Off-topic: Cooks

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Keith Lucas

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Oct 20, 2005, 4:33:56 PM10/20/05
to
I have just bought a magnificent pumpkin from a neighbour and looked up ways
to cook it. I've found quite a few, but I'd imagined that one option would
be to stuff it. Call me naif if you wish, but I would appreciate your
comments.

Baa,

Keith - a sheep who leisurely passes by

--
"A flock of sheep that leisurely pass by,
One after one; the sound of rain, and bees
Murmuring; the fall of rivers, winds and seas,
Smooth fields, white sheets of water, and pure sky;
I have thought of all by turns, and yet do lie
Sleepless!" (Wordsworth)

chris mcmillan

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Oct 20, 2005, 5:16:07 PM10/20/05
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In message <11298424...@leri.aber.ac.uk>, Keith Lucas
<k...@aber.ac.uk> writes

>
>but I'd imagined that one option would
>be to stuff it. Call me naif if you wish, but I would appreciate your
>comments.
>
Are you thinking of serving it to a *lot* of sheep? They might be
considered a bit big for stuffing.

Neither my vegetarian cookery book, nor my very old (same book as Jenny
MB) has, has pumpkin stuffed. Soup or a pie.

Sincerely Chris
--
Chris McMillan
http://www.chinavision.org.uk/

Nick Odell

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Oct 20, 2005, 5:49:37 PM10/20/05
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On Thu, 20 Oct 2005 21:16:07 GMT, chris mcmillan <spam...@ntlworld.com> wrote:

>In message <11298424...@leri.aber.ac.uk>, Keith Lucas
><k...@aber.ac.uk> writes
>>
>>but I'd imagined that one option would
>>be to stuff it. Call me naif if you wish, but I would appreciate your
>>comments.
>>
>Are you thinking of serving it to a *lot* of sheep? They might be
>considered a bit big for stuffing.
>
>Neither my vegetarian cookery book, nor my very old (same book as Jenny
>MB) has, has pumpkin stuffed. Soup or a pie.
>

I've got a couple of Argentine recipies (one veggie, one not) that I'm hoping to
try soon - both involve baking the scooped-out pumpkin in the oven, filling it
with the previously prepared ingredients then continuing to bake it all, using
the pumpkin as an edible casserole-pot. I'll happily post one or other (or both)
here now if anyone is interested, though it might be better to wait until I have
actually tried them out first.

I have a question though: Sainsbury is selling pumpkins from two piles: one
marked Halloween Pumpkins and priced at not-very-much each and the other marked
Edible Pumpkins which are priced by the kilo. Is this just a marketing pitch or
would a Halloween pumpkin have come from a pithy, fibrous, tasteless
grown-for-a-big-size stock and the "edible" version turn out to be more tasty?

Nick O
--
real e-mail is themusicworkshop at ntlworld dot com

Julian Day

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Oct 21, 2005, 3:17:50 AM10/21/05
to

"Keith Lucas" <k...@aber.ac.uk> wrote in message
news:11298424...@leri.aber.ac.uk...
> <snip> I've found quite a few, but I'd imagined that one option would

> be to stuff it. Call me naif if you wish, but I would appreciate your
> comments.

Oh my! I read the title of this thread as "Off-topic: Cocks" and was in
mid-boggle before I saw the light :-)

J


Keith Lucas

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Oct 20, 2005, 5:40:06 PM10/20/05
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"chris mcmillan" <spam...@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:QvYlDaKX...@chris.mcmillan...

> In message <11298424...@leri.aber.ac.uk>, Keith Lucas
> <k...@aber.ac.uk> writes
> >
> >but I'd imagined that one option would
> >be to stuff it. Call me naif if you wish, but I would appreciate your
> >comments.
> >
> Are you thinking of serving it to a *lot* of sheep? They might be
> considered a bit big for stuffing.
>

Well we're quite a big flock, as you know. Alternatively one sheep with a
big appetite and a ewe with a smaller one might spread it over a few days.

Baa-aa baa baa (at the prospect)

Keith


Penny

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Oct 21, 2005, 11:56:49 AM10/21/05
to
On Thu, 20 Oct 2005 21:49:37 GMT, Nick Odell a gribouillé dans la
poussière...

>I have a question though: Sainsbury is selling pumpkins from two piles: one
>marked Halloween Pumpkins and priced at not-very-much each and the other marked
>Edible Pumpkins which are priced by the kilo. Is this just a marketing pitch or
>would a Halloween pumpkin have come from a pithy, fibrous, tasteless
>grown-for-a-big-size stock and the "edible" version turn out to be more tasty?

That seems a reasonable assumption.
--
Penny
The problem is we live in a blame culture - whose fault's that?
umra Nicknames & Abbreviations http://www.umra.freeuk.com/nicks.html

Stephen

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Oct 21, 2005, 2:19:32 PM10/21/05
to
According to the opalescent prose of "Keith Lucas" <k...@aber.ac.uk> :

>I have just bought a magnificent pumpkin from a neighbour and looked up ways
>to cook it. I've found quite a few, but I'd imagined that one option would
>be to stuff it. Call me naif if you wish, but I would appreciate your
>comments.

I once did a pumpkin soup which involved taking the seeds 'n' string
out, chucking in some stock, cream and gruyere, and baking it, taking
regular opportunities to scrape the flesh from the inside as it cooked
in the liquid. Very rich.

Otherwise Pumpkin Pie is my preferred option - chop up the pumpkin,
bake it, mix the baked shredded flesh with eggs, cream, sugar and
spices, and bake in a pie.

Stuffing a pumpkin seems a bit odd, because the skin is inedible, so
you would have to unstuff it to eat it.

--
Stephen <http://wenlock.blogspot.com/>

Into my heart an air that kills from yon far country blows:
What are those blue remembered hills, what spires, what farms are those?
That is the land of lost content, I see it shining plain,
The happy highways where I went and cannot come again.

chris mcmillan

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Oct 21, 2005, 4:07:29 PM10/21/05
to
In message <11298930...@leri.aber.ac.uk>, Keith Lucas
<k...@aber.ac.uk> writes
>
>"chris mcmillan" <spam...@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
>news:QvYlDaKX...@chris.mcmillan...
>> In message <11298424...@leri.aber.ac.uk>, Keith Lucas
>> <k...@aber.ac.uk> writes
>> >
>> >but I'd imagined that one option would
>> >be to stuff it. Call me naif if you wish, but I would appreciate your
>> >comments.
>> >
>> Are you thinking of serving it to a *lot* of sheep? They might be
>> considered a bit big for stuffing.
>>
>
>Well we're quite a big flock, as you know.
>
If all of you (except the real littlies of course) ate a pumpkin you'd
certainly put one of those away. The blessed Delia must have something
on the subject. I will investigate.

chris mcmillan

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Oct 21, 2005, 5:02:59 PM10/21/05
to
In message <4359302...@News.individual.net>, Stephen
<stephe...@yahoo.com> writes

>According to the opalescent prose of "Keith Lucas" <k...@aber.ac.uk> :
>
>>I have just bought a magnificent pumpkin from a neighbour and looked up ways
>>to cook it. I've found quite a few, but I'd imagined that one option would
>>be to stuff it. Call me naif if you wish, but I would appreciate your
>>comments.
>
The blessed Delia doesn't rate the Halloween type pumpkins : tasteless
is her verdict. I can find no 'stuffed' recipes at all as far as
pumpkin is concerned.

I suppose you could follow a squash type recipe and adjust cooking
times.

Niles

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Oct 21, 2005, 8:36:35 PM10/21/05
to
stephe...@yahoo.com (Stephen) wrote:

|I once did a pumpkin soup which involved taking the seeds 'n' string
|out, chucking in some stock, cream and gruyere, and baking it, taking
|regular opportunities to scrape the flesh from the inside as it cooked
|in the liquid. Very rich.

That sounds interesting, do you have more specifics?

We currently have a big green thing that is like a pumpkin only, er, green,
that we have no idea what to do with. It was grown on a friend's allotment,
so we don't like to hack it to pieces and compost it, which was the first
thought.

We also have a coconut we're unsure what to do with. That wasn't grown on
an allotment, however.

n

--
Niles, Nottingham |
ICQ UIN 12724766 | Nitroglycerin
www.alexfoster.me.uk | is extremely temperamental
flickr.com/photos/niles |

Stephen

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Oct 22, 2005, 4:51:54 AM10/22/05
to
According to the opalescent prose of Niles <alex....@zetnet.co.uk>
:

>stephe...@yahoo.com (Stephen) wrote:
>
>|I once did a pumpkin soup which involved taking the seeds 'n' string
>|out, chucking in some stock, cream and gruyere, and baking it, taking
>|regular opportunities to scrape the flesh from the inside as it cooked
>|in the liquid. Very rich.
>
>That sounds interesting, do you have more specifics?
>
>We currently have a big green thing that is like a pumpkin only, er, green,
>that we have no idea what to do with. It was grown on a friend's allotment,
>so we don't like to hack it to pieces and compost it, which was the first
>thought.

Mireille Johnston, she say:

140g finely chopped shallots
70g unsalted butter
225g diced bread toasted
salt
freshly ground black pepper
170g grated cheese (Gruyere, Permesan or Romano)
1 2.75Kg pumpkin
1.1l single cream
freshly grated nutmeg
2 bay leaves

cook shallots in 40g butter over low heat for 10 mins. Add bread and
cook for 2 more mins. Sprinkle with s&p and add the cheese. Set
aside.

preheat oven to 200/400/GM6.

cut top off pumpkin, reserve lid. remove seeds with a long-handled
spoon. sprinkle salt over inside and outside of pumpkin. fill with
mixture of shallots, bread and cheese. stir in cream, s&p, nutmeg and
bay leaves. replace lid on pumpkin.

bake for 2 hours on large ovenproof dish. twice during cooking lift
top, stir vigorously, reaching into pumpkin with long handled spoon.

when ready to serve, place pumpkin over folded napkin on a shallow
serving plate. check seasoning, stir carefully, add remaining butter
and serve.

>We also have a coconut we're unsure what to do with. That wasn't grown on
>an allotment, however.

Throwing little wooden balls at it is traditional.

Jenny M Benson

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Oct 22, 2005, 5:28:09 AM10/22/05
to
In message <892jl157oqplppjd9...@4ax.com>, Niles
<alex....@zetnet.co.uk> writes

>We also have a coconut we're unsure what to do with.

Chop it in half and hang it from your bird table - or handy tree branch
if you don't have a bird table. (As you'll have 2 halves you could do
both.)
--
Jenny
"I always like to have the morning well-aired before I get up."
(Beau Brummel, 1778-1840)

Robin Fairbairns

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Oct 22, 2005, 7:47:54 AM10/22/05
to
Niles <alex....@zetnet.co.uk> writes:
>stephe...@yahoo.com (Stephen) wrote:
>|I once did a pumpkin soup which involved taking the seeds 'n' string
>|out, chucking in some stock, cream and gruyere, and baking it, taking
>|regular opportunities to scrape the flesh from the inside as it cooked
>|in the liquid. Very rich.
>
>That sounds interesting, do you have more specifics?
>
>We currently have a big green thing that is like a pumpkin only, er, green,
>that we have no idea what to do with. It was grown on a friend's allotment,
>so we don't like to hack it to pieces and compost it, which was the first
>thought.

more or less anything you can do with it will involve hacking it about
a bit. surely you should hack a bit off the top and see if it's (er)
pumpkin-like inside?

>We also have a coconut we're unsure what to do with. That wasn't grown on
>an allotment, however.

the problem being you don't like coconut? or is it getting into it?
in the latter case, you might try my technique, which is to hit it
with the back of my cleaver along its midline, turning it round and
round as i hit it. eventually the shell cracks in half, and all you
have to do is cut through the flesh and you have two half-coconuts.

of course, if you don't like the stuff, this doesn't help. perhaps
you could take it to a political rally and use it as a weapon of mass
protest?
--
Robin (http://www.tex.ac.uk/faq) Fairbairns, Cambridge

Penny

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Oct 22, 2005, 10:34:54 AM10/22/05
to
On Sat, 22 Oct 2005 01:36:35 +0100, Niles a gribouillé dans la poussière...

>We also have a coconut we're unsure what to do with.

Eat it.

Grate it into salad or curry - it will cool down a hot one. Try not to
break too many knives getting the flesh out. TNMF has beaten me to the (I'm
told) proper method of opening the thing but neglected to mention that if
you want to drink the milk you need to get that out first by drilling* into
two of the three "eyes". If you have a straw handy, push that into one of
the holes and either suck the milk out directly or pour it from the hole
without the straw.

*a metal skewer will usually do the trick

Mike McMillan

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Oct 22, 2005, 12:49:37 PM10/22/05
to
>stephe...@yahoo.com (Stephen) wrote:
>
>|I once did a pumpkin soup which involved taking the seeds 'n' string
>|out, chucking in some stock, cream and gruyere, and baking it, taking
>|regular opportunities to scrape the flesh from the inside as it cooked
>|in the liquid. Very rich.
>
>That sounds interesting, do you have more specifics?
>
>We currently have a big green thing that is like a pumpkin only, er, green,
>that we have no idea what to do with. It was grown on a friend's allotment,
>so we don't like to hack it to pieces and compost it, which was the first
>thought.
>
>We also have a coconut we're unsure what to do with. That wasn't grown on
>an allotment, however.
>
>n
>
At the risk of waking BrritSki ... Tits like Coconuts! Just crack the
shell into halves, drill a small hole in each half so that you may
thread some string, wire or cord through the hole and hang them in the
garden.

Toodle Peck,

Mike
--
Mike McMillan,
The email address is spam trapped but any genuine communications may be sent to
mike dot mcmillan at ntlworld dot com

"Let's all calm down shall we? Let's forget there is a llama in here at all."
(Lynda Snell, 010603)

Tel: (+44) 0118 9265450. website: <http://homepage.ntlworld.com/mike.mcmillan/>

Niles

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Oct 22, 2005, 4:14:45 PM10/22/05
to
Penny <sp...@labyrinth.freeuk.com> wrote:

|On Sat, 22 Oct 2005 01:36:35 +0100, Niles a gribouillé dans la poussière...
|

|Eat it.

:)

We knew about getting the milk out. There was about 5 dessert spoons of
milk, which had a funny UHT smell. The flesh itself has a really odd soapy
taste to it that neither of us likes. Is this normal or has the thing gone
off?

We suspect the birds might end up profiting.

Niles

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Oct 22, 2005, 4:15:16 PM10/22/05
to
stephe...@yahoo.com (Stephen) wrote:

|1.1l single cream

Blimey!

BrritSki

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Oct 22, 2005, 4:51:59 PM10/22/05
to
Niles wrote:

> We suspect the birds might end up profiting.
>

That must be a first in the Niles' household ! ;)

Niles

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Oct 22, 2005, 5:09:39 PM10/22/05
to
BrritSki <Brri...@iname.com> wrote:

Literally LOL :)

Keith Lucas

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Oct 22, 2005, 2:17:51 AM10/22/05
to

"Stephen" <stephe...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:4359302...@News.individual.net...

> According to the opalescent prose of "Keith Lucas" <k...@aber.ac.uk> :
>
> >I have just bought a magnificent pumpkin from a neighbour and looked up
ways
> >to cook it. I've found quite a few, but I'd imagined that one option
would
> >be to stuff it. Call me naif if you wish, but I would appreciate your
> >comments.
>

> Stuffing a pumpkin seems a bit odd, because the skin is inedible, so


> you would have to unstuff it to eat it.
>

Not odd at all and I think you answered your own question half a day later.
It seems to me that you can stuff almost any edible object with other edible
objects (okay, savoury with savoury, etc) and hope for a good result.

Alfred Marks told a good joke about stuffing sheep, by the way, but that's
another matter.

Baa,

Keith


Keith Lucas

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Oct 22, 2005, 2:20:59 AM10/22/05
to

"Mike McMillan" <tinne...@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:5W552UBZ...@mike.mcmillan...

> At the risk of waking BrritSki ... Tits like Coconuts! Just crack the

I submit that this is Mike's best pun yet. Old UMRA hands please address
this question.

Baa-ha-ha-ha

Keith


Robin Fairbairns

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Oct 22, 2005, 7:39:28 PM10/22/05
to
"Keith Lucas" <k...@aber.ac.uk> writes:
>"Stephen" <stephe...@yahoo.com> wrote...

>> According to the opalescent prose of "Keith Lucas" <k...@aber.ac.uk> :
>>
>> >I have just bought a magnificent pumpkin from a neighbour and
>> >looked up ways to cook it. I've found quite a few, but I'd
>> >imagined that one option would be to stuff it. Call me naif if you
>> >wish, but I would appreciate your comments.
>>
>> Stuffing a pumpkin seems a bit odd, because the skin is inedible, so
>> you would have to unstuff it to eat it.
>
>Not odd at all and I think you answered your own question half a day later.
>It seems to me that you can stuff almost any edible object with other edible
>objects (okay, savoury with savoury, etc) and hope for a good result.

i made a rather pleasing pumpkin and beef stew, with peaches, which i
cooked in the pumpkin. does this count? is it counted as sweet or
savoury ('cos it was pretty damned sweet, though most pleasing in most
respects).

>Alfred Marks told a good joke about stuffing sheep, by the way, but that's
>another matter.

so did woody allen, but that's another matter still.

Jane Vernon

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Oct 23, 2005, 3:55:51 AM10/23/05
to
Niles wrote:

<coconut>


> We knew about getting the milk out. There was about 5 dessert spoons
> of milk, which had a funny UHT smell. The flesh itself has a really
> odd soapy taste to it that neither of us likes. Is this normal or
> has the thing gone off?

I think it might have. Soapiness is, IME, exactly the taste all nuts have
once they have gone off. I got back into jam-making this year and I suspect
this is the reason we have been eating less peanut butter than usual. Even
so, I am amazed that even a jar of peanut butter has gone 'soapy'. It sits
there in the cupboard now, wasting space. It is too unpleasant to eat (IMO)
and yet I feel it would be wasted to compost it. I daresay eventually the
compost will win. I would offer it to the birds but I assume there is too
much salt and sugar in peanut butter to be good for them.

--
Jane
The Potter in the Purple Socks
www.clothandclay
www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook/contents.htm for recipes provided by
umrats


Stephen

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Oct 23, 2005, 4:13:30 AM10/23/05
to
According to the opalescent prose of Niles <alex....@zetnet.co.uk>
:

>stephe...@yahoo.com (Stephen) wrote:
>
>|1.1l single cream
>
>Blimey!

The imperial alternative is 2pts, so it is not a typo. MJ does say
that it is a rich dish.

Linda Fox

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Oct 23, 2005, 5:27:59 AM10/23/05
to
On 22 Oct 2005 23:39:28 GMT, r...@cl.cam.ac.uk (Robin Fairbairns) wrote:


>i made a rather pleasing pumpkin and beef stew,

He's being modest. He made a b***** marvellous pumpkin soup on Friday
evening too, so thick it was almost sliceable. I thought it might have
had coconut in it by the taste, but he said the texture was all from
the cream and the pumpkin. I had thought pumpkin didn't have an
interesting taste of its own, but TNMF may have brought it out in that
soup. mmmmmmm

lff

Jane Vernon

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Oct 23, 2005, 7:57:58 AM10/23/05
to
Jane Vernon wrote:
> Niles wrote:
>
> <coconut>
>> We knew about getting the milk out. There was about 5 dessert spoons
>> of milk, which had a funny UHT smell. The flesh itself has a really
>> odd soapy taste to it that neither of us likes. Is this normal or
>> has the thing gone off?
>
> I think it might have. Soapiness is, IME, exactly the taste all nuts
> have once they have gone off. I got back into jam-making this year
> and I suspect this is the reason we have been eating less peanut
> butter than usual. Even so, I am amazed that even a jar of peanut
> butter has gone 'soapy'. It sits there in the cupboard now, wasting
> space. It is too unpleasant to eat (IMO) and yet I feel it would be
> wasted to compost it. I daresay eventually the compost will win. I
> would offer it to the birds but I assume there is too much salt and
> sugar in peanut butter to be good for them.

Sorry to follow up self. But I have just discovered that the peanut butter
is ok if topped with tomato chutney which has inadvertently been made with
too many chillies. This may not be as obscure information as it first
appears: perhaps the soapy coconut would still have a use in curry?

chris mcmillan

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Oct 23, 2005, 11:58:42 AM10/23/05
to
In message <11300230...@leri.aber.ac.uk>, Keith Lucas
<k...@aber.ac.uk> writes
>
Looks sternly in the direction of North Wales. Please, Mr Sheep, do not
encourage this habit.

wofe of McToodles (wondering whether ntl will even post news items now)

chris mcmillan

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Oct 23, 2005, 12:00:42 PM10/23/05
to
In message <11300230...@leri.aber.ac.uk>, Keith Lucas
<k...@aber.ac.uk> writes
>
>"Stephen" <stephe...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>news:4359302...@News.individual.net...
>> According to the opalescent prose of "Keith Lucas" <k...@aber.ac.uk> :
>>
>> >I have just bought a magnificent pumpkin from a neighbour and looked up
>ways
>> >to cook it. I've found quite a few, but I'd imagined that one option
>would
>> >be to stuff it. Call me naif if you wish, but I would appreciate your
>> >comments.
>>
>
>> Stuffing a pumpkin seems a bit odd, because the skin is inedible, so
>> you would have to unstuff it to eat it.
>>
>
>Not odd at all

Next week's Food Prog at 12.30 lunch time (so next SUNDAY edition) is
all about eating gourds, and pumpkin is mentioned specifically. Its
repeated Monday at 4pm, Keith.

Sincerely Chris

chris mcmillan

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Oct 23, 2005, 12:00:42 PM10/23/05
to
In message <0olml15dcuvh87u2b...@4ax.com>, Linda Fox
<lind...@ntlworld.com> writes

>On 22 Oct 2005 23:39:28 GMT, r...@cl.cam.ac.uk (Robin Fairbairns) wrote:
>
>
>>i made a rather pleasing pumpkin and beef stew,
>
>He's being modest. He made a b***** marvellous pumpkin soup

Come on then: hand it over. We all want to know.

Jenny M Benson

unread,
Oct 23, 2005, 12:11:31 PM10/23/05
to
In message <Xmk0BlAk...@chris.mcmillan>, chris mcmillan
<spam...@ntlworld.com> writes

>Looks sternly in the direction of North Wales.

Not north *east* Wales, I hope!

Linda Fox

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Oct 23, 2005, 12:16:19 PM10/23/05
to
On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 16:00:42 GMT, chris mcmillan
<spam...@ntlworld.com> wrote:

>In message <0olml15dcuvh87u2b...@4ax.com>, Linda Fox
><lind...@ntlworld.com> writes
>>On 22 Oct 2005 23:39:28 GMT, r...@cl.cam.ac.uk (Robin Fairbairns) wrote:
>>
>>
>>>i made a rather pleasing pumpkin and beef stew,
>>
>>He's being modest. He made a b***** marvellous pumpkin soup
>
>Come on then: hand it over. We all want to know.
>

Sorry, we ate it all. Wait a minute, I'll put me fingers down me
throat for you, shall I?

I don't reckon it'll taste the same, though

lff

Nick Odell

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Oct 23, 2005, 12:53:44 PM10/23/05
to
On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 15:58:42 GMT, chris mcmillan <spam...@ntlworld.com> wrote:

>....(wondering whether ntl will even post news items now)

Oh good, it's not just me, then. Or rather, no it's not good for either of us :(
The e-mail problem seems to have been going on for days.

Nick O
--
real e-mail is themusicworkshop at ntlworld dot com

Siderius Nuncius

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Oct 23, 2005, 1:20:09 PM10/23/05
to

"Linda Fox" <lind...@ntlworld.com> wrote

> Wait a minute, I'll put me fingers down me
> throat for you, shall I?

Hang on a minute - don't we need to go into the woods first, so you can eat
the bacon on a str...eh?

Oh, sorry. See what you mean now.

I *thought* it might be rather a lot extra.
--
Sid
Make sure Matron is away when you reply


Siderius Nuncius

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Oct 23, 2005, 1:17:30 PM10/23/05
to

"Nick Odell" <gurzhfvp...@ntlworld.com> wrote
> chris mcmillan <spam...@ntlworld.com> wrote:

>>....(wondering whether ntl will even post news items now)
>
> Oh good, it's not just me, then. Or rather, no it's not good for either of
> us :(
> The e-mail problem seems to have been going on for days.

Ah. Not just Tesco, then. I think they use ntl in some way, because AVG
always tells me it's connected to ntl, and Tesco has been very dodgy on the
email front for three days now. Bit of a now-you-see-it-now-you-don't job,
and just at the moment, I don't. Good old Berlin seems fine, though.

Mike McMillan

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Oct 23, 2005, 3:22:27 PM10/23/05
to
In message <nudnl19abqqu2712k...@4ax.com>, Linda Fox
<lind...@ntlworld.com> writes
>On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 16:00:42 GMT, chris mcmillan
><spam...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
>
>>In message <0olml15dcuvh87u2b...@4ax.com>, Linda Fox
>><lind...@ntlworld.com> writes
>>>On 22 Oct 2005 23:39:28 GMT, r...@cl.cam.ac.uk (Robin Fairbairns) wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>i made a rather pleasing pumpkin and beef stew,
>>>
>>>He's being modest. He made a b***** marvellous pumpkin soup
>>
>>Come on then: hand it over. We all want to know.
>>
>Sorry, we ate it all. Wait a minute, I'll put me fingers down me
>throat for you, shall I?
>
>I don't reckon it'll taste the same, though
>
>lff

Pukekin Soup? Err .... no not today if you don't mind.

Robin Fairbairns

unread,
Oct 23, 2005, 3:35:49 PM10/23/05
to chris.m...@ntlworld.com
chris mcmillan <spam...@ntlworld.com> writes:
>Linda Fox <lind...@ntlworld.com> writes

>>He's being modest. He made a b***** marvellous pumpkin soup
>
>Come on then: hand it over. We all want to know.

http://www.rivernene.co.uk/en/recipes/recipe.php?recipeid=171&catid=2 [*]

as modified for half quantities in a half-aware fashion. i can't
remember exactly what i did, except that i found we didn't have more
than a couple of small bits of dried bay leaves, so i put rosemary in
too.

[*] rivernene sold us the pumpkin: it came in our veg box last week.
their recipe site is rather good, i find (they print out a couple with
the leaflet in each week's box).

chris mcmillan

unread,
Oct 23, 2005, 3:35:14 PM10/23/05
to
In message <gw1X6MIz...@cedarbank81.fsnet.co.uk>, Jenny M Benson
<j...@cedarbank81.fsnet.co.uk> writes

>In message <Xmk0BlAk...@chris.mcmillan>, chris mcmillan
><spam...@ntlworld.com> writes
>>Looks sternly in the direction of North Wales.
>
>Not north *east* Wales, I hope!

You're safe :-)

Sincerely Chris

chris mcmillan

unread,
Oct 23, 2005, 3:37:14 PM10/23/05
to
In message <435bbedb...@text.news.ntlworld.com>, Nick Odell
<gurzhfvp...@ntlworld.com> writes

>On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 15:58:42 GMT, chris mcmillan <spam...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
>
>>....(wondering whether ntl will even post news items now)
>
>Oh good, it's not just me, then. Or rather, no it's not good for either
>of us :(
>The e-mail problem seems to have been going on for days.
>
48 hours so far for me, but Toodles has been muttering longer than that.
And earlier I couldn't even raise their home page - but at this actual
nanno-second all seems hunky dory. It *won't* last.

Sincerely Chris

chris mcmillan

unread,
Oct 23, 2005, 3:43:14 PM10/23/05
to
In message <nudnl19abqqu2712k...@4ax.com>, Linda Fox
<lind...@ntlworld.com> writes
>On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 16:00:42 GMT, chris mcmillan
><spam...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
>
>>In message <0olml15dcuvh87u2b...@4ax.com>, Linda Fox
>><lind...@ntlworld.com> writes
>>>On 22 Oct 2005 23:39:28 GMT, r...@cl.cam.ac.uk (Robin Fairbairns) wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>i made a rather pleasing pumpkin and beef stew,
>>>
>>>He's being modest. He made a b***** marvellous pumpkin soup
>>
>>Come on then: hand it over. We all want to know.
>>
>Sorry, we ate it all.

LFF!!!! We *want* the recipe. Or is he like Toodles: never the same
ingredients two days together?

chris mcmillan

unread,
Oct 23, 2005, 3:45:14 PM10/23/05
to
In message <djgoml$6j6$1...@gemini.csx.cam.ac.uk>, Robin Fairbairns
<r...@cl.cam.ac.uk> writes

> chris mcmillan <spam...@ntlworld.com> writes:
>>Linda Fox <lind...@ntlworld.com> writes
>>>He's being modest. He made a b***** marvellous pumpkin soup
>>
>>Come on then: hand it over. We all want to know.
>
>http://www.rivernene.co.uk/en/recipes/recipe.php?recipeid=171&catid=2 [*]
>
Smiles *very* sweetly in Robin's direction.

Nick Odell

unread,
Oct 23, 2005, 3:48:31 PM10/23/05
to
On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 19:37:14 GMT, chris mcmillan <spam...@ntlworld.com> wrote:

>In message <435bbedb...@text.news.ntlworld.com>, Nick Odell
><gurzhfvp...@ntlworld.com> writes
>>On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 15:58:42 GMT, chris mcmillan <spam...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
>>
>>>....(wondering whether ntl will even post news items now)
>>
>>Oh good, it's not just me, then. Or rather, no it's not good for either
>>of us :(
>>The e-mail problem seems to have been going on for days.
>>
>48 hours so far for me, but Toodles has been muttering longer than that.
>And earlier I couldn't even raise their home page - but at this actual
>nanno-second all seems hunky dory. It *won't* last.
>

There's always http://www.ntl-isp.ntl.com/ServiceStatus/ to check up on the
current situation - but I'm not convinced that it is accurate.[1] (Saying things
are working when I know they are not; saying the problem only lasted a short
while, etc) Apparently the home page is working again now.

Nick O
[1]Threadmerge. I wonder if a nice man from ntl is now going to pop into umra to
say sorry for the outages etc?

Penny

unread,
Oct 23, 2005, 5:05:30 PM10/23/05
to
On 23 Oct 2005 19:35:49 GMT, Robin Fairbairns a gribouillé dans la
poussière...

>i found we didn't have more
>than a couple of small bits of dried bay leaves,

If you are down this way soon you are welcome to take a branch-full of bay
leaves back with you.
--
Penny
The problem is we live in a blame culture - whose fault's that?
umra Nicknames & Abbreviations http://www.umra.freeuk.com/nicks.html

Gumrat

unread,
Oct 23, 2005, 5:21:24 PM10/23/05
to
chris mcmillan wrote:
> In message <djgoml$6j6$1...@gemini.csx.cam.ac.uk>, Robin Fairbairns
> <r...@cl.cam.ac.uk> writes
>
>> chris mcmillan <spam...@ntlworld.com> writes:
>>
>>> Linda Fox <lind...@ntlworld.com> writes
>>>
>>>> He's being modest. He made a b***** marvellous pumpkin soup
>>>
>>>
>>> Come on then: hand it over. We all want to know.
>>
>>
>> http://www.rivernene.co.uk/en/recipes/recipe.php?recipeid=171&catid=2 [*]
>>
> Smiles *very* sweetly in Robin's direction.

Looks wonderfully yummy. I'll try it next time I make pumpkin soup.

In case anyone's interested, the Greeks in this house enjoy the addition
of honey and cinnamon, à discretion, to any recipe for pumpkin soup :-)

--
Tout de bonbon,
Anne, Seriously, Traditionally Built Gumrat

Jenny M Benson

unread,
Oct 24, 2005, 3:54:59 AM10/24/05
to
In message <+RzO8cL7...@chris.mcmillan>, chris mcmillan
<spam...@ntlworld.com> writes

>>http://www.rivernene.co.uk/en/recipes/recipe.php?recipeid=171&catid=2 [*]
>>
>Smiles *very* sweetly in Robin's direction.

There you are, you see, North Wales: that's how it's done!

Jo Lonergan

unread,
Oct 24, 2005, 6:29:50 AM10/24/05
to
On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 12:57:58 +0100, "Jane Vernon"
<ja...@clothandclay.co.uk> wrote:

>Sorry to follow up self. But I have just discovered that the peanut butter
>is ok if topped with tomato chutney which has inadvertently been made with
>too many chillies. This may not be as obscure information as it first
>appears: perhaps the soapy coconut would still have a use in curry?

Erm, should we be eating gone-off nuts? AIUI oxidised oils can be
quite unhealthy.

--
Jo

Jane Vernon

unread,
Oct 24, 2005, 8:02:02 AM10/24/05
to

Ooh, I didn't know anything about that :(
How do people get round the problem of keeping a variety of nuts in store
and always ensuring they are all used before going off at all?

Kim Andrews

unread,
Oct 24, 2005, 9:50:17 AM10/24/05
to
On Mon, 24 Oct 2005 13:02:02 +0100, "Jane Vernon"
<ja...@clothandclay.co.uk> wrote:

>How do people get round the problem of keeping a variety of nuts in store
>and always ensuring they are all used before going off at all?

I do this by having a variety of nuts consisting of blanched almonds,
blanched almonds and blanched almonds. I find with this available,
using them before they go off is not a problem. On the other hand, in
this country it seems to me that *buying* most nuts before they go
off, or at least are well past being worth eating, is almost
impossible.


--
Cheers, Kimbo (Keeper of the Languid Wave (tm))
Best of umra archive www.totternhoe.demon.co.uk/umra/

www.bykimbo.com

BrritSki

unread,
Oct 24, 2005, 11:28:57 AM10/24/05
to
Kim Andrews wrote:
> On Mon, 24 Oct 2005 13:02:02 +0100, "Jane Vernon"
> <ja...@clothandclay.co.uk> wrote:
>
>
>>How do people get round the problem of keeping a variety of nuts in store
>>and always ensuring they are all used before going off at all?
>
>
> I do this by having a variety of nuts consisting of blanched almonds,
> blanched almonds and blanched almonds. I find with this available,
> using them before they go off is not a problem. On the other hand, in
> this country it seems to me that *buying* most nuts before they go
> off, or at least are well past being worth eating, is almost
> impossible.
>
>
Local village had its chestnut festival yesterday, I think they roasted
close to a ton of nuts on a big open fire in the main square, in huge
metal pans suspended olver the fire on chains and with long handles so
they could be flipped and turned.
They were fantastic, perfectly cooked, peeled really easily and tasted
delicious. The chestnut beer was surprisingly good too.

Yesterday was the first day we had some sun since the pool was filled so
we had a formal opening with a ribbon ceremony and me diving in, which I
instantly regretted as it was only 15 degrees ! The winter cover can go
on now as we can say we swam in the pool in 2005. :)

Sea however is still lovely, picnic on the beach today and several dips
followed by drying off in the warm sun. Lovely.

Jane Vernon

unread,
Oct 24, 2005, 11:48:14 AM10/24/05
to
Kim Andrews wrote:
> On Mon, 24 Oct 2005 13:02:02 +0100, "Jane Vernon"
> <ja...@clothandclay.co.uk> wrote:
>
>> How do people get round the problem of keeping a variety of nuts in
>> store and always ensuring they are all used before going off at all?
>
> I do this by having a variety of nuts consisting of blanched almonds,
> blanched almonds and blanched almonds. I find with this available,
> using them before they go off is not a problem.

Ah yes, come to think of it I don't have the problem with blanched almonds.
I buy them in bulk, too. Perhaps they are better at keeping?

On the other hand, in
> this country it seems to me that *buying* most nuts before they go
> off, or at least are well past being worth eating, is almost
> impossible.

This could also be part of the problem/solution, perhaps. The blanched
almonds I buy in bulk and keep happily for at least a year are obtained from
an Indian shop. Perhaps they have better suppliers?

Andy Minter

unread,
Oct 24, 2005, 1:20:06 PM10/24/05
to
On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 18:20:09 +0100, "Siderius Nuncius"
<matron....@tesco.net> wrote:

>
>"Linda Fox" <lind...@ntlworld.com> wrote
>
>> Wait a minute, I'll put me fingers down me
>> throat for you, shall I?
>
>Hang on a minute - don't we need to go into the woods first, so you can eat
>the bacon on a str...eh?
>

I'm delighted to find that I have completely forgotten what that
refers to.
Having a bad memory can be quite useful at times.
--
Andy Minter

Kim Andrews

unread,
Oct 24, 2005, 1:24:31 PM10/24/05
to
On Mon, 24 Oct 2005 18:20:06 +0100, Andy Minter <an...@nildram.co.uk>
wrote:

I was distressed to find any details given at all, as I'd carefully
avoided the original information, acting on umratic advice. Nugger!

Robin Fairbairns

unread,
Oct 24, 2005, 2:51:35 PM10/24/05
to
Penny <sp...@labyrinth.freeuk.com> writes:
>On 23 Oct 2005 19:35:49 GMT, Robin Fairbairns a gribouillé dans la
>poussière...
>
>>i found we didn't have more
>>than a couple of small bits of dried bay leaves,
>
>If you are down this way soon you are welcome to take a branch-full of bay
>leaves back with you.

coo, there's an offer and a half... and as it happens (what with my
mother being laid up for so long[*]) i shall be in kent in a couple of
weeks time (or maybe it's three -- we're doing w/ends in rotation).

i'ld like to see your place before you fly away, anyway.

[*] she's getting better, and has just gone upstairs for the first
time since the accident -- celebrating her new stair-lift. the silly
think is, my sister and i were discussing the possibility of a
stair-lift less than a week before mum fell; we were worried that she
wouldn't accept the idea...

Robin Fairbairns

unread,
Oct 24, 2005, 2:55:12 PM10/24/05
to
Gumrat <Gum...@hotmail.co.uk> writes:
>chris mcmillan wrote:
>> Robin Fairbairns <r...@cl.cam.ac.uk> writes

>>> http://www.rivernene.co.uk/en/recipes/recipe.php?recipeid=171&catid=2 [*]
>>
>> Smiles *very* sweetly in Robin's direction.
>
>Looks wonderfully yummy. I'll try it next time I make pumpkin soup.

trouble was, i (with my oh-so-svelte frame) found it a bit overfacing.

>In case anyone's interested, the Greeks in this house enjoy the addition
>of honey and cinnamon, à discretion, to any recipe for pumpkin soup :-)

i suspect the fact that linda read this post out to me,

v e r y c l e a r l y,

may be taken as an indication that such amendment wouldn't come amiss
here either.

chris mcmillan

unread,
Oct 24, 2005, 2:54:22 PM10/24/05
to
In message <435be7db...@text.news.ntlworld.com>, Nick Odell
<gurzhfvp...@ntlworld.com> writes
>On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 19:37:14 GMT, chris mcmillan <spam...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
>
>>In message <435bbedb...@text.news.ntlworld.com>, Nick Odell
>><gurzhfvp...@ntlworld.com> writes
>>>On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 15:58:42 GMT, chris mcmillan
>>><spam...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>>....(wondering whether ntl will even post news items now)
>>>
>>>Oh good, it's not just me, then. Or rather, no it's not good for either
>>>of us :(
>>>The e-mail problem seems to have been going on for days.
>>>
>>48 hours so far for me, but Toodles has been muttering longer than that.
>>And earlier I couldn't even raise their home page - but at this actual
>>nanno-second all seems hunky dory. It *won't* last.
>>
>(Saying things
>are working when I know they are not;
>
'Xactly. But it seems better this evening. Touches wood with wrists as
I type.
>
> saying the pro

> I wonder if a nice man from ntl
>
In yer dreams.

Sincerely Chris


> is now going to pop into umra to
>say sorry for the outages etc?

--
Chris McMillan
http://www.chinavision.org.uk/

Penny

unread,
Oct 24, 2005, 3:36:38 PM10/24/05
to
On 24 Oct 2005 18:51:35 GMT, Robin Fairbairns a gribouillé dans la
poussière...

> Penny <sp...@labyrinth.freeuk.com> writes:
>>On 23 Oct 2005 19:35:49 GMT, Robin Fairbairns a gribouillé dans la
>>poussière...
>>
>>>i found we didn't have more
>>>than a couple of small bits of dried bay leaves,
>>
>>If you are down this way soon you are welcome to take a branch-full of bay
>>leaves back with you.
>
>coo, there's an offer and a half... and as it happens (what with my
>mother being laid up for so long[*]) i shall be in kent in a couple of
>weeks time (or maybe it's three -- we're doing w/ends in rotation).

Well, let me know. It's probably a good time of year for digging up baby
bays from around the base of the tree which I've been meaning to do anyway
so you may get a potted up treeling as well.

>i'ld like to see your place before you fly away, anyway.

You're too tall so a hard-hat might come in handy but it would be good to
have someone to show around since the agent hasn't found anyone who's
interested enough to come and have a look :(

>[*] she's getting better, and has just gone upstairs for the first
>time since the accident -- celebrating her new stair-lift. the silly
>think is, my sister and i were discussing the possibility of a
>stair-lift less than a week before mum fell; we were worried that she
>wouldn't accept the idea...

My mother's cousin on the south island had a stair lift put into her home
for her own aged mother about 20 years ago - she is now very pleased they
didn't take it out when the old girl died.

Nick Odell

unread,
Oct 28, 2005, 7:54:14 AM10/28/05
to
On 23 Oct 2005 19:35:49 GMT, r...@cl.cam.ac.uk (Robin Fairbairns) wrote:

> chris mcmillan <spam...@ntlworld.com> writes:
>>Linda Fox <lind...@ntlworld.com> writes
>>>He's being modest. He made a b***** marvellous pumpkin soup
>>
>>Come on then: hand it over. We all want to know.
>
>http://www.rivernene.co.uk/en/recipes/recipe.php?recipeid=171&catid=2 [*]
>
>as modified for half quantities in a half-aware fashion. i can't
>remember exactly what i did, except that i found we didn't have more
>than a couple of small bits of dried bay leaves, so i put rosemary in
>too.
>

Where did you get the inspiration for the peaches? They are not in the recipe
above (or is it that I just can't see for looking?). I'm going to have a go at
one of the aforemntioned Argentine pumpkin recipes this weekend. That has
peaches too so maybe it's just something everybody except me knows - like lamb
and apricots.

Nick O

Stephen

unread,
Oct 28, 2005, 7:09:13 PM10/28/05
to
According to the opalescent prose of Kim Andrews <som...@hotmail.com>
:

>On Mon, 24 Oct 2005 18:20:06 +0100, Andy Minter <an...@nildram.co.uk>
>wrote:
>
>>On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 18:20:09 +0100, "Siderius Nuncius"
>><matron....@tesco.net> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>"Linda Fox" <lind...@ntlworld.com> wrote
>>>
>>>> Wait a minute, I'll put me fingers down me
>>>> throat for you, shall I?
>>>
>>>Hang on a minute - don't we need to go into the woods first, so you can eat
>>>the bacon on a str...eh?
>>>
>>I'm delighted to find that I have completely forgotten what that
>>refers to.
>>Having a bad memory can be quite useful at times.
>
>I was distressed to find any details given at all, as I'd carefully
>avoided the original information, acting on umratic advice. Nugger!

You mean that somebody let the wolf out of the bag?

--
Stephen <http://wenlock.blogspot.com/>

Into my heart an air that kills from yon far country blows:
What are those blue remembered hills, what spires, what farms are those?
That is the land of lost content, I see it shining plain,
The happy highways where I went and cannot come again.

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