offer a shoulder to cry on
b) Let your sons from your first marriage go looking for it
c) Buy her another one?"

Robert Carnegie

unread,
Jun 4, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/4/98
to

In article <199806021...@zetnet.co.uk>, Andrew John
Roberts <andy...@zetnet.co.uk> writes

>> combine this with the increasingly silly thread about the pointless
>> world cup tickets (what idiot would believe that the grundys were

You want jam on it, you do.

>Well yes, but the idea of Joe handing over the sealed envelope and
>then scarpering made me laugh, I mean if you do that to your vet and
>your doctor ( and your grandsons ) in a small village?

I predict a series of mysterious and suspiciously expert cattle
mutilations.

>> a parting gesture of redonating the tickets to the grundy boys.

Probably, yes. "Great, now we _can_ go to Japan v Jamaica after
all!"

But surely Clarrie would make Joe give the money back.

I'd prefer to see - well, hear - Clarrie cotton on just in time and
snatch the envelope from Joe's hand just before Alistair
grudgingly pays up - it would just serve the miserable old git right.
And I like Alistair.

Dozy

unread,
Jun 4, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/4/98
to

Robert Carnegie (rja.ca...@mailexcite.com) wrote:
: I'd prefer to see - well, hear - Clarrie cotton on just in time and

: snatch the envelope from Joe's hand just before Alistair
: grudgingly pays up - it would just serve the miserable old git right.
: And I like Alistair.

It's highly unlikely, but I would like to hear Clarrie receive a letter
from France, something along the lines of: "So sorry we sent you the wrong
tickets before. Here are the ones for the England-whoever game...."

Robin Fairbairns

unread,
Jun 4, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/4/98
to

In article <6l6h07$2uc$1...@sirius.dur.ac.uk>,

Dozy <R.A.Bu...@durham.ac.uk> wrote:
>Robert Carnegie (rja.ca...@mailexcite.com) wrote:
>: I'd prefer to see - well, hear - Clarrie cotton on just in time and
>: snatch the envelope from Joe's hand just before Alistair
>: grudgingly pays up - it would just serve the miserable old git right.
>: And I like Alistair.
>
>It's highly unlikely, but I would like to hear Clarrie receive a letter
>from France, something along the lines of: "So sorry we sent you the wrong
>tickets before. Here are the ones for the England-whoever game...."

rosie, that's brilliant, though hopefully not *too* brilliant for it
to have occurred to the sws.

i shall regard it as an official prediction, and shall strive for you
get kudos for it if you prove to be right.

Chris McMillan

unread,
Jun 4, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/4/98
to

In article <35774cd2...@news.demon.co.uk>, Brenda Selwyn

<URL:mailto:bre...@matson.demon.co.uk> wrote:
> >r...@cl.cam.ac.uk (Robin Fairbairns) wrote:
>
> >one gets the distinct impression that sts is fed up with the mere idea
> >of alistair, and that his attentions are contributing to her increasing
> >neuroses about danul.
>
> Does anyone else think that Shula's attitude towards Daniel's illness
> is unhealthy? I'm writing rather tentatively as there are others here
> much more qualified to comment on this than I am, but ISTM that if one
> has a child with a chronic illness, one cannot afford to allow that
> illness to completely dominate one's life. At the moment Shula seems
> able to think of nothing else, which seems to me like a recipe for a
> nervous breakdown.
>
While its true that one cannot afford to allow the illness to dominate one's
life I think we're seeing St.S has trying to 'cope' as a 'one parent' person
- the arthritis is just the 'handle'. She's one sort of 'one parent', and
we're seeing her as 'sensible'/caring - she has to learn to cope with this
condition in her own way and in her own time and, of course, we don't know
what the outcome with Richard or Alastair will be: we saw Shaz as leaving
Koilie too much on her own (remember Kathy's comments about recognising a
'one parent' child?) and Kate will be another 'one parent' type. three
different ways of showing one parent people.

Niles

unread,
Jun 4, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/4/98
to

Robert Carnegie <rja.ca...@mailexcite.com> wrote:

~
~You want jam on it, you do.

Aaargh! No! Spare us the jam!

--
Niles * Archers' Family Tree at:- *
"The man ain't got no kulcha" www.users.zetnet.co.uk/alexf/

Charles Norrie

unread,
Jun 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/5/98
to

I

>While its true that one cannot afford to allow the illness to dominate one's
>life I think we're seeing St.S has trying to 'cope' as a 'one parent' person

/rant on/

It's always the parent who has to do with the coping with the child.
What about the child who has to cope with one parent.

The answers to this question cannot be entirely balanced, for I think
that most UMRAts have reached the age of majority, if not discretion.

/rant off/

Mike Ellwood

unread,
Jun 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/5/98
to

Robin Fairbairns (r...@cl.cam.ac.uk) wrote:

: i shall regard it as an official prediction, and shall strive for you


: get kudos for it if you prove to be right.

Agreed. I shall commence striving, forthwith.
--
Mike.E...@rl.ac.uk

Charles F Hankel

unread,
Jun 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/5/98
to

Niles wrote:
>
> Robert Carnegie <rja.ca...@mailexcite.com> wrote:
>
> ~
> ~You want jam on it, you do.
>
> Aaargh! No! Spare us the jam!

Quite. He'll be suggesting comfy chairs next...

Mayes

unread,
Jun 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/5/98
to

Charles Norrie wrote in message ...
:I


:>While its true that one cannot afford to allow the illness to dominate
one's
:>life I think we're seeing St.S has trying to 'cope' as a 'one parent'
person
:
:/rant on/
:
:It's always the parent who has to do with the coping with the child.
:What about the child who has to cope with one parent.


I think mine have learnt to cope with me quite well. The older one found
out about 3 years after her father died that a major disadvantage was
having no 'court of appeal' when it came to which school she should go
to. The younger one remembers little about having 2 parents but both
have recognised the advantages of having only one person's prejudices to
cope with. They tend to see their friends parents as being ultra strict.
Maybe I'm just too laid back - can't see the point of saying 'no' and
starting an argument if I can't fully justify it.

Coping with my depression has made them both mature and supportive
beyond their years. Which I suppose is unfair but I feel a family is (or
should be) a mutual support unit, so I've never gone in for hiding my
feelings from the children. Like anyone else, if they don't know how you
feel, they can't help you. Which works both ways of course.

I'll never forget the day when TJ screamed at me 'Where were you until 3
in the morning, I was really worried!' Unfortunately, her memory of how
that feels had faded by the time she started staying out 'til all hours
:o).

Being the only child of a single parent must be different again.

--
the widows mite - and there again they might not
Penny Mayes pe...@bredgar.globalSnet.co.uk
doff cap to reply

Chris McMillan

unread,
Jun 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/5/98
to

In article <6l6hs3$529$1...@lyra.csx.cam.ac.uk>, Robin Fairbairns

<URL:mailto:r...@cl.cam.ac.uk> wrote:
> In article <6l6h07$2uc$1...@sirius.dur.ac.uk>,
> Dozy <R.A.Bu...@durham.ac.uk> wrote:
> >Robert Carnegie (rja.ca...@mailexcite.com) wrote:

>
> i shall regard it as an official prediction, and shall strive for you
> get kudos for it if you prove to be right.
>

I suppose it'll be easier for you to get kudos than BTAs.

Robert Carnegie

unread,
Jun 5, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/5/98
to

In article <F4LLGOBl...@geodeonssppaamm.demon.co.

uk>, Charles Norrie <Cha...@geodeon.demon.co.uk> writes
>I
>>While its true that one cannot afford to allow the illness to dominate
>one's
>>life I think we're seeing St.S has trying to 'cope' as a 'one parent' person
>
>/rant on/
>
>It's always the parent who has to do with the coping with the child.
>What about the child who has to cope with one parent.
>
>The answers to this question cannot be entirely balanced, for I think
>that most UMRAts have reached the age of majority, if not discretion.
>
>/rant off/

I had two ageing Ps, and three sisters much older than me - I
wouldn't be without them, but I think a child can get larkined up in
a large household where everyone else is an adult.

Brenda Selwyn

unread,
Jun 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/6/98
to

>Chris McMillan <Ch...@mikesounds.demon.co.uk> wrote:

>we saw Shaz as leaving
>Koilie too much on her own (remember Kathy's comments about recognising a
>'one parent' child?)

This being completely different from StS taking every opportunity to
leave Daniel in the care of anyone other than herself until about 3
months ago.

Charles F Hankel

unread,
Jun 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/6/98
to

Mayes wrote:
>
<snipped some very touching stuff on widowhood>

>
> I'll never forget the day when TJ screamed at me 'Where were you until 3
> in the morning, I was really worried!' Unfortunately, her memory of how

OK so where were you until 3 in the morning? The BBQ finished much
earlier than that. ITWSBT :-)

Peter Hesketh

unread,
Jun 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/6/98
to

In article <6l0ief$r6d$1...@lyra.csx.cam.ac.uk>, Robin Fairbairns
<r...@cl.cam.ac.uk> writes

>what idiot would believe that the grundys were
>privy to corporate hospitality tickets? what idiot would not guess
>what tickets they were?

Someone who didn't listen to TA, obviously.
--
Regards - - Peter Hesketh p...@phesk.demon.co.uk
"Content of a follow-up post should exceed quoted content; keep
signatures short, 4 lines max." - RFC1855

Robert Carnegie

unread,
Jun 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/6/98
to

In article <6l0ief$r6d$1...@lyra.csx.cam.ac.uk>, Robin Fairbairns
<r...@cl.cam.ac.uk> writes

>what idiot would believe that the grundys were
>privy to corporate hospitality tickets?

Apparently they _are_ corporate hospitality tickets (which are
presumably transferrable to someone else, unlike bog-standard
terrace tickets).

I suppose that by French standards the Grundy children _might_
be considered old enough to drink champagne...?

Chris McMillan

unread,
Jun 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/6/98
to

In article <6l8ol9$m2p$3...@heliodor.xara.net>, Mayes
<URL:mailto:bre...@globalSnet.co.uk> wrote:
>

> Being the only child of a single parent must be different again.
>

It is.

I was the only child of a single parent for about 5 years (mum
died). Unfortunately for me, we didn't see much of each other as I was at
boarding school so the closeness didn't develop. We still don't see eye to
eye 99.9% of the time, and even more unfortunately I don't really enjoy
spending much time with either him or my step mother. Not that I think
that's to do with it being me and him being my dad, but being away at
boarding school for 12 years and not having any brothers and sisters to keep
me in touch with being a family. They decided not to have children as there
would have been 17 years between us, how much thought there was about the
possibility of there being a second child with a disability I don't know,
but my step mum being a Health Visitor I reckon that was a contributing
factor too as she was getting on for 40 I think then.

Dozy

unread,
Jun 6, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/6/98
to

Mike Ellwood (m...@unixfe.cc.rl.ac.uk) wrote:
: Robin Fairbairns (r...@cl.cam.ac.uk) wrote:

: : i shall regard it as an official prediction, and shall strive for you
: : get kudos for it if you prove to be right.

: Agreed. I shall commence striving, forthwith.

<blushes>

Oh Robin, oh Mike - I don't deserve such honour.

</blushes>

Chris J Dixon

unread,
Jun 7, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/7/98
to

Robert Carnegie wrote:

>I had two ageing Ps, and three sisters much older than me - I
>wouldn't be without them, but I think a child can get larkined up in
>a large household where everyone else is an adult.

For a few moments I had a picture of "Darling Buds of May",
before your reference became clear.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/49/21 M B+ G+ A L(-) I S-- P- CH-(--) Ar++ T+ H0
chris...@easynet.co.uk
Have dancing shoes, will ceilidh.

Mayes

unread,
Jun 7, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/7/98
to

Chris McMillan wrote in message ...
:In article <6l8ol9$m2p$3...@heliodor.xara.net>, Mayes


:<URL:mailto:bre...@globalSnet.co.uk> wrote:
:>
:
:> Being the only child of a single parent must be different again.
:>
:It is.
:
:I was the only child of a single parent for about 5 years (mum
:died). Unfortunately for me, we didn't see much of each other as I was
at
:boarding school so the closeness didn't develop. We still don't see eye
to
:eye 99.9% of the time, and even more unfortunately I don't really enjoy
:spending much time with either him or my step mother. Not that I think
:that's to do with it being me and him being my dad, but being away at
:boarding school for 12 years

So glad I didn't take my father's advice and send mine away to school.

But whether they are at home or away, the potential complications of the
childrens' feelings about a new partner can put you off the idea. Though
not, I would have thought, in Shula's case, with Dannul being so young.

I was 20 and no longer living at home when my mother died. My
relationship with my father at that time definitely improved - teaching
him to cook brought us together. He remarried 9 years later and his wife
managed to alienate myself and 2 of my 3 brothers remarkably rapidly.
The other brother lives in Tasmania so has little contact.

Getting back to St S, as she obviously now feels uncomfortable in
Alistair's company I think it's definitely time she told him so (though
why he's not given up yet anyway I don't know). If she just wants him as
a friend she should say so.
High time she had a cosy chat with Caroline about it, so we kind find
out what (if anything) she really feels. I suppose the idea is that
she's too busy worrying about Dannul to think about anyone else. Not in
character to my mind.

Robin Fairbairns

unread,
Jun 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/8/98
to

In article <6lf2c6$fht$5...@heliodor.xara.net>,

Mayes <pe...@bredgar.globalSnet.co.uk> wrote:
>Chris McMillan wrote in message ...
>:boarding school for 12 years [meant no real relationship with father]

>
>So glad I didn't take my father's advice and send mine away to school.

quite right too. i was miserable as sin at boarding school, and there
really was no reason for me to be sent there.

>But whether they are at home or away, the potential complications of the
>childrens' feelings about a new partner can put you off the idea. Though
>not, I would have thought, in Shula's case, with Dannul being so young.

more signficantly, of course, danul never knew mark.

>Getting back to St S, as she obviously now feels uncomfortable in
>Alistair's company I think it's definitely time she told him so (though
>why he's not given up yet anyway I don't know). If she just wants him as
>a friend she should say so.

i think he's finally taken the point, with the debacle on friday night
(if you've not heard it yet, you never will, so no new spoiler tag).

>High time she had a cosy chat with Caroline about it, so we kind find
>out what (if anything) she really feels. I suppose the idea is that
>she's too busy worrying about Dannul to think about anyone else. Not in
>character to my mind.

she has a one-track mind (she apparently believes family and religion
are all part of the same thing). therefore she can't pay any
attention to alistair, who as a result is unlikely ever to become part
of the family.

qed

Robin Fairbairns

unread,
Jun 8, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/8/98
to

In article <neoSLBAP...@redjac.demon.co.uk>,

Robert Carnegie <rja.ca...@mailexcite.com> wrote:
>In article <6l0ief$r6d$1...@lyra.csx.cam.ac.uk>, Robin Fairbairns
><r...@cl.cam.ac.uk> writes
>>what idiot would believe that the grundys were
>>privy to corporate hospitality tickets?
>
>Apparently they _are_ corporate hospitality tickets (which are
>presumably transferrable to someone else, unlike bog-standard
>terrace tickets).

do they have terraces in french association foopball grounds? (i
don't think they do in any of the significant british ones.)

anyway, i would claim that this would *add* to my suspicion about the
matter...

>I suppose that by French standards the Grundy children _might_
>be considered old enough to drink champagne...?

i suppose so, but i bet they wouldn't.

i still maintain that the thread is so completely tenuous as to
destroy one's faith in richard as an intelligent person. otoh, i'm
inclined to suspect that it confirms my long-held belief that he was
incapable of killing mrs barraclough for monetary gain: he just
doesn't have the intelligence to put 2&2 together to come to that sort
of conclusion...

Mayes

unread,
Jun 9, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/9/98
to

Robin Fairbairns in message <6lgb0s$1r$1...@lyra.csx.cam.ac.uk
was discussing Shula when he wrote...
:
:she has a one-track mind (she apparently believes family and religion


:are all part of the same thing).

You're right of course, that must be why I find her so difficult to
relate to, except when she is talking to Caroline who, IIRC has no
religion

K Richard W

unread,
Jun 9, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/9/98
to

In article <6li07h$bn8$1...@heliodor.xara.net>, Mayes
<bre...@globalSnet.co.uk> writes
I suppose that is the only common link with the Shula I remember growing
up and having large numbers of boyfriends. She was always fairly single
minded. For a long time it was the riding (I mean horses - crude minds
some of you).

She has never been quite the same since finding Doris no longer alive in
Glebe Cottage and thereafter never seemed to have quite the same zest
for life, taking a long time to finally marry Mark.

I think she and Alastair are bound to split judging by Friday night
(missed Sunday again - this time I have an even better excuse there was
a Grand Prix on tv and the leaading Merc was the safety car for much of
the race - and Monday). And in all honesty how could either Richard or
the vet believe that either Usha or Shula would be interested in a World
Cup match - out of character for both of them. On the other hand Roof
might have fancied it.

It is not about time that Shula had some real fun - which can be
achieved with/without Danul?
--
K Richard W

J Kyle

unread,
Jun 10, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/10/98
to

> It is not about time that Shula had some real fun

Very nice to see some one actually 'talking' about TA for once!

Robin Fairbairns

unread,
Jun 10, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/10/98
to

In article <XHfVmAAd...@studyroom.demon.co.uk>,

K Richard W <richard....@studyroom.demon.co.uk> wrote:
>In article <6li07h$bn8$1...@heliodor.xara.net>, Mayes
><bre...@globalSnet.co.uk> writes
>>Robin Fairbairns in message <6lgb0s$1r$1...@lyra.csx.cam.ac.uk
>>was discussing Shula when he wrote...
>>:she has a one-track mind (she apparently believes family and religion
>>:are all part of the same thing).
>>
>>You're right of course, that must be why I find her so difficult to
>>relate to, except when she is talking to Caroline who, IIRC has no
>>religion
>
>I suppose that is the only common link with the Shula I remember growing
>up and having large numbers of boyfriends. She was always fairly single
>minded. For a long time it was the riding (I mean horses - crude minds
>some of you).

but the horses were spectacularly boring too: were we really supposed
to believe that <random horsy celebrity> would come and discuss a
possible horsy career with a young woman living in a small, otherwise
obscure, village in a warped region of space-time in the w. midlands?

>She has never been quite the same since finding Doris no longer alive in
>Glebe Cottage and thereafter never seemed to have quite the same zest
>for life, taking a long time to finally marry Mark.

i'm not sure whether it was the sudden accession of security that
doris popping her clogs gave shula, or the inability to make her mind
up about the boring mark, that had me giving up on her entirely.

>I think she and Alastair are bound to split judging by Friday night

i suppose so. alligator's boring enough to be a perfect match,
though, so it's hard to see why (and he continues banging away, even
though it's clear she's not interested).

>(missed Sunday again - this time I have an even better excuse

[gobbledegook omitted]


>And in all honesty how could either Richard or
>the vet believe that either Usha or Shula would be interested in a World
>Cup match - out of character for both of them.

as i've said several times, i think. (maybe not all in umra.)

>On the other hand Roof might have fancied it.

what on earth makes you think that? of course, deavid's not the sort
of person to have got involved in the grundy silliness (in his present
`sensible' incarnation), or were you suggesting that richard would
take her to france, on the rebound from rejection by usha?

>It is not about time that Shula had some real fun - which can be
>achieved with/without Danul?

i presume that should have started "is it"? anyway, i really hope
not: all instances of real fun recently seem either to have involved
excruciating boredom for us listeners (cf caroline/graham in the
lakes) or death and mayhem (this of course being the beetle's idea of
fun).

Charles Norrie

unread,
Jun 10, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/10/98
to

In article <6lliku$b07$1...@lyra.csx.cam.ac.uk>, Robin Fairbairns
<r...@cl.cam.ac.uk> writes

>i'm not sure whether it was the sudden accession of security that
>doris popping her clogs gave shula, or the inability to make her mind
>up about the boring mark, that had me giving up on her entirely.

I did not know that StS had any views on the German currency.

On the other hand I first read this as:

'or the inability to make up her mind about boring mark'

which would have been more interesting and allowed me to have a go at a
BTA.

Chris McMillan

unread,
Jun 10, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/10/98
to

In article <6li07h$bn8$1...@heliodor.xara.net>, Mayes
<URL:mailto:bre...@globalSnet.co.uk> wrote:
>
> Robin Fairbairns in message <6lgb0s$1r$1...@lyra.csx.cam.ac.uk
> was discussing Shula when he wrote...
> :
> :she has a one-track mind (she apparently believes family and religion
> :are all part of the same thing).
>
> You're right of course, that must be why I find her so difficult to
> relate to, except when she is talking to Caroline who, IIRC has no
> religion
>
in the portrait of St S in 'the book' it refers to her Christian faith.

Brenda Selwyn

unread,
Jun 12, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/12/98
to

>r...@cl.cam.ac.uk (Robin Fairbairns) wrote or quoted:

>Mayes <pe...@bredgar.globalSnet.co.uk> wrote:
>>High time she had a cosy chat with Caroline about it, so we kind find
>>out what (if anything) she really feels.

Are you writing the scripts this week by any chance:-)

>>I suppose the idea is that
>>she's too busy worrying about Dannul to think about anyone else. Not in
>>character to my mind.

>she has a one-track mind (she apparently believes family and religion


>are all part of the same thing). therefore she can't pay any
>attention to alistair, who as a result is unlikely ever to become part
>of the family.

This is why I find her initial behavior towards Daniel so strange.
Having been one-track about conceiving him, as soon as he was born she
went back to being one-track about estate agency, whereas one might
have thought that having had a baby (which is a fairly life-changing
experience:-) she might have become one-track about the baby and
unable to think of anything else. But apparently not. This
reinforces my views that none of the SWs have children (actually, we
know that Mary Cutler has, but maybe she wasn't writing those scripts,
or maybe it was too long ago and she's forgotten).

Brennig Jones

unread,
Jun 12, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/12/98
to

The message <ant10201...@mikesounds.demon.co.uk>
from Chris McMillan <Ch...@mikesounds.demon.co.uk> contains these words:

> in the portrait of St S in 'the book' it refers to her Christian faith.

I'm sure it does, but "the book" has demonstrated itself to be
short-memoried and open to all kinds of continuity errors.


B.


Linda

unread,
Jun 12, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/12/98
to

Aming other things Brenda wrote of Shula:

> as soon as he was born she
>went back to being one-track about estate agency,

Perhaps the SWs see Shula as having an obsessive personality. She would
have to be shown to need to want control everything that comes within
her range if this were so. Obsessives like ritual - so that would
explain her interest in being a Church Warden - as she would get to
parade around a bit from time to time and support the acting out of
various Church ritual. Yup -- I'm really getting into this. Perhaps
they'll ask me to do next week's script. I'm ready, eager and keen (not
to mention a tad deluded)

--
Linda

Robin Fairbairns

unread,
Jun 13, 1998, 3:00:00 AM6/13/98