50+ year-old gas cooker with stiff gas taps

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peterm...@googlemail.com

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Feb 22, 2009, 1:08:21 PM2/22/09
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The New World seventy-six cooker I have needs the taps / knobs
lubricating - I saw something on a previous post suggesting gss cock
grease. Is this the stuff, and is it straightforward to dismantle and
re-grease them? A gas engineer I spoke to muttered darkly about carbon
monoxide and said any engineer would charge £100 to come out and then
slap a condemned label on it to cover himself. I like the cooker but
like life more - should I think of scrapping it for safety? The flame
on one burner was a little yellow, to I closed what I took to be an
air inlet screw on the cast iron pipe leading to it - this improved it
but even fully tightened the flame is still a little yellow. Would re-
greasing the taps help this - and should I be in there at all? Thanks
for advice.
Peter

cynic

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Feb 22, 2009, 1:30:41 PM2/22/09
to

Greasing gas taps is relatively simple, do not use excessive amounts
of grease or you may clog the injector and bypass ports. As with all
such jobs you really ought to have the facility to check the cock is
closing of correctly and does not leak around the barrel on completion
(a little leak detector spray might be a reassurance here) With
respect to the yellow flame, a thorough clean out of the air inlet,
burner mixing tube and the burner head may work wonders. Your screw
adjustment needs a bit more clarification. Is it a screw which
projects into the mixing tube? If so the effect of screwing it in is
to create a resistance to the flow of gas and air from the injector
jet to the burner and would tend to soften the flame by reducing the
airflow. Less air, same amount of gas will tend to cause yellowing of
the flame not reduce it. On an old burner scaling and corrosion may be
causing a restriction within the casting. Try a stiff baby bottle
brush or similar

peterm...@googlemail.com

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Feb 22, 2009, 3:26:18 PM2/22/09
to

Thanks for all that. I will see if I can get hold of some gas cock
grease and give it a go...What I described as 'adjusting screws' are
located on the top of the mixing tubes, just behind the taps. I'd
assumed they were to adjust the gas / air mix, but from what you are
saying that is not really correct. I am wondering what their purpose
is? I will start with a thorough clean as you suggest and go from
there.

The Medway Handyman

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Feb 22, 2009, 4:00:51 PM2/22/09
to
peterm...@googlemail.com wrote:
> The New World seventy-six cooker I have needs the taps / knobs
> lubricating - I saw something on a previous post suggesting gss cock
> grease. Is this the stuff, and is it straightforward to dismantle and
> re-grease them? A gas engineer I spoke to muttered darkly about carbon
> monoxide and said any engineer would charge £100 to come out and then
> slap a condemned label on it to cover himself. I like the cooker but
> like life more - should I think of scrapping it for safety?

50+ years old?

I'd get rid of the bloody thing as soon as possible, before it kills you.


--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk


meow...@care2.com

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Feb 22, 2009, 4:24:14 PM2/22/09
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I cant think of anything about a modern cooker that a 1950s one doesnt
have, other than insulation in the oven cavity wall. Just as safe.


NT

Rod

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Feb 22, 2009, 4:29:25 PM2/22/09
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Age, of itself, doesn't make something dangerous, does it? OK - maybe
some materials have deteriorated, some wear has occurred, it might not
have all possible the safety features we expect, but if it has worked
for 50 years without (we assume) killing anyone, is it really more
likely to kill someone tomorrow than on the day it was first installed?

If it is like the old New World cooker I had, the biggest issue I can
think of is lack of any flame failure mechanism. But its extremely solid
build was a plus.

--
Rod

Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
onset.
Although common it frequently goes undiagnosed.
<www.thyromind.info> <www.thyroiduk.org> <www.altsupportthyroid.org>

peterm...@googlemail.com

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Feb 22, 2009, 4:53:33 PM2/22/09
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On Feb 22, 9:29 pm, Rod <polygo...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
> The Medway Handyman wrote:

Yes it's really well made. Is flame failure cut-out now standard?
Never come across it.. My safety concerns are to do with the age of
the thing, but although not an expert I don't usually think of age as
bad (increasingly so!); just depends on the context. Call me old
fashioned but mountains of recently manufactured stuff being dumped to
be replaced ad infinitum doesn't seem to make sense...

Rod

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Feb 22, 2009, 4:58:04 PM2/22/09
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peterm...@googlemail.com wrote:
<>
> Yes it's really well made. Is flame failure cut-out now standard?
> Never come across it.. My safety concerns are to do with the age of
> the thing, but although not an expert I don't usually think of age as
> bad (increasingly so!); just depends on the context. Call me old
> fashioned but mountains of recently manufactured stuff being dumped to
> be replaced ad infinitum doesn't seem to make sense...

Truth to tell, I just *assumed* that some such would be fitted to the
oven and grill (but possibly not the rings) - after posting I suddenly
realised that I don't know - hopefully someone who does know will now post.

ARWadsworth

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Feb 22, 2009, 5:02:11 PM2/22/09
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<meow...@care2.com> wrote in message
news:ca9d3ef5-8498-4437...@j8g2000yql.googlegroups.com...

The Medway Handyman wrote:
> peterm...@googlemail.com wrote:
> > The New World seventy-six cooker I have needs the taps / knobs
> > lubricating - I saw something on a previous post suggesting gss cock
> > grease. Is this the stuff, and is it straightforward to dismantle and
> > re-grease them? A gas engineer I spoke to muttered darkly about carbon
> > monoxide and said any engineer would charge ?100 to come out and then

> > slap a condemned label on it to cover himself. I like the cooker but
> > like life more - should I think of scrapping it for safety?
>
> 50+ years old?
>
> I'd get rid of the bloody thing as soon as possible, before it kills you.

I cant think of anything about a modern cooker that a 1950s one doesnt
have, other than insulation in the oven cavity wall. Just as safe.


NT

It might work with town gas if needed to.

Adam


A.Lee

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Feb 22, 2009, 5:07:58 PM2/22/09
to
Rod <poly...@ntlworld.com> wrote:

> peterm...@googlemail.com wrote:
> <>
> > Yes it's really well made. Is flame failure cut-out now standard?
> > Never come across it.. My safety concerns are to do with the age of
> > the thing, but although not an expert I don't usually think of age as
> > bad (increasingly so!); just depends on the context. Call me old
> > fashioned but mountains of recently manufactured stuff being dumped to
> > be replaced ad infinitum doesn't seem to make sense...
>
> Truth to tell, I just *assumed* that some such would be fitted to the
> oven and grill (but possibly not the rings) - after posting I suddenly
> realised that I don't know - hopefully someone who does know will now post.

No, flame failure is rare on hobs. That's why 22mm pipe is used for gas
nowadays, when a big boiler kicks in, it could suck up enough of the gas
in a pipe, that a lit burner on a hob temporarily goes out as gas flow
is reduced so much, the gas flow would resume fairly quickly, but it
wouldnt be lit.
Separate gas pipes to the cooker and boiler usually solve this, as well
as the bigger bore pipes now required on boilers.
Alan.
--
To reply by e-mail, change the ' + ' to 'plus'.

YAPH

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Feb 22, 2009, 6:14:23 PM2/22/09
to
On Sun, 22 Feb 2009 13:24:14 -0800, meow2222 wrote:

> I cant think of anything about a modern cooker that a 1950s one doesnt
> have, other than insulation in the oven cavity wall. Just as safe.

Flame failure device, in the oven at least and increasingly nowadays on
the burners too (mandatory in blocks of flats).

Plus taps and regulators that are designed for higher pressure NG (aka
North Sea gas) rather than ancient Town Gas.

--
John Stumbles -- http://yaph.co.uk

You'll make some woman a fine husband, Dr Frankenstein

YAPH

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Feb 22, 2009, 6:23:06 PM2/22/09
to
On Sun, 22 Feb 2009 22:07:58 +0000, A.Lee wrote:

> No, flame failure is rare on hobs. That's why 22mm pipe is used for gas
> nowadays, when a big boiler kicks in, it could suck up enough of the gas
> in a pipe, that a lit burner on a hob temporarily goes out as gas flow
> is reduced so much, the gas flow would resume fairly quickly, but it
> wouldnt be lit.

Oh dear :-(

The size of the pipe is related by simple arithmetic[1] to the gas
consumption of the appliances served. For a combi boiler a certain amount
of 22mm pipework is likely to be involved unless the boiler is less than a
metre (effectively[2]) from the meter[3].


> Separate gas pipes to the cooker and boiler usually solve this, as well
> as the bigger bore pipes now required on boilers.

Who's been listening to Doctor D? FFS if you're going to go that route do
it properly and run separate pipelines through the Ukraine back to Russia :-)

[1] what us boring old farts called O-level: now known as a first class
degree, apparently ;-)


[2] where the effect of a sharp 90 degree bend is equivalent to half a
metre of pipe


[3] thank $DEITY for our rightpondian difference of spelling between the
metric unit of length and a device for measuring

--
John Stumbles -- http://yaph.co.uk

I used to be indecisive but now I'm not so sure

The Medway Handyman

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Feb 22, 2009, 7:14:38 PM2/22/09
to
meow...@care2.com wrote:
> The Medway Handyman wrote:
>> peterm...@googlemail.com wrote:
>>> The New World seventy-six cooker I have needs the taps / knobs
>>> lubricating - I saw something on a previous post suggesting gss cock
>>> grease. Is this the stuff, and is it straightforward to dismantle
>>> and re-grease them? A gas engineer I spoke to muttered darkly about
>>> carbon monoxide and said any engineer would charge ?100 to come out

>>> and then slap a condemned label on it to cover himself. I like the
>>> cooker but like life more - should I think of scrapping it for
>>> safety?
>>
>> 50+ years old?
>>
>> I'd get rid of the bloody thing as soon as possible, before it kills
>> you.
>
> I cant think of anything about a modern cooker that a 1950s one doesnt
> have,

Other than 50 years wear.

Fred

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Feb 22, 2009, 7:44:53 PM2/22/09
to

My biggest concern is the yellow flame. It is indicative of a incorrect
air/gas mixture. If you've opened the air inlet screw wide open, the next
thing you can look at is the burner. I guess it's made of cast iron in
which case you'll probably find rust has closed the gaps to restrict the
flow of mixture leaving the burner. The offending burners should be removed
and the slots cleared. You might also find the slots are coated with dried
household cleaners.

I'm sure some here would frown, but generally if you have a blue flame,
you've got complete combustion with little or no carbon monoxide being
generated.


Rod

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Feb 23, 2009, 3:27:02 AM2/23/09
to
YAPH wrote:
> On Sun, 22 Feb 2009 13:24:14 -0800, meow2222 wrote:
>
>> I cant think of anything about a modern cooker that a 1950s one doesnt
>> have, other than insulation in the oven cavity wall. Just as safe.
>
> Flame failure device, in the oven at least and increasingly nowadays on
> the burners too (mandatory in blocks of flats).
>
> Plus taps and regulators that are designed for higher pressure NG (aka
> North Sea gas) rather than ancient Town Gas.
>

Thanks for confirming what I thought about flame failure devices.

However the taps and regulators must have been acceptable at NG
pressures when the conversion was done. (Would the regulator have been
changed at conversion time? If so, then it would even be designed for NG.)

Doctor Drivel

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Feb 23, 2009, 4:13:17 AM2/23/09
to

"YAPH" <use...@yaph.co.uk> wrote in message
news:70e52qF...@mid.individual.net...

> On Sun, 22 Feb 2009 22:07:58 +0000, A.Lee wrote:
>
>> No, flame failure is rare on hobs. That's why 22mm pipe is used for gas
>> nowadays, when a big boiler kicks in, it could suck up enough of the gas
>> in a pipe, that a lit burner on a hob temporarily goes out as gas flow
>> is reduced so much, the gas flow would resume fairly quickly, but it
>> wouldnt be lit.
>
> Oh dear :-(
>
> The size of the pipe is related by simple arithmetic[1] to the gas
> consumption of the appliances served. For a combi boiler a certain amount
> of 22mm pipework is likely to be involved

On many combis 28mm gas pipe is involved as well.

> unless the boiler is less than a
> metre (effectively[2]) from the meter[3].
>
>> Separate gas pipes to the cooker and boiler usually solve this, as well
>> as the bigger bore pipes now required on boilers.
>
> Who's been listening to Doctor D?

He is half right. He is right on having a separate gas supply to boiler
from the meter. It is clear your experience of these matters is limited
indeed. Listen to people who know more than you.....and learn and then do
as they say. Then you will not have any come-backs.

Doctor Drivel

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Feb 23, 2009, 4:14:53 AM2/23/09
to

"YAPH" <use...@yaph.co.uk> wrote in message
news:70e4ifF...@mid.individual.net...

> On Sun, 22 Feb 2009 13:24:14 -0800, meow2222 wrote:
>
>> I cant think of anything about a modern cooker that a 1950s one doesnt
>> have, other than insulation in the oven cavity wall. Just as safe.
>
> Flame failure device, in the oven at least and increasingly nowadays on
> the burners too (mandatory in blocks of flats).
>
> Plus taps and regulators that are designed for higher pressure NG (aka
> North Sea gas) rather than ancient Town Gas.

Not an issue as it has been converted. The taps themselves were rarely and
issue when converting appliances.

Doctor Drivel

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Feb 23, 2009, 4:01:22 AM2/23/09
to

<peterm...@googlemail.com> wrote in message
news:7ab1f934-f540-4d4e...@a12g2000yqm.googlegroups.com...

The New World seventy-six cooker I have needs the taps / knobs
lubricating
<<<<<<<<<

Use graphite grease. Remove the barrel and clean with a light wire wool.
Look inside tap housing and clean off any accumulated crud.

Doctor Drivel

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Feb 23, 2009, 4:05:34 AM2/23/09
to

"ARWadsworth" <adamwa...@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
news:DXjol.38612$Sp5....@text.news.virginmedia.com...
> It might work with town gas if needed to.

By changing the injectors and burners and sometimes the burner tubes.

Doctor Drivel

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Feb 23, 2009, 4:20:55 AM2/23/09
to

"YAPH" <use...@yaph.co.uk> wrote in message
news:70e52qF...@mid.individual.net...

> On Sun, 22 Feb 2009 22:07:58 +0000, A.Lee wrote:
>
>> No, flame failure is rare on hobs. That's why 22mm pipe is used for gas
>> nowadays, when a big boiler kicks in, it could suck up enough of the gas
>> in a pipe, that a lit burner on a hob temporarily goes out as gas flow
>> is reduced so much, the gas flow would resume fairly quickly, but it
>> wouldnt be lit.
>
> Oh dear :-(
>
> The size of the pipe is related by simple arithmetic[1] to the gas
> consumption of the appliances served. For a combi boiler a certain amount
> of 22mm pipework is likely to be involved

On many combis 28mm gas pipe is involved as well.

> unless the boiler is less than a


> metre (effectively[2]) from the meter[3].
>
>> Separate gas pipes to the cooker and boiler usually solve this, as well
>> as the bigger bore pipes now required on boilers.
>
> Who's been listening to Doctor D?

He is half right. He is right on having a separate gas supply to boiler
from the meter. With many high gas consumption boilers being fitted, here
can be a surge on the gas mains at peak times. Also, a meter regulator
could be slow in reacting. A separate gas supply to a boiler can eliminate
any small adverse effects of a sticking or poor quality meter regulator.
Having a dedicated gas supply for the boiler can reduce or eliminate any
effects.

meow...@care2.com

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Feb 23, 2009, 4:37:16 AM2/23/09
to
Rod wrote:
> YAPH wrote:
> > On Sun, 22 Feb 2009 13:24:14 -0800, meow2222 wrote:
> >
> >> I cant think of anything about a modern cooker that a 1950s one doesnt
> >> have, other than insulation in the oven cavity wall. Just as safe.
> >
> > Flame failure device, in the oven at least and increasingly nowadays on
> > the burners too (mandatory in blocks of flats).
> >
> > Plus taps and regulators that are designed for higher pressure NG (aka
> > North Sea gas) rather than ancient Town Gas.
> >
>
> Thanks for confirming what I thought about flame failure devices.
>
> However the taps and regulators must have been acceptable at NG
> pressures when the conversion was done. (Would the regulator have been
> changed at conversion time? If so, then it would even be designed for NG.)

Didnt know they'd have a reg built in.


NT

Doctor Drivel

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Feb 23, 2009, 7:46:50 AM2/23/09
to

<meow...@care2.com> wrote in message
news:f0789159-8b04-4d80...@b16g2000yqb.googlegroups.com...

I think he means an appliance governor. The old town gas appliances had
them. They were not required for natural gas as one was installed on the
meter, which under town gas there was none. The old appliance governors
were removed or a blanking plate installed in them.

PM

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Feb 23, 2009, 8:51:58 AM2/23/09
to
Rod wrote:
> The Medway Handyman wrote:
>> peterm...@googlemail.com wrote:
>>> The New World seventy-six cooker I have needs the taps / knobs
>>> lubricating - I saw something on a previous post suggesting gss cock
>>> grease. Is this the stuff, and is it straightforward to dismantle
>>> and re-grease them? A gas engineer I spoke to muttered darkly about
>>> carbon monoxide and said any engineer would charge ?100 to come out

>>> and then slap a condemned label on it to cover himself. I like the
>>> cooker but like life more - should I think of scrapping it for
>>> safety?
>>
>> 50+ years old?
>>
>> I'd get rid of the bloody thing as soon as possible, before it kills
>> you.
>>
>>
> Age, of itself, doesn't make something dangerous, does it?

Apart from pancake mix.
http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/pancake.asp


YAPH

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Feb 23, 2009, 9:15:24 AM2/23/09
to
On Mon, 23 Feb 2009 09:14:53 +0000, Doctor Drivel wrote:

> Not an issue as it has been converted. The taps themselves were rarely
> and issue when converting appliances.

Nah, they simply left the old taps in place so you had to carefully
manipulate these through about a quarter of their full travel to control
burner flames under the higher pressure NG.

--
John Stumbles -- http://yaph.co.uk

87.5% of statistics are made up

YAPH

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Feb 23, 2009, 9:18:01 AM2/23/09
to
On Mon, 23 Feb 2009 09:20:55 +0000, Doctor Drivel wrote:

> He is half right. He is right on having a separate gas supply to boiler
> from the meter. With many high gas consumption boilers being fitted,
> here can be a surge on the gas mains at peak times. Also, a meter
> regulator could be slow in reacting. A separate gas supply to a boiler
> can eliminate any small adverse effects of a sticking or poor quality
> meter regulator.

Not if your separate feed from the meter still goes through the same
regulator which is on the supply side of the meter. You'd need separate
meters, each with its own regulator, to avoid that.

--
John Stumbles -- http://yaph.co.uk

Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus
and Pop Psychologists are from Uranus

Doctor Drivel

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Feb 23, 2009, 10:06:23 AM2/23/09
to

"YAPH" <use...@yaph.co.uk> wrote in message
news:70fpbsF...@mid.individual.net...

> On Mon, 23 Feb 2009 09:14:53 +0000, Doctor Drivel wrote:
>
>> Not an issue as it has been converted. The taps themselves were rarely
>> and issue when converting appliances.
>
> Nah, they simply left the old taps in place so you had to carefully
> manipulate these through about a quarter of their full travel to control
> burner flames under the higher pressure NG.

The new burner tubes, burners and adjustment catered for that.

Doctor Drivel

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Feb 23, 2009, 10:12:42 AM2/23/09
to

"YAPH" <use...@yaph.co.uk> wrote in message
news:70fpgpF...@mid.individual.net...

> On Mon, 23 Feb 2009 09:20:55 +0000, Doctor Drivel wrote:
>
>> He is half right. He is right on having a separate gas supply to boiler
>> from the meter. With many high gas consumption boilers being fitted,
>> here can be a surge on the gas mains at peak times. Also, a meter
>> regulator could be slow in reacting. A separate gas supply to a boiler
>> can eliminate any small adverse effects of a sticking or poor quality
>> meter regulator.
>
> Not if your separate feed from the meter still goes through the same
> regulator which is on the supply side of the meter. You'd need separate
> meters, each with its own regulator, to avoid that.

The separate pipe gives a small buffer of gas inside the supply pipe from
the meter. If all on one pipe and the gas fire and cooker are on, and the
boiler kicks in there is no buffer. That is enough to stop a glitch in a
modern pre-mix burner.

I have seen it when a boiler was switched in and the cooker burner nearly
went out. Yet the calcs were all correct when running off one pipe.

It is a case of divide and rule. "Always" have a dedicated boiler gas
supply pipe.

Rod

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Feb 23, 2009, 10:27:43 AM2/23/09
to
PM wrote:

> Rod wrote:
<>
>> Age, of itself, doesn't make something dangerous, does it?
>
> Apart from pancake mix.
> http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/pancake.asp
>
>
What a timely post. :-)

Being uk.d-i-y, we'd better not be using packet mixes anyway - fresh
buckwheat flour, eggs, milk, warm water and salt for us tomorrow.

<http://foodlorists.blogspot.com/2007/01/buckwheat-pancakes-or-galette-bretonne.html>

(Never tried this recipe before, but needing to avoid wheat for partner... )

YAPH

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Feb 23, 2009, 12:18:30 PM2/23/09
to
On Mon, 23 Feb 2009 15:06:23 +0000, Doctor Drivel wrote:

> The new burner tubes, burners and adjustment catered for that.

Not on any of the converted appliances I had the pleasure of using, and
it's hard to see how they could since it's the bore of the taps themselves
that determines how much of the gas gets through.

--
John Stumbles -- http://yaph.co.uk

Ohnosecond
Instant in time when you realise that you've just made a BIG mistake.

Ed Sirett

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Feb 23, 2009, 2:41:01 PM2/23/09
to
On Sun, 22 Feb 2009 10:08:21 -0800, petermeakins wrote:

> The New World seventy-six cooker I have needs the taps / knobs
> lubricating - I saw something on a previous post suggesting gss cock
> grease. Is this the stuff, and is it straightforward to dismantle and
> re-grease them? A gas engineer I spoke to muttered darkly about carbon

> monoxide and said any engineer would charge £100 to come out and then


> slap a condemned label on it to cover himself. I like the cooker but

> like life more - should I think of scrapping it for safety? The flame on


> one burner was a little yellow, to I closed what I took to be an air
> inlet screw on the cast iron pipe leading to it - this improved it but
> even fully tightened the flame is still a little yellow. Would re-
> greasing the taps help this - and should I be in there at all? Thanks
> for advice.
> Peter

There is a New world cooker in a flat a couple of doors away. It is in
better health than me and about the same age. I usually get to the do
the Landlords' inspection. I am determined to keep this appliance in safe
working order.

Clearly the oven let alone any other burners don't have flame failure,
therefore the cooker is "not to current standards"! (Frankly it's better
than a notionally compliant brand new "B*ko" from C*met et sim.).

A few years ago I did re-grease all the taps using a tiny amount of gas
cock grease. More recently I repainted the numbers on the Regulo. I did
remove the mini gas poker from the side a few years ago. Peizo or Piezo-
gas lighters weren't widely available when it was made and there were a
lot of ways that gadget could make trouble.

If you have yellow tinged flames on any of the burners then you will need
to eliminate the problem.
Jet worn? Jet blocked? Mixing tube dirty inside? Aeration settings wrong?
Holes in burner (especially over) partly blocked? Wrong gas pressure.
If in doubt get an experienced pro.

--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk
Gas fitting FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/GasFitting.html
Sealed CH FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/SealedCH.html
Choosing a Boiler FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/BoilerChoice.html

Ed Sirett

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Feb 23, 2009, 2:43:15 PM2/23/09
to
On Mon, 23 Feb 2009 17:18:30 +0000, YAPH wrote:

> On Mon, 23 Feb 2009 15:06:23 +0000, Doctor Drivel wrote:
>
>> The new burner tubes, burners and adjustment catered for that.
>
> Not on any of the converted appliances I had the pleasure of using, and
> it's hard to see how they could since it's the bore of the taps
> themselves that determines how much of the gas gets through.

At the full rate the limiting factor will definitely be the injector
rathe than the tap. The difficulty comes trying to set a simmer rate.

YAPH

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Feb 23, 2009, 3:55:02 PM2/23/09
to
On Mon, 23 Feb 2009 19:41:01 +0000, Ed Sirett wrote:

> There is a New world cooker in a flat a couple of doors away. It is in
> better health than me and about the same age. I usually get to the do
> the Landlords' inspection. I am determined to keep this appliance in
> safe working order.
>
> Clearly the oven let alone any other burners don't have flame failure,
> therefore the cooker is "not to current standards"! (Frankly it's better
> than a notionally compliant brand new "B*ko" from C*met et sim.).

I too have NCS-ed but otherwise passed an elderly cast-iron cooker for a
friend. And all 3 of us are probably about the same age!


--
John Stumbles -- http://yaph.co.uk

A: Because it messes up the order in which people read text.
Q: Why is top-posting a bad thing?

peterm...@googlemail.com

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Feb 23, 2009, 5:52:05 PM2/23/09
to
> The FAQ for uk.diy is athttp://www.diyfaq.org.uk

Thanks Ed and John,
Pleased to hear there are other cast iron geriactrics still lighting
up out there! Advice was very useful - I will follow up and if in any
trouble call someone who knows - or if you are anywhere near Brighton
tommorrow please drop by for an unregulated pancake! Do you know if
parts can be had for ancient cookers such as this?
best,
Peter

Doctor Drivel

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Feb 23, 2009, 7:16:33 PM2/23/09
to

"YAPH" <use...@yaph.co.uk> wrote in message
news:70g436F...@mid.individual.net...

> On Mon, 23 Feb 2009 15:06:23 +0000, Doctor Drivel wrote:
>
>> The new burner tubes, burners and adjustment catered for that.
>
> Not on any of the converted appliances I had the pleasure of using, and
> it's hard to see how they could since it's the bore of the taps themselves
> that determines how much of the gas gets through.

The injectors determined that. Where the taps were hopeless many of them
were changed on conversion.

Ed Sirett

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Feb 24, 2009, 1:54:08 PM2/24/09
to
On Mon, 23 Feb 2009 14:52:05 -0800, petermeakins wrote:

Almost certainly not.
However the only parts that can wear out are the Regulo, the injectors
and gas cocks.
The gas cocks are serviceable with care.
The injectors should be replaceable but the only reason would be if the
gas rate exceeded 105% of nominal.
The Regulo would be game-over though.

--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.

The FAQ for uk.diy is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk

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