Cavity walls

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Doki

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Mar 22, 2008, 6:35:11 AM3/22/08
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Can anyone tell me when cavity walls become common?
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The Natural Philosopher

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Mar 22, 2008, 9:28:18 AM3/22/08
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m...@privacy.net wrote:
> On 22 Mar,
> "Doki" <mrd...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Can anyone tell me when cavity walls become common?
>
> How long is a bit of string? I've seen Victorian cavity walls in terraced
> houses, and non cavity walls in 1930's semis.
>
> More exposed areas tended to adopt them first.
>
I would say 'more often than not' post WWII.

I cant think of many post war houses that don't have cavities. But
plenty of 30's style ones with solid walls exist.


There was a great drive to regulate everything in the post war labour
government.

dennis@home

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Mar 22, 2008, 12:08:45 PM3/22/08
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"The Natural Philosopher" <a@b.c> wrote in message
news:12061925...@proxy02.news.clara.net...


> m...@privacy.net wrote:
>> On 22 Mar, "Doki" <mrd...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Can anyone tell me when cavity walls become common?
>>
>> How long is a bit of string? I've seen Victorian cavity walls in terraced
>> houses, and non cavity walls in 1930's semis.
>>
>> More exposed areas tended to adopt them first.
>>
> I would say 'more often than not' post WWII.
>
> I cant think of many post war houses that don't have cavities. But plenty
> of 30's style ones with solid walls exist.

Lots of houses were built without cavities after the war, including many
thousands of system built ones like Smith's houses.

.

Rob

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Mar 22, 2008, 1:50:10 PM3/22/08
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Doki wrote:
> Can anyone tell me when cavity walls become common?

My house was built in 1928 with 11" cavities

Ed Sirett

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Mar 22, 2008, 2:35:58 PM3/22/08
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...or rebuilt ones like mine (built 1949 to the original non-cavity
'standard')

--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk
Gas fitting FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/GasFitting.html
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Edward W. Thompson

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Mar 23, 2008, 2:26:08 AM3/23/08
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My house is circa 1922 with cavities although the gable ends are
without. Anyone know why the trend in those days, as I have been
told, was not to make gable ends with cavities?

Andy Champ

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Mar 23, 2008, 3:25:26 PM3/23/08
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The cavity is 11 inch - or the whole wall?

If you mean the cavity - did you ever lose any cats?

Andy

Keith2.0

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Mar 24, 2008, 8:44:21 AM3/24/08
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On Sat, 22 Mar 2008 17:50:10 +0000, Rob <go...@fishin.com> wrote:

Youd get value for money getting them insulated.

Rob

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Mar 24, 2008, 9:52:40 AM3/24/08
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Done that years ago... Maybe it is a 9" cavity. Recently a
builder was surprised to find the flooring screed was "coke"
fused by heat. The place was like a coal mine for weeks.
Cats.... Ugh!

Tony Bryer

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Mar 24, 2008, 5:15:45 PM3/24/08
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On Sun, 23 Mar 2008 06:26:08 +0000 Edward W. Thompson wrote :
> My house is circa 1922 with cavities although the gable ends are
> without. Anyone know why the trend in those days, as I have been
> told, was not to make gable ends with cavities?

The reason for adopting cavity walls, contrary to what we were
always told at school (insulation) was to prevent damp penetration,
so there would be no particular reason to include a cavity on gable
walls - a damp patch in the loft wouldn't affect anything.

In my BCO patch, SW London, solid walls were the norm up to WW2,
which appalled a colleague who came from Portsmouth where they were
adopted much earlier due to the greater amount of driving rain.

--
Tony Bryer SDA UK 'Software to build on' http://www.sda.co.uk

Andy Hall

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Mar 25, 2008, 2:44:25 PM3/25/08
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No change there, then.


Tony Bryer

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Mar 25, 2008, 3:21:41 PM3/25/08
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On Sat, 22 Mar 2008 13:28:18 +0000 The Natural Philosopher wrote :
> I cant think of many post war houses that don't have cavities. But
> plenty of 30's style ones with solid walls exist.
>
> There was a great drive to regulate everything in the post war
> labour government.

I suspect that it was less to do with regulation and more to do with
the realisation that with cavity walls you could use something other
than brick (e.g. breeze blocks) for the inner skin, all building
materials being in short supply after the war. All the pre-war cavity
wall houses I ever saw were brick/brick.

Doctor Drivel

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Mar 26, 2008, 9:58:39 AM3/26/08
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"Rob" <go...@fishin.com> wrote in message
news:64kv6oF...@mid.individual.net...

> Doki wrote:
>> Can anyone tell me when cavity walls become common?
>
> My house was built in 1928 with 11" cavities

Cavity fill that and your house will be like toast and no heating bills.

Doctor Drivel

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Mar 26, 2008, 10:01:01 AM3/26/08
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"Andy Hall" <an...@hall.nospam> wrote in message news:47e94809@qaanaaq...

A good thing Matt. They haven't gone far enough. You need regulation
indeed.

Doctor Drivel

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Mar 26, 2008, 10:02:57 AM3/26/08
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"Tony Bryer" <to...@delme.sda.co.uk> wrote in message
news:VA.000045e...@delme.sda.co.uk...

The cavities were to stop damp. The skill levels were not high, so putting
two walls reduced the likelihood of a damp claim

Doctor Drivel

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Mar 26, 2008, 10:04:53 AM3/26/08
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"Edward W. Thompson" <thom...@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
news:gstbu35j61atqrikk...@4ax.com...

Poor brickie skills after WW1. Many were trained quickly. They failed in
the detail aspects around doors and windows. A whole blank wall was fine

Doctor Drivel

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Mar 26, 2008, 10:05:57 AM3/26/08
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"Keith2.0" <thelyrica...@hotmail.co.uk> wrote in message
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And very low heating bills. Make the house air tight and near an eco house.

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