Multi-point locks and wooden doors

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Mark Spice

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Jun 11, 2011, 6:05:41 AM6/11/11
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SWMBO is set on a new front door and wants one with multipoint locking.
However due to the render and finish on the house it will be a major pain in
the arse to try and fit a composite door with new frame. Therefore a
standard replacement wooden door (which I prefer anyway) has been selected.
Has any tried using multipoint locking in such a door? Are there any
pitfalls that we should be aware of?

Cheers

MArk

d...@gglz.com

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Jun 11, 2011, 7:21:04 AM6/11/11
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Your joinery skills need to be excellent. You will need to cut the
stepped channel for the multipoint in the edge of the door with a
router, and the mortices for the mechanism(s). This really needs to be
precise, and right first time. You're probably going to have to hand
cut the hook/roller/latch strikers into the frame.

I fitted multipoint locks into a set of double doors on a chapel. The
slave door has bolts top and bottom into the frame, operated from a
central handle, with an internal thumbturn latch only, and a false
mullion to carry the hook/roller/latch striker plates for the master
door. The master door has bolts top and bottom into the frame, two
hooks, two rollers and a latch (with keyturn both sides) into the
slave door. Final results are excellent, I think it would take a
sledgehammer and some persistence to force them.

(if security is high on your agenda - and I guess it is if you've
chosen to fit a multipoint in a timber door - be aware that many euro-
cylinders are also vulnerable. Evva 3KS, if you can accept the cost,
is one of the best lock cylinders)

I'd recommend you use 3 or 4 lift-off hinges (I didn't, but
subsequently have started using them everywhere), as you may find you
have to tweak the fitting once or twice, and they reduce some of the
struggle with weight of the door. I also had the luxury of making the
doors and frame from scratch, so had the opportunity to cut the lock
channels/strikers before assembling the doors/frame.

PVC doors tend to have a bit of flex in them which provides some slop
for less than perfect alignment. With a solid timber door, your work
must be precise. There is some slop adjustment in the strikers, but
not the top and bottom bolts.

I don't want to put you off too much - but your joinery should be of
the level "I check my work with vernier callipers - because I sure
can't see any inaccuracies"

As ever, and like everything else, practice on some scrap material
first! It's very satisfying to engineer wood, and is doable with
plenty of patience, good chisel-work and a router.

fred

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Jun 11, 2011, 8:04:03 AM6/11/11
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In article
<7a690b4b-bced-4008...@g28g2000yqa.googlegroups.com>,
d...@gglz.com <d...@gglz.com> writes

Good tips. Care to share the info on the hardware you used? Are there
any multipoint sets that don't try to lock the latch handle when they
lock? I see that as a challenge to the scrotes who attempt to move it by
levering (even though that doesn't open the door) and end up buggering
up the mechanism.

As an alternative, on a single door, I have used 2 BS mortice locks on
the lock side and an oversize piano style hinge on the hinge side.

Any pics of the chapel install?
--
fred
FIVE TV's superbright logo - not the DOG's, it's bollocks

d...@gglz.com

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Jun 11, 2011, 8:55:48 AM6/11/11
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> Care to share the info on the hardware you used?

Lockmaster. They do a specific double-door set.

> Are there any multipoint sets that don't try to lock the latch handle when they
> lock?

Not that I know of.

> Any pics of the chapel install?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gglz/5335202957/in/set-72157625649679497/

fred

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Jun 11, 2011, 9:33:55 AM6/11/11
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In article
<5370cb77-bb64-459a...@l18g2000yql.googlegroups.com>,
d...@gglz.com <d...@gglz.com> writes

>
>> Care to share the info on the hardware you used?
>
>Lockmaster. They do a specific double-door set.
>
Thanks, the hookbolt versions look interesting, shocking website though.

>> Are there any multipoint sets that don't try to lock the latch handle when they
>> lock?
>
>Not that I know of.
>
>> Any pics of the chapel install?
>
>http://www.flickr.com/photos/gglz/5335202957/in/set-72157625649679497/

Nicely done, thanks for sharing.

Jim K

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Jun 11, 2011, 2:53:32 PM6/11/11
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respect is due ;>)

Jim K

Steve Walker

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Jun 11, 2011, 5:30:26 PM6/11/11
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Awe.


jgharston

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Jun 11, 2011, 10:23:53 PM6/11/11
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gglzm wrote:

> Mark Spice wrote:
> > standard replacement wooden door (which I prefer anyway) has been selected.
> > Has any tried using multipoint locking in such a door? Are there any
>
> Your joinery skills need to be excellent. You will need to cut the
...

That's just the sort of thing I want to replace the lock on this:
http://pics.mdfs.net/2010/04/100428.htm with. Thanks for the
advice.

JGH

Andy Champ

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Jun 12, 2011, 11:11:05 AM6/12/11
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On 11/06/2011 12:21, d...@gglz.com wrote:
> I don't want to put you off too much - but your joinery should be of
> the level "I check my work with vernier callipers - because I sure
> can't see any inaccuracies"

That's scary. Make sure your paintwork is perfect too, because you
don't want the wood drying out and shrinking, or getting damp and
expanding, with the seasons...

Andy

d...@gglz.com

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Jun 12, 2011, 12:07:19 PM6/12/11
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I doubt the multopoint lock strip would tolerate much warping in the
door. Vaguely from memory - the main channel was 15 mm wide by 2mm
deep (to hold the metal strip) with an 11mm wide by 9mm deep channel
within that (to hold the backplate containing the gubbins/trackrods on
the back). Plus mortices for the mechanisms.

With a quality commercial exterior timber door, it should be pretty
flat (though I would check, and if necessary return it, if the lock
side is bowed by more than say 2-3mm).

The door will need to close up very evenly into the frame too, so
checks for true/squareness needed here as well.

I've found these hinges...

http://www.screwfix.com/p/lift-off-hinge-satin-stainless-steel-102-x-89mm-left-hand-pack-of-2/51305

...make it easier to hang a door accurately, as they are suited to
using a 25mm router bit to produce a perfectly parallel recess.

(note the hinges come in left and right - and aren't interchangeable)

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