first time for horse meat

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congokid

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Oct 12, 2003, 7:14:20 AM10/12/03
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I had a couple of firsts last night when I went to friends' for dinner.

We began with cream of mushroom soup, made from cauliflower mushrooms
he'd foraged earlier this week.

Second course was marrow bone, roasted and served with toasted French
bread. I'd never had it before and liked it. It tasted like beef
flavoured fat.

Main course was rump of horse, which was served quite rare as a pave -
like a fillet steak, in a dark gravy with roast chipped spuds and roast
peppers.

The meat was denser and slightly tougher than good beef, with a faint
gamy flavour that I usually associate with venison.

It was the first time I've knowingly eaten horse meat, and I found it
difficult to stop thinking about what I was eating. I was mildly alarmed
at the amount of blood left on the plate, but my mind kept harking back
to 'Life of Pi' which I read recently (finished it in the same week that
Roy got mauled by his tiger and a tiger was found in a New York
apartment), and realised there was nothing to be squeamish about.

--
congokid
Eating out in London? Read my tips...
http://congokid.com

Mary Fisher

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Oct 12, 2003, 6:40:53 PM10/12/03
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"congokid" <cong...@congokid.com> wrote in message
news:DMU6OjOMeTi$Ew...@congokid.demon.co.uk...

> I had a couple of firsts last night when I went to friends' for dinner.
>
> We began with cream of mushroom soup, made from cauliflower mushrooms
> he'd foraged earlier this week.
>
> Second course was marrow bone, roasted and served with toasted French
> bread. I'd never had it before and liked it. It tasted like beef
> flavoured fat.

That's what it is, really. It was once given to children as a treat.
Nowadays you're not supposed to eat marrow (because of BSE) but it doesn't
stop me.


>
> Main course was rump of horse, which was served quite rare as a pave -
> like a fillet steak, in a dark gravy with roast chipped spuds and roast
> peppers.

Where did your friends buy it? I haven't been able to get horse meat for
decades. It was once our staple meat, on animal welfare grounds.


>
> The meat was denser and slightly tougher than good beef, with a faint
> gamy flavour that I usually associate with venison.

The tenderness depends on the age and cut of the meat, as with any animal.
I've never noticed any gaminess. It always passed as beef in our house, I
couldn't understand that because the fat was very yellow. It didn't look
like beef on that count.


>
> It was the first time I've knowingly eaten horse meat, and I found it
> difficult to stop thinking about what I was eating.

You didn't have a problem with it did you? If so, why?

> I was mildly alarmed
> at the amount of blood left on the plate,

As you do when eating beef?

Mary


Adrian Tupper

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Oct 13, 2003, 3:39:26 AM10/13/03
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"Mary Fisher" <mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> wrote in
news:3f89d89b$0$196$4c56...@master.news.zetnet.net:

>
> "congokid" <cong...@congokid.com> wrote in message
> news:DMU6OjOMeTi$Ew...@congokid.demon.co.uk...
>> I had a couple of firsts last night when I went to friends' for
>> dinner.
>>
>> We began with cream of mushroom soup, made from cauliflower mushrooms
>> he'd foraged earlier this week.
>>
>> Second course was marrow bone, roasted and served with toasted French
>> bread. I'd never had it before and liked it. It tasted like beef
>> flavoured fat.
>
> That's what it is, really. It was once given to children as a treat.
> Nowadays you're not supposed to eat marrow (because of BSE) but it
> doesn't stop me.

Never had it myself. Nor the mushrooms although they are reputedly
very tasty. Oh, and they aren't mushrooms but another sort of fungus!

>>
>> Main course was rump of horse, which was served quite rare as a pave
>> - like a fillet steak, in a dark gravy with roast chipped spuds and
>> roast peppers.
>
> Where did your friends buy it? I haven't been able to get horse meat
> for decades. It was once our staple meat, on animal welfare grounds.

You ate old pit ponies?

>>
>> The meat was denser and slightly tougher than good beef, with a faint
>> gamy flavour that I usually associate with venison.
>
> The tenderness depends on the age and cut of the meat, as with any
> animal. I've never noticed any gaminess. It always passed as beef in
> our house, I couldn't understand that because the fat was very yellow.
> It didn't look like beef on that count.
>>
>> It was the first time I've knowingly eaten horse meat, and I found it
>> difficult to stop thinking about what I was eating.
>
> You didn't have a problem with it did you? If so, why?
>

I think I would, although I admit it would be rather irrational. Some
animals kind of deserve better. I wouldn't fancy elephant or dolphin
for example.

>> I was mildly alarmed
>> at the amount of blood left on the plate,
>
> As you do when eating beef?

I assume it was not well-done. Actually I don't like the blood
either unless it has been turned into a gravy. Now I think of
it I don't eat an awful lot of red meat these days. However I
has a nice piece of lamb at a superb resto in Newtonmore last weekend...

--
Adrian

Ophelia

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Oct 13, 2003, 4:23:54 AM10/13/03
to

"Adrian Tupper" <adrian...@totalise.co.uk> wrote in message

>
> I assume it was not well-done. Actually I don't like the blood
> either unless it has been turned into a gravy. Now I think of
> it I don't eat an awful lot of red meat these days.

Nor do we

However I
> has a nice piece of lamb at a superb resto in Newtonmore last weekend...

Where did you eat? We used to have a flat in Aviemore:) Have you eaten at
Bruar?

O


Davemar

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Oct 13, 2003, 6:11:40 AM10/13/03
to
congokid <cong...@congokid.com> wrote in message news:<DMU6OjOMeTi$Ew...@congokid.demon.co.uk>...
> I had a couple of firsts last night when I went to friends' for dinner.
>
> We began with cream of mushroom soup, made from cauliflower mushrooms
> he'd foraged earlier this week.

What did it taste like?
Did they say where they found them? I had a pathetic attempt at mushroom
hunting this weekend, the weather's been too dry recently though for
anything much. Did see a couple of small clumps of mushrooms I couldn't
identify, so left them. Never did see any Penny Buns, cauliflower mushrooms
or truffles (OK, that last one wasn't serious!).

>
> Second course was marrow bone, roasted and served with toasted French
> bread. I'd never had it before and liked it. It tasted like beef
> flavoured fat.

Saw "Os a Moelle" (excuse my spelling) on a menu in Paris recently,
though I didn't have it. However I did buy a piece of marrow bone in
a Calais supermarket which I cooked up. Didn't seem to render much
marrowbone to be worthwhile unfortunately.


>
> Main course was rump of horse, which was served quite rare as a pave -
> like a fillet steak, in a dark gravy with roast chipped spuds and roast
> peppers.

On the same Calais supermarket trip I bought some horsemeat too!


>
> The meat was denser and slightly tougher than good beef, with a faint
> gamy flavour that I usually associate with venison.

I didn't really notice any gamy flavour really, but I suppose the toughness
is due to being less fatty than beef. Still a nice steak though.


>
> It was the first time I've knowingly eaten horse meat, and I found it
> difficult to stop thinking about what I was eating. I was mildly alarmed
> at the amount of blood left on the plate, but my mind kept harking back
> to 'Life of Pi' which I read recently (finished it in the same week that
> Roy got mauled by his tiger and a tiger was found in a New York
> apartment), and realised there was nothing to be squeamish about.

A horse is just a cow that hasn't eaten all the pies as far as I'm
concerned ;) We've only became attatched to horses more as they were
used for transport rather more than food. It's a shame we can't seem to
get it in this country these days, when its easier to find the non-indigenous
kangaroo meat even.

Adrian Tupper

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Oct 13, 2003, 7:14:25 AM10/13/03
to
"Ophelia" <Ophelia...@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in
news:bmdnim$kjnif$1...@ID-88328.news.uni-berlin.de:

I don't recall the exact name of the resto, something like "Regano's",
but it is integral to the Craigerne Hotel which is next to the golf
club house. The locals say it is the best place around and by chance
it was where we were staying at the time. Quite reasonable.

--
Adrian

Adrian Tupper

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Oct 13, 2003, 9:57:01 AM10/13/03
to
"Mary Fisher" <mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> wrote in
news:3f89d89b$0$196$4c56...@master.news.zetnet.net:

>> Main course was rump of horse, which was served quite rare as a pave
>> - like a fillet steak, in a dark gravy with roast chipped spuds and
>> roast peppers.
>
> Where did your friends buy it? I haven't been able to get horse meat
> for decades. It was once our staple meat, on animal welfare grounds.

...or was it your stable meat?
:-)

--
Adrian

Mary Fisher

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Oct 13, 2003, 1:16:03 PM10/13/03
to

> >
> > Where did your friends buy it? I haven't been able to get horse meat
> > for decades. It was once our staple meat, on animal welfare grounds.
>
> You ate old pit ponies?

No, they wre pensioned off in fields. The only horsemeat allowed for human
consumption was from racehorses.
>

> >>
> >> It was the first time I've knowingly eaten horse meat, and I found it
> >> difficult to stop thinking about what I was eating.
> >
> > You didn't have a problem with it did you? If so, why?
> >
>
> I think I would, although I admit it would be rather irrational. Some
> animals kind of deserve better. I wouldn't fancy elephant or dolphin
> for example.

I'll try owt. We had penguin in Iceland, it was lovely, very much like
pigeon.


>
> >> I was mildly alarmed
> >> at the amount of blood left on the plate,
> >
> > As you do when eating beef?
>
> I assume it was not well-done.

That's called 'rare' ...

> Actually I don't like the blood
> either unless it has been turned into a gravy. Now I think of
> it I don't eat an awful lot of red meat these days. However I
> has a nice piece of lamb at a superb resto in Newtonmore last weekend...

We went to a smashing restaurant in Wales. There was no lamb on the menu. I
couldn't believe it. I was informed that the menu is changed daily (I
believe it) and that next time we go, if we want lamb we should telephone in
advance and chef would put it on.

But lamb's so easy to do one's self when one's staying on daughter's farm
where she grows sheep ... I was just surprised that they weren't promoting
Welsh lamb.

Mary

>
> --
> Adrian


Mary Fisher

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Oct 13, 2003, 1:16:55 PM10/13/03
to

> >
> > Where did your friends buy it? I haven't been able to get horse meat
> > for decades. It was once our staple meat, on animal welfare grounds.
>
> ...or was it your stable meat?

OAYDMML!

Mary

> :-)
>
> --
> Adrian


Mary Fisher

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Oct 13, 2003, 1:20:01 PM10/13/03
to
>
> We've only became attatched to horses more as they were
> used for transport rather more than food.

Well, so were bovines ...

I suspect it's more to do with the so-called special relationship which
grows between horse and rider ...

> It's a shame we can't seem to
> get it in this country these days, when its easier to find the
non-indigenous
> kangaroo meat even.

Indeed. And ostrich. OK, I know ostrich is reared here now but it's still an
exotic.

But then, so was rabbit, once.

And most of the rabbit available nowadays is Chinese ...

In Germany I saw a whole freezer full of hare ...

Mary


congokid

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Oct 13, 2003, 2:18:32 PM10/13/03
to
In article <3f89d89b$0$196$4c56...@master.news.zetnet.net>, Mary Fisher
<mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> writes

>"congokid" <cong...@congokid.com> wrote in message
>news:DMU6OjOMeTi$Ew...@congokid.demon.co.uk...
>> Main course was rump of horse, which was served quite rare as a pave -

>Where did your friends buy it? I haven't been able to get horse meat for


>decades. It was once our staple meat, on animal welfare grounds.

I don't think I even asked! I presumed they got it in France - they'd
been to Montpelier the weekend before, but since they flew there and
back maybe they didn't buy it then. I wouldn't be surprised if it had
been lurking at the back of their freezer since their last car
expedition to Calais.

>> The meat was denser and slightly tougher than good beef, with a faint
>> gamy flavour that I usually associate with venison.
>
>The tenderness depends on the age and cut of the meat, as with any animal.
>I've never noticed any gaminess. It always passed as beef in our house, I
>couldn't understand that because the fat was very yellow. It didn't look
>like beef on that count.

Whatever fat this horse meat had must have been removed before cooking.
I didn't even know it was horse until he told me just before I tucked
in. Luckily the Argentine red wines I'd brought went very well with it!

>> It was the first time I've knowingly eaten horse meat, and I found it
>> difficult to stop thinking about what I was eating.
>You didn't have a problem with it did you? If so, why?

I imagine it was just the thought of eating something unfamiliar. The
first time I ate horse was when I tried some salami a colleague had
bought in Boulogne, years ago. We were returning on the ferry and half
way through the pack I noticed 'cheval' listed among the ingredients. On
that occasion I didn't know it was horse before I'd eaten it.

>> I was mildly alarmed
>> at the amount of blood left on the plate,
>As you do when eating beef?

Rare beef doesn't bother me anymore, but I have a feeling it probably
did the first time I ate it. Not enough to make me stop eating it,
obviously. Raw beef doesn't appeal, though. Perhaps the horse meat was
rarer than I'd have liked. I still finished it, but not sure if I'd
order it from a menu if I had a choice.

congokid

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Oct 13, 2003, 2:19:02 PM10/13/03
to
In article <638a08f1.03101...@posting.google.com>, Davemar
<dave...@mailandnews.com> writes

>congokid <cong...@congokid.com> wrote in message
>news:<DMU6OjOMeTi$Ew...@congokid.demon.co.uk>...

>> We began with cream of mushroom soup, made from cauliflower mushrooms


>> he'd foraged earlier this week.
>
>What did it taste like?

Not much different from normal mushroom, perhaps a bit slimy in texture
(but not as slimy as the mushroom soup he made for dinner a few years
ago - that was exceedingly slimy and I almost gagged finishing it. There
might have been a dodgy one in it, too, as the next day we all reported
very bad nightmares. His wife thought he'd poisoned us).

>Did they say where they found them?

Don't know, but I can check. I did and enjoyed mycology as part of my
degree, but it was all about growing things in petri dishes and
identifying spores and mycelia. I missed out on the 'fungal forays' my
lecturer organised.

>Saw "Os a Moelle" (excuse my spelling) on a menu in Paris recently,
>though I didn't have it. However I did buy a piece of marrow bone in
>a Calais supermarket which I cooked up. Didn't seem to render much
>marrowbone to be worthwhile unfortunately.

I had four large sections of bone which contained enough marrow to
spread over several slices of toast.

Mary Fisher

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Oct 13, 2003, 4:07:52 PM10/13/03
to
>
> Whatever fat this horse meat had must have been removed before cooking.
> I didn't even know it was horse until he told me just before I tucked
> in. Luckily the Argentine red wines I'd brought went very well with it!

It might well do!


>
> >> It was the first time I've knowingly eaten horse meat, and I found it
> >> difficult to stop thinking about what I was eating.

> >You didn't have a problem with it did you? If so, why?
>
> I imagine it was just the thought of eating something unfamiliar.

Hmm. Isn't there any other meat - or vegetable - which you've never had but
isn't unfamiliar in our culture?

My husband, for instance, won't eat eels. Not because he doesn't like them,
he's never had them. He just doesn't fancy them. It's irrational. It took me
some time to persuade him to try oyster mushrooms and chard, for the same
reason.

I remember a poster I once saw: I've never drunk Guinness becasue I don't
like it.

> The
> first time I ate horse was when I tried some salami a colleague had
> bought in Boulogne, years ago. We were returning on the ferry and half
> way through the pack I noticed 'cheval' listed among the ingredients. On
> that occasion I didn't know it was horse before I'd eaten it.

Well done!


>
> >> I was mildly alarmed
> >> at the amount of blood left on the plate,

> >As you do when eating beef?
>
> Rare beef doesn't bother me anymore, but I have a feeling it probably
> did the first time I ate it. Not enough to make me stop eating it,
> obviously. Raw beef doesn't appeal, though.

Nor to me ...

> Perhaps the horse meat was
> rarer than I'd have liked. I still finished it, but not sure if I'd
> order it from a menu if I had a choice.

I wouldn't - because I would trust most restaurants. Not the ones I can
afford anyway.

But if I saw it on sale I'd be first in the queue. It's excellent. And it
used to be incredibly cheap because no-one bought it to eat, only for their
pets. Our children were raised on it.

Even Spouse grew to like it and be enthusiastic!

Mary

congokid

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Oct 13, 2003, 5:46:22 PM10/13/03
to
In article <3f8b063f$0$194$4c56...@master.news.zetnet.net>, Mary Fisher
<mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> writes

>> I imagine it was just the thought of eating something unfamiliar.


>Hmm. Isn't there any other meat - or vegetable - which you've never had but
>isn't unfamiliar in our culture?

Beetroot - I have eaten it but will avoid if given the chance. Okra -
can't abide the slimy texture. In the past, porridge, which my mum made
every night. Even the thought of it used to make me gag, but in recent
years I've re-acquired a taste for it, so there's hope for everything
else I think I don't like.

>My husband, for instance, won't eat eels. Not because he doesn't like them,
>he's never had them. He just doesn't fancy them. It's irrational. It took me
>some time to persuade him to try oyster mushrooms and chard, for the same
>reason.

I don't think I've ever had eel, and yet the lake in front of my house
in Congo was leaping with them. It's considered a delicacy in some N
Ireland circles. My friend swears by them (she's from the banks of Lough
Neagh). I even avoided ordering the eel dish in Aaura, Chinatown a few
weeks back, but I'd probably like them if they were put in front of me.
After all, I managed to develop a taste for fish lips and hens' feet in
Chinese restaurants.

I do remember not wanting to try mushrooms as a kid, but liked them once
I did. It seems to be a kid thing, avoiding certain kinds of food. And
not liking them into adulthood must be a type of arrested development.

>I remember a poster I once saw: I've never drunk Guinness becasue I don't
>like it.

Now, that I do like. Lots of it. Especially with oysters.

Adrian Tupper

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Oct 13, 2003, 5:59:58 PM10/13/03
to
"Mary Fisher" <mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> wrote in
news:3f8addfb$0$196$4c56...@master.news.zetnet.net:

>
>
>> >
>> > Where did your friends buy it? I haven't been able to get horse
>> > meat for decades. It was once our staple meat, on animal welfare
>> > grounds.
>>
>> You ate old pit ponies?
>
> No, they wre pensioned off in fields. The only horsemeat allowed for
> human consumption was from racehorses.


I wonder how much a Red Rum steak would have cost?

>>
>
>> >>
>> >> It was the first time I've knowingly eaten horse meat, and I found
>> >> it difficult to stop thinking about what I was eating.
>> >
>> > You didn't have a problem with it did you? If so, why?
>> >
>>
>> I think I would, although I admit it would be rather irrational.
>> Some animals kind of deserve better. I wouldn't fancy elephant or
>> dolphin for example.
>
> I'll try owt. We had penguin in Iceland, it was lovely, very much like
> pigeon.

Why in Iceland? I mean, they're from the southern hemisphere.

>>
>> >> I was mildly alarmed
>> >> at the amount of blood left on the plate,
>> >
>> > As you do when eating beef?
>>
>> I assume it was not well-done.
>
> That's called 'rare' ...

Or it could have been medium.

>
>> Actually I don't like the blood
>> either unless it has been turned into a gravy. Now I think of
>> it I don't eat an awful lot of red meat these days. However I
>> has a nice piece of lamb at a superb resto in Newtonmore last
>> weekend...
>
> We went to a smashing restaurant in Wales. There was no lamb on the
> menu. I couldn't believe it. I was informed that the menu is changed
> daily (I believe it) and that next time we go, if we want lamb we
> should telephone in advance and chef would put it on.
>
> But lamb's so easy to do one's self when one's staying on daughter's
> farm where she grows sheep ... I was just surprised that they weren't
> promoting Welsh lamb.

I know. There's so much lamb on the hills and it doesn't often appear
on menus. Shame.

--
Adrian

Mary Fisher

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Oct 13, 2003, 6:03:23 PM10/13/03
to

> >
> > The only horsemeat allowed for
> > human consumption was from racehorses.
>
>
> I wonder how much a Red Rum steak would have cost?

No idea. But Sherga (sp?) was delicious.
>
> >>
> >
> >> >>

> > I'll try owt. We had penguin in Iceland, it was lovely, very much like
> > pigeon.
>
> Why in Iceland? I mean, they're from the southern hemisphere.

There are at least two kinds of penguin, Adrian, one lives in the south and
one in the north ...


>
> >>
> >> >> I was mildly alarmed
> >> >> at the amount of blood left on the plate,
> >> >
> >> > As you do when eating beef?
> >>
> >> I assume it was not well-done.
> >
> > That's called 'rare' ...
>
> Or it could have been medium.

If so she'd have known what to expect ...


>
> >
> > I was just surprised that they weren't
> > promoting Welsh lamb.
>
> I know. There's so much lamb on the hills and it doesn't often appear
> on menus. Shame.
>

That was my point.

Mary
> --
> Adrian


Adrian Tupper

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Oct 13, 2003, 6:04:17 PM10/13/03
to
"Mary Fisher" <mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> wrote in
news:3f8adee9$0$188$4c56...@master.news.zetnet.net:

>>
>> We've only became attatched to horses more as they were
>> used for transport rather more than food.
>
> Well, so were bovines ...
>
> I suspect it's more to do with the so-called special relationship
> which grows between horse and rider ...
>
>> It's a shame we can't seem to
>> get it in this country these days, when its easier to find the
> non-indigenous
>> kangaroo meat even.
>
> Indeed. And ostrich. OK, I know ostrich is reared here now but it's
> still an exotic.
>

All of our domesticated animals were imported. Weren't they? Pigs and
hens from Asia. Cattle from the continent. Where did sheep come from?


> But then, so was rabbit, once.

Brought in by the Normans, IIRC. Didn't they also bring that other
pest across, the pigeon?

>
> And most of the rabbit available nowadays is Chinese ...

Really? And there's zillions of 'em in the fields.

>
> In Germany I saw a whole freezer full of hare ...

I often see hares in the mountains. These at least must be indigenous.

--
Adrian

Mary Fisher

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Oct 13, 2003, 6:21:58 PM10/13/03
to

"Adrian Tupper" <adrian...@totalise.co.uk> wrote in message
news:Xns9413E...@194.247.47.119...

> "Mary Fisher" <mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> wrote in
> news:3f8adee9$0$188$4c56...@master.news.zetnet.net:
>
> >>
> >> We've only became attatched to horses more as they were
> >> used for transport rather more than food.
> >
> > Well, so were bovines ...
> >
> > I suspect it's more to do with the so-called special relationship
> > which grows between horse and rider ...
> >
> >> It's a shame we can't seem to
> >> get it in this country these days, when its easier to find the
> > non-indigenous
> >> kangaroo meat even.
> >
> > Indeed. And ostrich. OK, I know ostrich is reared here now but it's
> > still an exotic.
> >
>
> All of our domesticated animals were imported. Weren't they? Pigs and
> hens from Asia. Cattle from the continent.

Where did you get that information?


> Where did sheep come from?

I've no idea. But they were here when the Romans brought in white ones.


>
>
> > But then, so was rabbit, once.
>
> Brought in by the Normans, IIRC.

Yes, I believe that too. But Spouse says it ws the Romans. I think he's
wrong.

> Didn't they also bring that other
> pest across, the pigeon?

I reckon that pigeon could make its own way. And anyway, it's delicious.


>
> >
> > And most of the rabbit available nowadays is Chinese ...
>
> Really? And there's zillions of 'em in the fields.

Myxi.


>
> >
> > In Germany I saw a whole freezer full of hare ...
>
> I often see hares in the mountains. These at least must be indigenous.

Yes, but the Argentinian ones are bred, I believe. They're the ones in the
German freezers.

Mary
>
> --
> Adrian


Robert Goodrick

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Oct 13, 2003, 10:41:14 PM10/13/03
to

Adrian Tupper wrote:

> Cattle from the continent.

I think that you might find that England had/has the oldest cattle.
Longhorn - white.

> Where did sheep come from?

Ewe's as far as I know. :o))

R

Dave Fawthrop

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Oct 14, 2003, 2:35:39 AM10/14/03
to
On Tue, 14 Oct 2003 02:41:14 GMT, Robert Goodrick <rgoo...@shaw.ca>
wrote:

|
|
| Adrian Tupper wrote:
|
| > Cattle from the continent.
|
| I think that you might find that England had/has the oldest cattle.
| Longhorn - white.

Further back the Oroch, common over Europe. an extinct bovine much the same
size as an African Buffalo, a dangerous Animal. When I was in an African
Game Park, the Ascari (minders) would drive close to most animals, but said
"That is a Buffalo over there (100 yards), now drive the other way".

Within a few thousand years of domestication they were selectively bred to
the size of a Dexter a very small cow.

Other parts of the world domesticated other bovines such as the Yak

| > Where did sheep come from?

Middle East IIRC

Dave F


Sigvaldi Eggertsson

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Oct 14, 2003, 5:21:10 AM10/14/03
to
"Mary Fisher" <mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> wrote in message news:<3f8b2150$0$195$4c56...@master.news.zetnet.net>...

> > > I'll try owt. We had penguin in Iceland, it was lovely, very much like
> > > pigeon.
> >
> > Why in Iceland? I mean, they're from the southern hemisphere.
>
> There are at least two kinds of penguin, Adrian, one lives in the south and
> one in the north ...

Are you possibly referring to the Puffin?
There are no Penguins living wild outside the southern hemisphere.

Peter H.M. Brooks

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 5:33:01 AM10/14/03
to

"Dave Fawthrop" <hyp...@hyphenologist.co.uk> wrote in message
news:mn5nov81c9kh9j9fm...@4ax.com...

> On Tue, 14 Oct 2003 02:41:14 GMT, Robert Goodrick <rgoo...@shaw.ca>
> wrote:
>
> |
> |
> | Adrian Tupper wrote:
> |
> | > Cattle from the continent.
> |
> | I think that you might find that England had/has the oldest cattle.
> | Longhorn - white.
>
> Further back the Oroch, common over Europe. an extinct bovine much the
same
> size as an African Buffalo, a dangerous Animal. When I was in an African
> Game Park, the Ascari (minders) would drive close to most animals, but
said
> "That is a Buffalo over there (100 yards), now drive the other way".
>
> Within a few thousand years of domestication they were selectively bred to
> the size of a Dexter a very small cow.
>
The aurocks (Bos Urus or Bos primigenius) existed in Europe until fairly
recently - Caesar called them Urus and Charlemagne hunted them. The
Lithuanian Zubr (Bos Bison) is sometimes, incorrectly, called an aurock.
African Buffalos are not to be confused with Gnus, or Blue Wildebeest.

In the subject of Africa, there is a lot of wonderful venison to be had
here, Kudu, Springbok, Impala, and many more, but one of the very nicest is
Warthog, it is similar to Sanglier, or the European Wild Boar (paradoxically
Sanglier is farmed just outside Bristol, and can be found at the best
butchers there), but much more succulent and gamy. Sadly, though,
magnificent as Warthog undoubtedly is, it isn't quite as superb as fillet of
hare, a dish that I have had produced to perfection in Strasbourg.


--
'Damon, what's a wanker?' 'These days a waster, a shirker, someone who's
fixed himself a soft job or an exalted position by means of an undeserved
reputation on which he now coasts.' 'Oh. Nothing to do with tossing off
then?' 'Well, connected with it, yes, but more metaphorical than literal.' -
K. Amis "Jake's Thing" 1978

Malcolm Loades

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 5:47:28 AM10/14/03
to
In message <3f8addfb$0$196$4c56...@master.news.zetnet.net>, Mary Fisher
<mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> writes

>I'll try owt. We had penguin in Iceland, it was lovely, very much like
>pigeon.

Would that have been Iceland in Leeds? My local Iceland doesn't do
penguin ;-)
--
Malcolm


Dave Fawthrop

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 6:48:48 AM10/14/03
to
On Tue, 14 Oct 2003 11:33:01 +0200, "Peter H.M. Brooks" <pe...@new.co.za>
wrote:


| African Buffalos are not to be confused with Gnus, or Blue Wildebeest.

Can *anyone* confuse an African Buffalo and a Gnu/Wildebeast?
One is bovine and the other a deer, totally different shape.

Dave F

Peter H.M. Brooks

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 7:14:33 AM10/14/03
to

"Dave Fawthrop" <hyp...@hyphenologist.co.uk> wrote in message
news:ctknov0b8440leu20...@4ax.com...
They have very similar horns, though the Wildebeest are certainly more
gracile, they are very different from most antelope (you don't have deer in
Africa) You might be interested in the definition of 'gnu' in the OED: "A
South African quadruped (Catoblepas gnu), belinging to the antelope family,
but resembling an ox of buffalo in shape; also known by its Duth name
wildebeest." So, as you see, it is quite easy to confuse with a buffalo!


--
"Wherever tyranny has ruled, it has been with this insidious claim that the
status quo must not be questioned," - Bantu Holomisa

Phil C.

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 7:36:25 AM10/14/03
to
On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 23:21:58 +0100, "Mary Fisher"
<mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> wrote:

>> > But then, so was rabbit, once.
>>
>> Brought in by the Normans, IIRC.
>
>Yes, I believe that too. But Spouse says it ws the Romans. I think he's
>wrong.

I'm sure you're right - it was the Normans. It was a Mediterranean
creature and for a long time was rather delicate. Special warrens had
to be constructed, protected by law - it's ability to dig seems to
have been limited. Evolution has served the rabbit well - too damn
well.

The Normans also brought pheasants. (There is one reference to
pheasant at a pre-Norman Conquest feast but this seems to have been
written later.) They've remained relatively delicate - perhaps because
shooting tends to kill the strongest rather than the weakest.

>> > In Germany I saw a whole freezer full of hare ...
>>
>> I often see hares in the mountains. These at least must be indigenous.
>
>Yes, but the Argentinian ones are bred, I believe. They're the ones in the
>German freezers.

I wonder if the aversion to eating wild hare in Britain is because
it's seen as endangered. It certainly isn't endangered in eastern
England which has evidently become its stronghold. AFAIK, nobody
really understands why this should be. Sometimes when I mow the grass
I have to watch out for leverets which the mothers have left to
collect later. OTOH, I suppose it would become endangered if its meat
became too popular.
--
Phil C.

Mary Fisher

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 1:10:25 PM10/14/03
to

> > > > I'll try owt. We had penguin in Iceland, it was lovely, very much
like
> > > > pigeon.
> > >
> > > Why in Iceland? I mean, they're from the southern hemisphere.
> >
> > There are at least two kinds of penguin, Adrian, one lives in the south
and
> > one in the north ...
>
> Are you possibly referring to the Puffin?

EEEEEEEk!

<slaps head>

Yes, I was.

How did that happen?

Mea culpa.

Make the most of it ...

Mary

Mary Fisher

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 1:10:48 PM10/14/03
to


"Malcolm Loades" <news-...@justmay.be> wrote in message
news:Ao0ANJRwY8i$Ew...@loades.net...

No idea, we don't shop there.

Mary
> --
> Malcolm
>
>


Mary Fisher

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 1:12:30 PM10/14/03
to

>
> >> > But then, so was rabbit, once.
> >>
> >> Brought in by the Normans, IIRC.
> >
> >Yes, I believe that too. But Spouse says it ws the Romans. I think he's
> >wrong.
>
> I'm sure you're right - it was the Normans. It was a Mediterranean
> creature and for a long time was rather delicate. Special warrens had
> to be constructed, protected by law - it's ability to dig seems to
> have been limited. Evolution has served the rabbit well - too damn
> well.

And many Normans bore the name Warrenne. I'm sure it's not a co-incidence.


>
>
> >> > In Germany I saw a whole freezer full of hare ...
> >>
> >> I often see hares in the mountains. These at least must be indigenous.
> >
> >Yes, but the Argentinian ones are bred, I believe. They're the ones in
the
> >German freezers.
>
> I wonder if the aversion to eating wild hare in Britain is because
> it's seen as endangered. It certainly isn't endangered in eastern
> England which has evidently become its stronghold. AFAIK, nobody
> really understands why this should be. Sometimes when I mow the grass
> I have to watch out for leverets which the mothers have left to
> collect later. OTOH, I suppose it would become endangered if its meat
> became too popular.

I bought one (a Yorkshire adult) this morning, I'm looking forward to it.

Mary
> --
> Phil C.


Mary Fisher

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 1:15:31 PM10/14/03
to

> > |
> > | I think that you might find that England had/has the oldest cattle.
> > | Longhorn - white.

No, it's the Chillingham, still some wild in a private park in
Northumberland. They're not domesticated and not eaten. The White Park is
old but not as old as that. The Longhorn isn't either.

Mary
> >


Peter H.M. Brooks

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 1:22:34 PM10/14/03
to

"Mary Fisher" <mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> wrote in message
news:3f8c2ea7$0$194$4c56...@master.news.zetnet.net...
>

> >
> > I wonder if the aversion to eating wild hare in Britain is because
> > it's seen as endangered. It certainly isn't endangered in eastern
> > England which has evidently become its stronghold. AFAIK, nobody
> > really understands why this should be. Sometimes when I mow the grass
> > I have to watch out for leverets which the mothers have left to
> > collect later. OTOH, I suppose it would become endangered if its meat
> > became too popular.
>
> I bought one (a Yorkshire adult) this morning, I'm looking forward to it.
>

I'd recommend jugging most of it, but keeping the fillets and, as a separate
dish, grilling them lightly and having with a tart berry sauce and a sauce
from the residue of the grill pan thinned with madiera.


--
'They.. sucked the Tobacco smoak in greedily, swallow it down with the
Water. For which reason..generally at..the first Pipe in the Morning, they
fall down drunk and insensible.' - 1698 A. Brand 'Embark Muscovy to China'


Larry Autry

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 2:04:05 PM10/14/03
to
"Mary Fisher"
>> I wonder if the aversion to eating wild hare in Britain is because
>> it's seen as endangered. It certainly isn't endangered in eastern
>> England which has evidently become its stronghold. AFAIK, nobody
>> really understands why this should be. Sometimes when I mow the grass
>> I have to watch out for leverets which the mothers have left to
>> collect later. OTOH, I suppose it would become endangered if its meat
>> became too popular.
You can have all you want of ours. Coyote have moved east (don't know if
they crossed the Mississippi). You can have those, too.


--
Larry Autry
Manchester, MO USA
aut...@urthlink.nnett
If you can spell Earth and net, you can email me.

Adrian Tupper

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 3:29:05 PM10/14/03
to
"Mary Fisher" <mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> wrote in
news:3f8c2e41$0$190$4c56...@master.news.zetnet.net:

So did you eat a puffin then?

--
Adrian

Adrian Tupper

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 3:32:45 PM10/14/03
to
Robert Goodrick <rgoo...@shaw.ca> wrote in
news:3F8B6230...@shaw.ca:

>
>
> Adrian Tupper wrote:
>
>> Cattle from the continent.
>
> I think that you might find that England had/has the oldest cattle.
> Longhorn - white.

Maybe so. But Fresians and Limousins etc were not wandering the fells
in the days of Fred Flintstone. Anyway, where did the Longhorn come
from?

--
Adrian

Mary Fisher

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 3:42:18 PM10/14/03
to

> >> There are no Penguins living wild outside the southern hemisphere.
> >
> >
> >
>
> So did you eat a puffin then?

Only the breast.

In a raspberry coulis ...

Mary


>
> --
> Adrian


Mary Fisher

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 3:43:10 PM10/14/03
to

<hare>


> >
> > I bought one (a Yorkshire adult) this morning, I'm looking forward to
it.
> >
> I'd recommend jugging most of it, but keeping the fillets and, as a
separate
> dish, grilling them lightly and having with a tart berry sauce and a sauce
> from the residue of the grill pan thinned with madiera.

Thanks, that sound OK. But I have cooked hare before, lots of times ...
that's why I'm looking forward to it.

Mary

Mary Fisher

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 3:43:43 PM10/14/03
to

> >
> >
> > Adrian Tupper wrote:
> >
> >> Cattle from the continent.
> >
> > I think that you might find that England had/has the oldest cattle.
> > Longhorn - white.
>
> Maybe so. But Fresians and Limousins etc were not wandering the fells
> in the days of Fred Flintstone. Anyway, where did the Longhorn come
> from?

Cattle head.

Mary
>
> --
> Adrian


Peter H.M. Brooks

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 3:48:01 PM10/14/03
to

"Mary Fisher" <mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> wrote in message
news:3f8c51f6$0$189$4c56...@master.news.zetnet.net...

>
>
> <hare>
> > >
> > > I bought one (a Yorkshire adult) this morning, I'm looking forward to
> it.
> > >
> > I'd recommend jugging most of it, but keeping the fillets and, as a
> separate
> > dish, grilling them lightly and having with a tart berry sauce and a
sauce
> > from the residue of the grill pan thinned with madiera.
>
> Thanks, that sound OK. But I have cooked hare before, lots of times ...
> that's why I'm looking forward to it.
>
I wasn't suggesting otherwise! I simply feel that, if you jug the fillets
you are wasting the very best part, that's all!


--
Even our prostitutes have degrees - Fidel Castro

Dave Fawthrop

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 3:52:40 PM10/14/03
to
On 14 Oct 2003 19:32:45 GMT, Adrian Tupper <adrian...@totalise.co.uk>
wrote:

Aurochs, which had IIRC long curved horns

Dave F

Adrian Tupper

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Oct 14, 2003, 6:20:35 PM10/14/03
to
"Mary Fisher" <mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> wrote in news:3f8c51c1$0$197
$4c56...@master.news.zetnet.net:

>
>
>> >> There are no Penguins living wild outside the southern hemisphere.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>> So did you eat a puffin then?
>
> Only the breast.
>
> In a raspberry coulis ...
>

...and now you are going to tell me that the raspberries were
Icelandic too?

--
Adrian

S Viemeister

unread,
Oct 14, 2003, 6:50:07 PM10/14/03
to
Larry Autry wrote:

> You can have all you want of ours. Coyote have moved east (don't know if
> they crossed the Mississippi). You can have those, too.
>

WAY past the Mississippi - They've been found in New York City!

Sheila

Arri London

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Oct 14, 2003, 8:41:05 PM10/14/03
to

Given all the other fruits and vegs grown under glass in Iceland (heated
by geothermal energy of course), it wouldn't surprise me one bit. One
glasshouse complex I visited outside Reykjavik had banana and coffee
trees growing quite happily.

Sigvaldi Eggertsson

unread,
Oct 15, 2003, 5:24:27 AM10/15/03
to
Arri London <bio...@ic.ac.uk> wrote in message news:<3F8C97A1...@ic.ac.uk>...

Bad coffe though...

Phil C.

unread,
Oct 15, 2003, 8:26:14 AM10/15/03
to
On Tue, 14 Oct 2003 18:12:30 +0100, "Mary Fisher"
<mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> wrote:

>
>
>>
>> >> > But then, so was rabbit, once.
>> >>
>> >> Brought in by the Normans, IIRC.
>> >
>> >Yes, I believe that too. But Spouse says it ws the Romans. I think he's
>> >wrong.
>>
>> I'm sure you're right - it was the Normans. It was a Mediterranean
>> creature and for a long time was rather delicate. Special warrens had
>> to be constructed, protected by law - it's ability to dig seems to
>> have been limited. Evolution has served the rabbit well - too damn
>> well.
>
>And many Normans bore the name Warrenne. I'm sure it's not a co-incidence.

Pedants' corner. According to Basil Cottle's Dictionary of Surnames,
the surname of the great Norman family was from La Varenne, Maine et
Loire. However, this place name meant "sandy soil, wasteland, game
preserve" so that may provide the connection. Warren originally meant
any place enclosed for the breeding of game. It's etymologically
linked to warrant and guarantee.

Not totally off topic - I did mention Basil.
--
Phil C.

Larry Autry

unread,
Oct 15, 2003, 9:41:04 AM10/15/03
to
That's a howl!

S Viemeister

unread,
Oct 15, 2003, 10:01:26 AM10/15/03
to
Larry Autry wrote:
>
> S Viemeister wrote:
> > Larry Autry wrote:
> >
> >> You can have all you want of ours. Coyote have moved east (don't know if
> >> they crossed the Mississippi). You can have those, too.
> >>
> > WAY past the Mississippi - They've been found in New York City!
> >
> > Sheila
> That's a howl!
>
Yes - I believe that's what made them so noticeable!
Seriously, though - I wonder how did they get onto the island? You'd think
they'd be noticed going past the tollbooths.

Sheila

graham

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Oct 15, 2003, 11:43:43 AM10/15/03
to

"Phil C." <nob...@nowhere.com> wrote in message
news:7ncqov0j7vmmaa47o...@4ax.com...

Faulty logic, I think

Graham


Mary Fisher

unread,
Oct 15, 2003, 1:14:28 PM10/15/03
to

> >>
> >> So did you eat a puffin then?
> >
> > Only the breast.
> >
> > In a raspberry coulis ...
> >
>
> ...and now you are going to tell me that the raspberries were
> Icelandic too?

Why not? They do have a summer - as does Scotland :-)

And before anyone says that they grow bananas etc they're only for show, to
demonstrate the heating power of thermal doo dah.

Mostly their crops are fish, potatoes, cows and horses. But of course
raspberries are grown!

Mary
>
> --
> Adrian


VivienB

unread,
Oct 15, 2003, 3:19:03 PM10/15/03
to
On Wed, 15 Oct 2003 18:14:28 +0100, "Mary Fisher"
<mary.b...@zetnet.co.uk> wrote:

>
>Why not? They do have a summer - as does Scotland :-)
>
>And before anyone says that they grow bananas etc they're only for show, to
>demonstrate the heating power of thermal doo dah.
>
>Mostly their crops are fish, potatoes, cows and horses. But of course
>raspberries are grown!
>
>Mary
>>

Don't forget the sheep!

Regards, VivienB

Mary Fisher

unread,
Oct 15, 2003, 3:24:44 PM10/15/03
to


"VivienB" <cot...@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:u86rov8lvt2vmjoof...@4ax.com...

And sheep.

They're delicious, whether head, chops or anything!

Mary
>
> Regards, VivienB


Arri London

unread,
Oct 15, 2003, 8:16:37 PM10/15/03
to

LOL! That takes time to find the right cultivar! You should try American
coffee some time.....

Arri London

unread,
Oct 15, 2003, 8:18:24 PM10/15/03
to
Mary Fisher wrote:
>
> > >>
> > >> So did you eat a puffin then?
> > >
> > > Only the breast.
> > >
> > > In a raspberry coulis ...
> > >
> >
> > ...and now you are going to tell me that the raspberries were
> > Icelandic too?
>
> Why not? They do have a summer - as does Scotland :-)
>
> And before anyone says that they grow bananas etc they're only for show, to
> demonstrate the heating power of thermal doo dah.

They aren't only for show. It is part of a programme to see just what
can be grown in those glasshouses. Have you seen the price of bananas in
Iceland?

>
> Mostly their crops are fish, potatoes, cows and horses. But of course
> raspberries are grown!
>
> Mary

You forgot the lamb! Absolutely the best I've ever eaten anywhere! Other
root crops too, don't forget.
Icelandic food is great!

Adrian Tupper

unread,
Oct 16, 2003, 2:29:13 PM10/16/03
to
Arri London <bio...@ic.ac.uk> wrote in news:3F8DE3D0...@ic.ac.uk:

Great. I'll order all my food from Iceland from now on.

--
Adrian

ReidŠ

unread,
Oct 20, 2003, 5:14:26 AM10/20/03
to
Following up to Adrian Tupper

>>> Mostly their crops are fish, potatoes, cows and horses. But of course
>>> raspberries are grown!

>> You forgot the lamb! Absolutely the best I've ever eaten anywhere!
>> Other root crops too, don't forget.
>> Icelandic food is great!
>>
>
>Great. I'll order all my food from Iceland from now on.

Do they grow beef? I remember some lamb and lots of fish. Beef
was expensive (I assumed imported)
I'm sure someone told me the soil was too cold to grow root
crops, was that untrue?
--
Mike Reid
"Art is the lie that reveals the truth" P.Picasso
UK walking "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Spain,cuisines and walking "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap

ReidŠ

unread,
Oct 20, 2003, 5:14:27 AM10/20/03
to
Following up to Adrian Tupper

>All of our domesticated animals were imported. Weren't they? Pigs and
>hens from Asia. Cattle from the continent. Where did sheep come from?

The norse brought our upland sheep, the herdwick with them. Fell
is from a norse word, heft probably too?

Wild sheep are thought to have developed in Central asia 20
million years ago acording to my boys book of sheep. The Romans
brought Merino style types to UK but the Soay was already here,
developed from wild northern european stock. Crosses between the
two and presumably others like Scottish wild breeds developed our
modern Romano-British breeds.

BTW If you climb Scafell Pike with a shepherd you need two
things, the ability to tell a swaledale from a herdwicke and a
good pair of legs :-) <puff!> I thought I had been up it quite a
lot, he reckons 400+!

Sigvaldi Eggertsson

unread,
Oct 20, 2003, 10:37:51 AM10/20/03
to
Reid? <don...@fell-walker.co.uk> wrote in message news:<q667pvo6nk259i9q2...@4ax.com>...

> Following up to Adrian Tupper
>
> >>> Mostly their crops are fish, potatoes, cows and horses. But of course
> >>> raspberries are grown!
>
> >> You forgot the lamb! Absolutely the best I've ever eaten anywhere!
> >> Other root crops too, don't forget.
> >> Icelandic food is great!
> >>
> >
> >Great. I'll order all my food from Iceland from now on.
>
> Do they grow beef? I remember some lamb and lots of fish. Beef
> was expensive (I assumed imported)

No meat and almost no dairy products are imported. Beef, pork and
chicken are a
larger part of the total consumption than fish and lamb (and less
expensive)

> I'm sure someone told me the soil was too cold to grow root
> crops, was that untrue?

Yes, it was.
Iceland´s climate is a slightly colder variant of the British climate
(current temps: London 10°C, Reykjavík 7°C) and the temperature of the
soil is not a factor here in the south.

Adrian Tupper

unread,
Oct 20, 2003, 4:51:24 PM10/20/03
to
ReidŠ <don...@fell-walker.co.uk> wrote in
news:8o77pvchth1n45jbd...@4ax.com:

> Following up to Adrian Tupper
>
>>All of our domesticated animals were imported. Weren't they? Pigs
and
>>hens from Asia. Cattle from the continent. Where did sheep come
from?
>
> The norse brought our upland sheep, the herdwick with them. Fell
> is from a norse word, heft probably too?
>
> Wild sheep are thought to have developed in Central asia 20
> million years ago acording to my boys book of sheep. The Romans
> brought Merino style types to UK but the Soay was already here,
> developed from wild northern european stock. Crosses between the
> two and presumably others like Scottish wild breeds developed our
> modern Romano-British breeds.
>
> BTW If you climb Scafell Pike with a shepherd you need two
> things, the ability to tell a swaledale from a herdwicke and a
> good pair of legs :-) <puff!> I thought I had been up it quite a
> lot, he reckons 400+!

So my 4 times (I think) is not material. I doubt if a shepherd
would go to the summit though.

--
Adrian

ReidŠ

unread,
Oct 21, 2003, 6:19:20 AM10/21/03
to
Following up to Adrian Tupper

>> BTW If you climb Scafell Pike with a shepherd you need two


>> things, the ability to tell a swaledale from a herdwicke and a
>> good pair of legs :-) <puff!> I thought I had been up it quite a
>> lot, he reckons 400+!
>
>So my 4 times (I think) is not material. I doubt if a shepherd
>would go to the summit though.

His normal route was up Mickledor and along the summit ridge,
pushing the sheep down into Hollow stones. He of course would not
go and stand by the summit cairn but I have always seen that as
rather a bogus activity. (I reckon i'm on about 35-40).
I reckon a hillwalking shepherd is quite a rarity, though a
relative was a fellrunner, equally a busmans holiday.

food ob: Mars bars

Judith Umbria

unread,
Oct 21, 2003, 2:39:32 PM10/21/03
to

"ReidŠ" <don...@fell-walker.co.uk> wrote in message
news:th0apvsdto2nu5eje...@4ax.com...

> Following up to Adrian Tupper
>
> >> BTW If you climb Scafell Pike with a shepherd you need two
> >> things, the ability to tell a swaledale from a herdwicke and a
> >> good pair of legs :-) <puff!> I thought I had been up it quite a
> >> lot, he reckons 400+!
> >
> >So my 4 times (I think) is not material. I doubt if a shepherd
> >would go to the summit though.
> Mike Reid

So what do these shepherds look like and can just anyone walk up the hill
with him?


Mary Fisher

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Oct 21, 2003, 4:50:41 PM10/21/03
to

>
> You forgot the lamb! Absolutely the best I've ever eaten anywhere!

It was so good that I brought some back for the Blessed swroot ... who loved
it.

And some sheep heads, which she didn't try ...

Mary


Adrian Tupper

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Oct 21, 2003, 5:18:52 PM10/21/03
to
ReidŠ <don...@fell-walker.co.uk> wrote in
news:th0apvsdto2nu5eje...@4ax.com:

> Following up to Adrian Tupper
>
>>> BTW If you climb Scafell Pike with a shepherd you need two
>>> things, the ability to tell a swaledale from a herdwicke and a
>>> good pair of legs :-) <puff!> I thought I had been up it quite a
>>> lot, he reckons 400+!
>>
>>So my 4 times (I think) is not material. I doubt if a shepherd
>>would go to the summit though.
>
> His normal route was up Mickledor and along the summit ridge,
> pushing the sheep down into Hollow stones. He of course would not
> go and stand by the summit cairn but I have always seen that as
> rather a bogus activity. (I reckon i'm on about 35-40).

There can't be many people who have walked the Pike more than that!

> I reckon a hillwalking shepherd is quite a rarity, though a
> relative was a fellrunner, equally a busmans holiday.
>
> food ob: Mars bars

--
Adrian

ReidŠ

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Oct 22, 2003, 4:44:00 AM10/22/03
to
Following up to Judith Umbria

>> >So my 4 times (I think) is not material. I doubt if a shepherd
>> >would go to the summit though.
>> Mike Reid
>
>So what do these shepherds look like

"http://www.fellwalk.co.uk/wasdup5.htm"

Why do you ask?

>and can just anyone walk up the hill with him?

No, only superheroes and hardened mountain men like me. :-)

There was an outing organised to get two of the barstaff to the
top of Scafell Pike (Englands highest hill)

"http://www.fellwalk.co.uk/pict201c.htm"

We went along for the ride, being in the bar at the time.
Generally the farming community keep a little to themselves but
this one supplements the appalling prices paid for sheepmeat and
even worse prices for wool by working behind the bar.
If you walk into the climbers bar of the Wasdale Head and ask
(American accent will help) if a guide is available for Scafell
Pike, several people wil probably be killed in the rush.

ReidŠ

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Oct 22, 2003, 4:44:01 AM10/22/03
to
Following up to Adrian Tupper

> (I reckon i'm on about 35-40).


>
>There can't be