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OT: Duracell leakage

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Scott

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Feb 18, 2024, 10:45:17 AMFeb 18
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Once upon a time, Duracell used to guarantee to replace any equipment
damaged by leakage from a Duracell battery. Now I find that leakage is
commonplace if the battery is left for a long time. Does the guarantee
still apply? That said, I have not recently known anything to be
damaged as the deposit seems to be a white powder easily removed using
a screwdriver.

Brian

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Feb 18, 2024, 1:17:27 PMFeb 18
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Are you sure they are / were genuine Duracell batteries?

I used to used Kirkland batteries ( CostCo own brand) but they seem
especially bad for leakage in my experience.

Tim+

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Feb 18, 2024, 1:24:22 PMFeb 18
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Used to be my impression that Duracell was a “quality” brand but they do
seem to leak a lot these days. Hard to tell as it’s possible that it’s
just the brand that I’ve bought most of but I’ve come across some really
old non-Duracell batteries that haven’t leaked.

Tim

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Cursitor Doom

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Feb 18, 2024, 1:26:53 PMFeb 18
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I had thought leaking batteries were a thing of the past, but had this
issue with an aluminium torch. The seapage got between the threads of
the cap where it screws in to hold the batteries and has welded it
solid. I cannot get the cap off. I've tried putting the body of the
torch in a vice and using a strap wrench (normally used for oil
filters) on the cap, but it will *not* budge!
I'd really like to get it off so I can see which battery manufacturer
is the culprit.

Theo

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Feb 18, 2024, 4:04:21 PMFeb 18
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I think it's got passed around the houses - first Proctor and Gamble, now
Berkshire Hathaway. It does seem to still be a separate company, not just a
brand slapped on random Chinese batteries. But personally I don't rate them
very highly and wouldn't pay a premium for them.

(There's also Duracell branded products like phone chargers which likely are
their brand slapped on stuff made by others)

Theo

alan_m

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Feb 18, 2024, 4:07:19 PMFeb 18
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Duracell batteries, especially AA and AAA, are guaranteed to leak. I
stopped using them a long time ago because of this problem.

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Scott

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Feb 18, 2024, 4:08:46 PMFeb 18
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On 18 Feb 2024 21:04:14 +0000 (GMT), Theo
The ones we get are from Belgium (usually) but the OEM ones are made
in China with a 'not for retail sale' warning. I have not worked out
whether this means they are not as good or if there is another reason
such as import duty.

Robert

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Feb 18, 2024, 4:19:08 PMFeb 18
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The white stuff is water soluble , I use a old toothbrush dipped in
water to remove then contact cleaner or IPA.
Get a lot of this in the Charity Shop where I check donated tech items,
modern contacts seem to survive, interesting vintage stuff contacts
rust and disappear.

Bob Eager

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Feb 18, 2024, 4:56:47 PMFeb 18
to
Oh, they are genuine. This is widespread.

They're known as Duraleak these days.



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Scott

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Feb 19, 2024, 4:36:42 AMFeb 19
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On Sun, 18 Feb 2024 21:07:14 +0000, alan_m <ju...@admac.myzen.co.uk>
wrote:
Has the composition changed?

Paul

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Feb 19, 2024, 5:33:56 AMFeb 19
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The behavior of Duracell products, has been consistent for a long long time.

It boggles the mind, why they don't do something about it.

What is hard to determine, is whether we are seeing the work of the
original company or not. Duracell offered its name, for branding bodges
(the Duracell USB sticks, which are not made by Duracell), and you
have to wonder what kind of company is behind the manufacture of the
cells.

If other companies can make cells that don't leak and are 10 years
past their best-before date, then Duracell can do that too.

Most companies would have a "continuous improvement" policy,
examining field results and attempting to improve on them.

I've done a couple sweeps of the house, and I think I've collected
all the Duracell I could find.

Paul

The Natural Philosopher

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Feb 19, 2024, 5:49:36 AMFeb 19
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On 19/02/2024 10:33, Paul wrote:
> On 2/19/2024 4:36 AM, Scott wrote:
>> On Sun, 18 Feb 2024 21:07:14 +0000, alan_m <ju...@admac.myzen.co.uk>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> On 18/02/2024 18:24, Tim+ wrote:
>>>> Scott <newsg...@gefion.myzen.co.uk> wrote:
>>>>> Once upon a time, Duracell used to guarantee to replace any equipment
>>>>> damaged by leakage from a Duracell battery. Now I find that leakage is
>>>>> commonplace if the battery is left for a long time. Does the guarantee
>>>>> still apply? That said, I have not recently known anything to be
>>>>> damaged as the deposit seems to be a white powder easily removed using
>>>>> a screwdriver.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Used to be my impression that Duracell was a “quality” brand but they do
>>>> seem to leak a lot these days. Hard to tell as it’s possible that it’s
>>>> just the brand that I’ve bought most of but I’ve come across some really
>>>> old non-Duracell batteries that haven’t leaked.
>>>>
>>>> Tim
>>>>
>>> Duracell batteries, especially AA and AAA, are guaranteed to leak. I
>>> stopped using them a long time ago because of this problem.
>>
>> Has the composition changed?
>>
>
> The behavior of Duracell products, has been consistent for a long long time.
>
"Duracell Inc. is an American manufacturer of alkaline batteries,
specialty cells, and rechargeables; it is a wholly owned subsidiary of
Berkshire Hathaway."


The behaviour of Berkshire Hathaway is also consistent. Ask how Moodys
came to rate subprime mortgages and icelandic banks as AAA.


> It boggles the mind, why they don't do something about it.
>
> What is hard to determine, is whether we are seeing the work of the
> original company or not.

Triggers broom. Corporately and legally it is still the same company.

> Duracell offered its name, for branding bodges
> (the Duracell USB sticks, which are not made by Duracell), and you
> have to wonder what kind of company is behind the manufacture of the
> cells.
>
> If other companies can make cells that don't leak and are 10 years
> past their best-before date, then Duracell can do that too.
>
But why bother making good sells when spending money on wanking rabbits
that never come to orgasm is cheaper.

> Most companies would have a "continuous improvement" policy,
> examining field results and attempting to improve on them.
>

Bless!
Most companies today have a manufacturing cost reduction budget with
the saving spent on marketing an inferior product.

> I've done a couple sweeps of the house, and I think I've collected
> all the Duracell I could find.
>
Dustbin of history.

They work OK for me in my mice and keyboards.
I don't think I have much that goes flat and stays flat for years
anyway, which is usually the killer


> Paul

--
“But what a weak barrier is truth when it stands in the way of an
hypothesis!”

Mary Wollstonecraft

Rod Speed

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Feb 19, 2024, 2:18:16 PMFeb 19
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Not convinced that china does it like that with stuff like dry cells.

Peeler

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Feb 19, 2024, 3:12:41 PMFeb 19
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On Tue, 20 Feb 2024 06:18:08 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

<FLUSH the abnormal trolling senile cretin's latest trollshit unread>

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