Wiki: 2 way mains lead

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meow...@care2.com

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Aug 12, 2008, 3:04:18 AM8/12/08
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Another article in the writing for your input...


2 way mains lead


Mains leads are available with 2x IEC connectors run from one plug.
These save sockets and space when running computers, AV systems, etc.

This article shows how to make these socket saving leads, and
discusses how to do so safely.


==The basics==
This lead is just 2 mains leads in one plug. Few people need
instructions on how to fit a plug, but when it comes to 2 leads in one
it isn't as easy, and some extra issues need considering.

For one example, everything only just fits into the plug, so its
necessary to get the wires the right length and lay the wires out
properly in the plug. Failure to do this usually results in a plug lid
that won't fit back on. Best practice is often ignored with a single
lead, but with two its necessary or the plug won't go together.


==Parts==
First you need 2 mains leads. These need to have the same outer
diameter [[flex|wire]]. It looks much neater if they're the same
length and style too.

[[image:Lead - wires fit 678-3.jpg|thumb|Checking the flexes fit]]
And you need a plug - but a lot of plugs won't work. You need one that
you can get both the leads into, side by side. It doesn't matter if
the fit is rather tight, but they do need to go in. Avoid any (old)
plug with a fibre cordgrip, these old cordgrips are entirely
inadequate for twin leads. Also avoid any plug with cordgrips that you
just press the flex into, these are unable to grip 2 leads.


==Tools==
* Wire cutters to cut the wire.
* [[Knives|Knife]] or [[Scissors|scissors]] to strip it
* Small [[screwdrivers|screwdriver]]


==Construction==
Cut the plugs off the 2 mains leads.

Strip enough of the outer pvc sheath off each lead.

[[image:Lead - cordgrip 679-3.jpg|thumb|Flexes in cordgrip - note
position of lives & neutrals]]

Fit both leads into the cordgrip, and tighten it up, making sure it
grips both [[flex]]es firmly. Position the flexes correctly, so that
the live is on the right and neutral on the left for both flexes.
There won't be space later to have wires crossing over each other
unnecessarily.

The easiest way to fit the flex into the cordgrip is to remove one
[[screws|screw]] completely, and undo the other as far as it goes.
Push the [[flex]]es in firmly, get them lined up evenly side by side,
not one above the other, before doing up both sides of the cordgrip.
The [[screwdrivers|screwdriver]] can be used to lever the flexes into
the right position. Tug on each flex to be sure its gripped firm.

If the plug won't grip both leads firmly, now is the time to reject
it. You'll only waste time otherwise.

[[image:Lead - lives ready 685-3.jpg|thumb|Lives ready to insert,
terminal fully open]]

Now fit the pairs of wires to each plug terminal.
# Cut the insulation to the correct length so there's no excess length
anywhere, and strip to leave about 1cm of bare copper wire at each
wire end.
# For each wire pair, check the strands are fully untwisted, place the
2 wires together and twist them as one. Double over the end, using
your nail to get a sharp bend. If necessary press on the resulting
folded wire to minimise its width.
# Its generally easiest to fit the [[Earthing types|earths]] first,
then lives then neutrals. The lives are the least easy to work with,
as they're so short.
# Before inserting the wires into each terminal, make sure the plug
[[screws]] are undone enough to give the full width of opening for
each terminal. You won't get far if you skip this.

[[image:Lead - all in 686-3.jpg|thumb|Wirea all in place]]
Press all the wires down into position as you go. If you make a
mistake on any wire length, redo it. Its very tempting to say who
cares, that'll work fine, but IME any slack wire normally results in
it being impossible to fit all the wires in at a later stage. The
small screwdriver is useful for pressing the wires down - its usually
a fairly tight fit.

[[image: - - - fuse in|thumb|Fuse in]]
Fit a suitable [[fuse]] - 5A for IEC connectors, 2A or 3A for figure
of 8 leads. Don't put 13A fuses in these leads.

Fit the plug lid. You might find a little wire repositioning is
needed, the screwdriver's useful for pressing wires into place.

[[image:Lead - finished 688-5.jpg|thumb|Finished lead]]
You now have a lead!


===Wire touble?===
[[flex|Wires]] too long should be cut to fit. If you get one too
short, gotta start again. There isn't normally enough room to
accomodate wires the wrong length.


==Safety==
A question often asked is how safe these leads are. The short answer
is perfectly safe if good practice is followed, but sometimes not if
it isn't.

Double leads are available from retail outlets such as computer
sellers and electrical shops, they conform to all relevant legislation
and pass PAT tests. The leads discussed here are constructed a little
differently, and the following questions are sometimes raised:

===One lead unplugged===
What happens if one lead is unplugged, is it safe lying on the floor?

An unplugged end is touch safe, but can be a risk to small children
and animals. Two way leads are recommended for use where this won't
occur. So they're suitable for computer systems, AV systems, hifis
etc, but aren't so well suited to assorted portable appliances that
may get unplugged individually. This is equally true of ready made and
home made leads.


===Plugs aren't designed for 2 flexes===
So is it safe?

There are 2 things affected by this: terminals and cordgrip.

====Terminals====
The terminals in plugs work safely with any wire size upto the biggest
that fits into the terminal. If it goes in, all is good.

====Cordgrips=====
Cordgrips are another matter. Many plug cordgrips are unable to firmly
grip 2 flexes, and such plugs should not be used. The functions of a
cordgrip are
# to stop the wire moving around in the plug, making the terminals
come loose
# To prevent the wire being pulled out

A robust and well sized cordgrip can do this with 2 flexes no problem.
Its very simple to check whether your chosen cordgrip is doing its
job, so all is well as long as you check this when making the lead.
* Both flexes should be gripped firm
* The cordgrip [[screws]] must go right the way through the plastic
cord grip strip.
* The old fibre cordgrip strips aren't strong enough
* screwless cordgrips don't work with 2 flexes.

===2 leads one fuse===
Is it safe having 2 leads on one [[fuse]]?

This is how it is with extension leads, adaptors and multi-way
sockets. Its not a safety problem.

===Overload===
Can these leads be overloaded?

Its physically possible to put 2 kettle leads in one plug, fit a 13A
fuse and draw 25A, so yes, it can be done if the potential issues are
ignored. The fuse in the plug provides some degree of overcurrent
protection, but not necessarily enough in every case. A 13A fuse for
example will pass over 20A for half an hour, failing to protect the
plug.

To be totally safe the leads are not recommended for high power uses,
and a 5A [[fuse]] or less is best to ensure the fuse provides complete
protection for plug and socket. A 5A plug fuse won't pass enough
current for enough time to damage a mains plug - higher rated fuses
can.

This issue is the same for factory made leads as home made ones, and
with a little basic care the leads are safe.

===Summary===
These leads are legal and safe if constructed and used in accordance
with good practice. However there are safety issues that can occur if
the extra issues of these leads are overlooked.


==See Also==
* [[Special:Allpages|Wiki Contents]]
* [[Special:Categories|Wiki Subject Categories]]

[[Category:Electrical]]
[[Category:Safety]]
[[Category:Tidy up]]


NT

dennis@home

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Aug 12, 2008, 3:13:37 AM8/12/08
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<meow...@care2.com> wrote in message
news:85937148-75c7-4729...@y21g2000hsf.googlegroups.com...

Add at the bottom....

Or pop into maplin and buy item # SH97F
which is a mains plug to two iec connectors.

The Medway Handyman

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Aug 12, 2008, 3:55:45 AM8/12/08
to
meow...@care2.com wrote:
> Another article in the writing for your input...
>
>
> 2 way mains lead
>
>
> Mains leads are available with 2x IEC connectors run from one plug.
> These save sockets and space when running computers, AV systems, etc.

I'm sure you know more about this subject than I do, but this seems like an
incredible bodge & not terribly safe.

If a customer asked me to do it I'd say no.


--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk


John

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Aug 12, 2008, 4:36:51 AM8/12/08
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"The Medway Handyman" <davi...@nospamblueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
news:5mbok.41296$E41....@text.news.virginmedia.com...

I can't visualise the ideal cable grip for two flexibles.


Steve Lupton

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Aug 12, 2008, 4:47:39 AM8/12/08
to
meow...@care2.com wrote:
> Another article in the writing for your input...
>
> 2 way mains lead
>
> Mains leads are available with 2x IEC connectors run from one plug.
> These save sockets and space when running computers, AV systems, etc.

... which are readily available from computer stores and DIY stores ...

> This article shows how to make these socket saving leads, and
> discusses how to do so safely.

I don't think it's possible to do it properly and safely.

The cord grip in a normal plug is designed for a single cable and the
inside of the plug will rarely have enough space for two sets of
conductors to be .

> Few people need
> instructions on how to fit a plug, but when it comes to 2 leads in one
> it isn't as easy, and some extra issues need considering.

I'd say the main consideration would be that it is not worth the hassle!

There is a really simple question I think which can be used to determine
whether or not something is a good idea.

1) Would you do it at a place of work? Or to take the example further, a
school?

2) Would you be happy if you had paid a professional to do some work and
they did this?

I'd say the answer to both of those questions is no, therefore it's
really not a good idea.

Please don't take this the wrong way. I really like the DIY Wiki and
appreciate all the hard work people put into it - especially yourself. I
just don't think this is a good article as it is not advocating good
practice.

Steve

Dave Plowman (News)

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Aug 12, 2008, 4:56:16 AM8/12/08
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In article <5mbok.41296$E41....@text.news.virginmedia.com>,

The Medway Handyman <davi...@nospamblueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
> > Another article in the writing for your input...
> >
> >
> > 2 way mains lead
> >
> >
> > Mains leads are available with 2x IEC connectors run from one plug.
> > These save sockets and space when running computers, AV systems, etc.

> I'm sure you know more about this subject than I do, but this seems like
> an incredible bodge & not terribly safe.

> If a customer asked me to do it I'd say no.

You can get trailing block IEC connectors - just like 13 amp ones. But you
might have to go to a pro supplier to get them. Places like CPC do them in
a chassis mounting strip (4 or 6) which you'd have to box up and add a
fuse.

--
*Never test the depth of the water with both feet.*

Dave Plowman da...@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.

dennis@home

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Aug 12, 2008, 5:06:54 AM8/12/08
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"Steve Lupton" <moc.liamg@pulevets> wrote in message
news:3qmdnUt2Ro6w0zzV...@giganews.com...


> Please don't take this the wrong way. I really like the DIY Wiki and
> appreciate all the hard work people put into it - especially yourself. I
> just don't think this is a good article as it is not advocating good
> practice.

However people do do such things already so anything that makes it safer is
good.

Its not worth it though when you can buy ready made leads to do the same
from maplin that are structurally sound.

PS if you cable tie the two cables together in the plug the grips works
fine, if there is enough space for the tie.

dennis@home

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Aug 12, 2008, 5:11:30 AM8/12/08
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"Dave Plowman (News)" <da...@davenoise.co.uk> wrote in message
news:4fcd9cb...@davenoise.co.uk...


> In article <5mbok.41296$E41....@text.news.virginmedia.com>,
> The Medway Handyman <davi...@nospamblueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
>> > Another article in the writing for your input...
>> >
>> >
>> > 2 way mains lead
>> >
>> >
>> > Mains leads are available with 2x IEC connectors run from one plug.
>> > These save sockets and space when running computers, AV systems, etc.
>
>> I'm sure you know more about this subject than I do, but this seems like
>> an incredible bodge & not terribly safe.
>
>> If a customer asked me to do it I'd say no.
>
> You can get trailing block IEC connectors - just like 13 amp ones. But you
> might have to go to a pro supplier to get them. Places like CPC do them in
> a chassis mounting strip (4 or 6) which you'd have to box up and add a
> fuse.
>

Like this?
http://www.twenga.co.uk/offer/170852666.html

Dave Plowman (News)

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Aug 12, 2008, 5:58:22 AM8/12/08
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In article <JYbok.40063$Z24....@newsfe19.ams2>,
John <Who90...@ntlworld.com> wrote:

> "The Medway Handyman" <davi...@nospamblueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:5mbok.41296$E41....@text.news.virginmedia.com...
> > meow...@care2.com wrote:
> >> Another article in the writing for your input...
> >>
> >>
> >> 2 way mains lead
> >>
> >>
> >> Mains leads are available with 2x IEC connectors run from one plug.
> >> These save sockets and space when running computers, AV systems, etc.
> >
> > I'm sure you know more about this subject than I do, but this seems
> > like an incredible bodge & not terribly safe.
> >
> > If a customer asked me to do it I'd say no.

> I can't visualise the ideal cable grip for two flexibles.

Plus I doubt you'd be able to fit two standard IEC leads into one plug -
the cables are too thick.

--
*When it rains, why don't sheep shrink? *

Andrew Gabriel

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Aug 12, 2008, 6:59:42 AM8/12/08
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In article <85937148-75c7-4729...@y21g2000hsf.googlegroups.com>,

meow...@care2.com writes:
> ===Summary===
> These leads are legal and safe if constructed and used in accordance
> with good practice.

Sorry, that's not the definition of legal. It needs to be constructed
in accordance with the relevant British Standards and EN's. I don't
have a copy of BS1363 handy, but I suspect 2 flexes into a rewirable
plug would be outside scope. Since 13A plugs have to conform to BS1363,
that would probably make it illegal.

This shouldn't be in the Wiki. Doing it for yourself or on a personal
web page might be different.

Last time I bought some properly made ones from CPC, I think they were
around £2 in any case.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]

whisky-dave

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Aug 12, 2008, 8:22:24 AM8/12/08
to

<meow...@care2.com> wrote in message
news:85937148-75c7-4729...@y21g2000hsf.googlegroups.com...
> Another article in the writing for your input...
>
>
> 2 way mains lead
>

I brought one of these for work and our PAT tester[1] wouldn't pass it.


[1] The physical human doing the testing rather than the machine itself.


DM

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Aug 12, 2008, 10:08:09 AM8/12/08
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Sometimes there is a certain type of employee who ends up doing PAT testing
etc. and they can be a right pain in the arse.

Bob Eager

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Aug 12, 2008, 10:19:01 AM8/12/08
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On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 08:36:51 UTC, "John" <Who90...@ntlworld.com>
wrote:

> "The Medway Handyman" <davi...@nospamblueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:5mbok.41296$E41....@text.news.virginmedia.com...
> > meow...@care2.com wrote:
> >> Another article in the writing for your input...
> >>
> >>
> >> 2 way mains lead
> >>
> >>
> >> Mains leads are available with 2x IEC connectors run from one plug.
> >> These save sockets and space when running computers, AV systems, etc.
> >
> > I'm sure you know more about this subject than I do, but this seems like
> > an incredible bodge & not terribly safe.
> >
> > If a customer asked me to do it I'd say no.
> >

> I can't visualise the ideal cable grip for two flexibles.

All of the numbers below are CPC ones, go to www.cpc.co.uk and type into
search.

There are cables with a moulded 'Y' block to reduce to a single cable
before it enters the plug; I have some of these with two IEC sockets and
an IEC plug. PL09625 and PL09132.

The 2 way one the OP is asking for is PL09626 or PL09627 depending on
length. I disagree with TMH here; nothing wrong with them at all, and
the plug is fused of course. This has a Y moukding and fairly short IEC
socket tails.

There's also FT00702 as a 5 way IEC outlet, PL-ST474030 as a 4-way
shuttered IEC outlet,

--
The information contained in this post is copyright the
poster, and specifically may not be published in, or used by
http://www.diybanter.com

Dave Liquorice

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Aug 12, 2008, 5:03:32 PM8/12/08
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On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 10:06:54 +0100, dennis@home wrote:

> Its not worth it though when you can buy ready made leads to do the same
> from maplin that are structurally sound.

Agreed buy the proper thing or a distribution block and male/female leads.
Oh and they may be structurally sound but it is not unknown for brand new
moulded mains leads to be wired incorrectly! They may be new but the
should be tested/checked before putting into service.

--
Cheers
Dave.

Dave Liquorice

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Aug 12, 2008, 5:04:30 PM8/12/08
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On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 07:55:45 GMT, The Medway Handyman wrote:

> If a customer asked me to do it I'd say no.

Not wander down to Maplin and sell on marked up 50%?

--
Cheers
Dave.

Dave Liquorice

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Aug 12, 2008, 5:06:52 PM8/12/08
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On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 09:36:51 +0100, John wrote:

> I can't visualise the ideal cable grip for two flexibles.

Provided the cables are the same size then the "push into the slot between
two bits of plastic" should work fine. I'm a little more dubious about the
normal two screws and bar type.

--
Cheers
Dave.

whisky-dave

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Aug 13, 2008, 8:37:53 AM8/13/08
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"DM" <d...@nospam.here> wrote in message
news:g7s5f7$kdj$1...@registered.motzarella.org...

I guess some are but he isn't, of course partly it's because the college
makes that person responsible for any accident that might occur.
This is so the college doesn't get sued but the individual will.

The problem is that the fuse in the plug is there to protect the cable not
the equipment. In that respect most of these 2 way Y IEC cables are
10 amp cables (CSA 1.0mm^2) with a13 amp socket in the plug. If both IEC
connectors are
plugged in to appliances that take more than 5 amps each you'll exceed the
cables capacity that enters in to the plug and the fuse won't blow until
over 13 amps
is passed through the 10 amp cable.

Recently we brought 20 pieces of equipment from a company and they supplied
10 amp IEC cables with 13 amp fuses fitted. So he replaced all the 13 amp
fuse with 5amp.
We also won't allow the shaver type 2 pin plugs with the adaptors.
We also require that all 3 pin plugs have those sheathed pins for L&N .
So far he has tested over 7,000 items.

>


Grimly Curmudgeon

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Aug 13, 2008, 6:30:25 PM8/13/08
to
We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
drugs began to take hold. I remember meow...@care2.com saying something
like:

>This article shows how to make these socket saving leads, and
>discusses how to do so safely.

I've done this a few times, but no way is it a permanent solution - the
cable grip just doesn't grip for long. Temp bodge only.
--
Dave
GS850x2 XS650 SE6a

"It's a moron working with power tools.
How much more suspenseful can you get?"
- House

Message has been deleted

whisky-dave

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Aug 14, 2008, 8:34:44 AM8/14/08
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"Paul Matthews" <pa...@cattytown.me.uk> wrote in message
news:nao7a4dq2nn20gck3...@4ax.com...

>
> Especially when they are available ready made. SH97F from Maplin. £9.

£3.29 at Rapid.

http://www.rapidonline.com/productinfo.aspx?tier1URL=Cables-Connectors&tier2URL=Connectors-Mains-Power&tier3URL=Cordsets&tier4URL=1-IEC-C14-to-2-Female-IEC-C13-connector-2.5m&moduleno=71965&kw=Mains+IEC


dennis@home

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Aug 14, 2008, 5:27:59 PM8/14/08
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meow...@care2.com

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Aug 14, 2008, 9:07:40 PM8/14/08
to
On Aug 12, 8:04 am, meow2...@care2.com wrote:
> Another article in the writing for your input...
>
> 2 way mains lead

Well, I think its been outvoted. Lets not kid ourselves its by fact
though, more by basic subject ignorance. Thats the limitation of
wikis.


NT

whisky-dave

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Aug 15, 2008, 8:36:05 AM8/15/08
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"dennis@home" <den...@killspam.kicks-ass.net> wrote in message
news:g82810$kkk$1...@news.datemas.de...

But you still have to buy the four IEC leads and wire them up.

>


Mike Tomlinson

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Aug 19, 2008, 5:31:21 AM8/19/08
to
In article <g7vna1$n3j$2...@registered.motzarella.org>, Grimly Curmudgeon
<grimly...@REMOVEgmail.com> writes

>I've done this a few times, but no way is it a permanent solution - the
>cable grip just doesn't grip for long. Temp bodge only.

Depends on the plug. The ones with a nylon cord grip are fine.

zym...@technologist.com

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Aug 19, 2008, 6:48:06 AM8/19/08
to
On Aug 12, 8:55 am, "The Medway Handyman"
<davidl...@nospamblueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

> meow2...@care2.com wrote:
> > Another article in the writing for your input...
>
> > 2 way mains lead
>
> > Mains leads are available with 2x IEC connectors run from one plug.
> > These save sockets and space when running computers, AV systems, etc.
>
> I'm sure you know more about this subject than I do, but this seems like an
> incredible bodge & not terribly safe.
>
> If a customer asked me to do it I'd say no.

But low power stuff like LCD monitors wouldn't overload a single plug
and splitter to 2 IEC connectors.

But as you say, it's not ideal, when you can easily buy cable
concentrators, or a multiway plug block (either 3 pin or female IEC).

For me, I usually use continental 3 pin multiway adapter blocks for my
computers e.g.

http://www.dvdprice.it/image.php?productid=17505
or
http://eshop.speedyrecycle-eshop.com/images/product/MULTIPRESA%206.jpg

as the adaptors/plugs are much less bulky than the UK 13A ones.

P.

Grimly Curmudgeon

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Aug 19, 2008, 7:31:58 PM8/19/08
to
We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
drugs began to take hold. I remember Mike Tomlinson
<nos...@jasper.org.uk.invalid> saying something like:

Try tripping over one of the leads a couple of times and see how the
cord grip resists the pull. I'm looking at one right now with a nylon
grip that has allowed the leads to get pulled out. I made this one up
about twelve years ago (the usual, temporary measure that got forgotten
about) and it's never been tripped over, all that ever happened to that
was normal use.
As I said - temp bodge only to get out of trouble but not permanent. I
most certainly would never leave a setup like that in anyone else's
house - just asking for trouble.

Mike Tomlinson

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Aug 20, 2008, 12:42:11 PM8/20/08
to
In article <g7ukl1$25c$1@qmul>, whisky-dave <whisky-
da...@final.front.ear> writes

>We also won't allow the shaver type 2 pin plugs with the adaptors.

Not even the "proper" adaptors with fuses, e.g.

<http://cpc.farnell.com/PL09954/cable-wire-connectors/product.us0?sku=po
wer-connections-fcp-bk-3a>

These are well made and I've used several.

whisky-dave

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Aug 20, 2008, 8:44:33 AM8/20/08
to

"Mike Tomlinson" <nos...@jasper.org.uk.invalid> wrote in message
news:iAxgXeBj...@jasper.org.uk...

Not as far as I know, we're just told we can't use shaver adapter plugs.
of course this sort of directive rarley comes from anyone thast knows
about anything other than administration and creating a meaningful job out
of nothing. Normally I'd suggest that we would cut off the two pin socket
and hardwire a proper 3 pin plug to it.
Actually I should try to find oout whether this plug would be suitable,
I'll get back to it, although this might take a few weeks ;-)

>


meow...@care2.com

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Aug 20, 2008, 10:13:35 AM8/20/08
to
On Aug 12, 8:04 am, meow2...@care2.com wrote:
> Another article in the writing for your input...
>
> 2 way mains lead
>
> Mains leads are available with 2x IEC connectors run from one plug.

If I get some time I'll address the points raised in response to the
proposed article.


NT

Andrew Gabriel

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Aug 20, 2008, 7:24:26 PM8/20/08
to
In article <g8h3lf$rhc$1@qmul>,

"whisky-dave" <whisk...@final.front.ear> writes:
>
> "Mike Tomlinson" <nos...@jasper.org.uk.invalid> wrote in message
> news:iAxgXeBj...@jasper.org.uk...
>> In article <g7ukl1$25c$1@qmul>, whisky-dave <whisky-
>> da...@final.front.ear> writes
>>
>>>We also won't allow the shaver type 2 pin plugs with the adaptors.
>>
>> Not even the "proper" adaptors with fuses, e.g.
>>
>> <http://cpc.farnell.com/PL09954/cable-wire-connectors/product.us0?sku=po
>> wer-connections-fcp-bk-3a>
>>
>> These are well made and I've used several.
>
> Not as far as I know, we're just told we can't use shaver adapter plugs.
> of course this sort of directive rarley comes from anyone thast knows
> about anything other than administration and creating a meaningful job out
> of nothing. Normally I'd suggest that we would cut off the two pin socket
> and hardwire a proper 3 pin plug to it.

That would be an interesting shave with my braun, as what comes
out of the 2-pin plug down the wire is something like 4VDC.

whisky-dave

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Aug 21, 2008, 8:32:12 AM8/21/08
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"Andrew Gabriel" <and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:48aca7aa$0$630$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk...

Interesting, so yuo have some sort of circuitry in your adapter ?
Here we've had studetn runnig laptops off these shaver adapters plugs,
or perhaps more correctly called Euro Two pin sockets.

Andrew Gabriel

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Aug 21, 2008, 1:24:55 PM8/21/08
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In article <g8jna9$ll$1@qmul>,

"whisky-dave" <whisk...@final.front.ear> writes:
>
> "Andrew Gabriel" <and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:48aca7aa$0$630$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk...
>> In article <g8h3lf$rhc$1@qmul>,
>> "whisky-dave" <whisk...@final.front.ear> writes:
>>> Not as far as I know, we're just told we can't use shaver adapter plugs.
>>> of course this sort of directive rarley comes from anyone thast knows
>>> about anything other than administration and creating a meaningful job
>>> out
>>> of nothing. Normally I'd suggest that we would cut off the two pin
>>> socket
>>> and hardwire a proper 3 pin plug to it.
>>
>> That would be an interesting shave with my braun, as what comes
>> out of the 2-pin plug down the wire is something like 4VDC.

Actually, it's 12V 7W (just checked).

> Interesting, so yuo have some sort of circuitry in your adapter ?

A minature switch mode PSU in the plug I presume (no
adapter).

> Here we've had studetn runnig laptops off these shaver adapters plugs,
> or perhaps more correctly called Euro Two pin sockets.

A UK shaver plug has thicker pins on a narrower spacing
than the Euro two pin plug (of which there is more than
one type in any case).

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