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Re: People drinking less ..

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Fredxx

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Feb 15, 2024, 6:52:44 AMFeb 15
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On 15/02/2024 10:48, Jethro_uk wrote:
> Because of the price, amongst other factors.
>
> Would have thought there would be a surge in homebrewing ?
>
> (Posted by someone who has home distilled for 17 years ...)

Is this in the freezer type of concentrating or a genuine still?

I'm very wary of distilling a flammable liquid that has a history of
deaths and explosions!

Rod Speed

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Feb 15, 2024, 11:38:28 AMFeb 15
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Fredxx <fre...@spam.invalid> wrote
> Jethro_uk wrote

>> Because of the price, amongst other factors.

>> Would have thought there would be a surge in homebrewing ?

Presumably there has been but its not trivial to do.

>> (Posted by someone who has home distilled for 17 years ...)

More than 20 for me and beer and cider too.

> Is this in the freezer type of concentrating or a genuine still?

Genuine still in my case.

> I'm very wary of distilling a flammable liquid that has a history of
> deaths

No it does not in the first world. That only happens
in the 3rd world where the worst of them deliberately
sell methanol instead of ethanol because its cheaper.

> and explosions!

Can't happen.

Peeler

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Feb 15, 2024, 11:47:38 AMFeb 15
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On Fri, 16 Feb 2024 03:38:19 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
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JNugent

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Feb 15, 2024, 12:14:48 PMFeb 15
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On 15/02/2024 04:48, Jethro_uk wrote:

> Because of the price, amongst other factors.
>
> Would have thought there would be a surge in homebrewing ?
>
> (Posted by someone who has home distilled for 17 years ...)

The popularity of home brewing (and wine-making) has been up and down
over the decades.

Fredxx

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Feb 15, 2024, 1:48:38 PMFeb 15
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Of course it can't happen:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_QYN7EDVTGA

And you say you're subject is chemistry? Sheesh

Sam Plusnet

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Feb 15, 2024, 2:14:26 PMFeb 15
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When I took it up (many years back), it was because I knew people who
already did it so I had examples (and advice) to follow.

If the numbers involved in home brewing has declined too far, people
will not see it as a possible option.

--
Sam Plusnet

Rod Speed

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Feb 15, 2024, 3:49:34 PMFeb 15
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There is nothing even remotely like that with a STILL, fuckwit.

Rod Speed

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Feb 15, 2024, 3:52:09 PMFeb 15
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Donf believe that with the internet so common now.

JNugent

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Feb 15, 2024, 4:01:18 PMFeb 15
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:-)

Some might say that being offered a taste of someone's home brew will
deter them from trying it for themselves.
>

Rod Speed

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Feb 15, 2024, 4:43:45 PMFeb 15
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Never happened with any of mine.

Peeler

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Feb 15, 2024, 4:46:43 PMFeb 15
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Peeler

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Feb 15, 2024, 4:47:18 PMFeb 15
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Fredxx

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Feb 15, 2024, 5:05:40 PMFeb 15
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So?? Next you'll be saying 'it can't happen'.

Yes, of course it couldn't possibly happen:

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2011/jul/14/inferno-moonshine-liquor-factory-five-dead

Peeler

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Feb 15, 2024, 5:21:34 PMFeb 15
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JNugent

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Feb 15, 2024, 6:01:28 PMFeb 15
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Yours must be better than any of the home brew I've ever been offered.
Message has been deleted

Rod Speed

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Feb 15, 2024, 7:39:06 PMFeb 15
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Fredxx <fre...@spam.invalid> wrote
> Rod Speed wrote
>> Fredxx <fre...@spam.invalid> wrote
>>> Rod Speed wrote
>>>> Fredxx <fre...@spam.invalid> wrote
>>>>> Jethro_uk wrote

>>>>>> Because of the price, amongst other factors.

>>>>>> Would have thought there would be a surge in homebrewing ?

>>>> Presumably there has been but its not trivial to do.

>>>>>> (Posted by someone who has home distilled for 17 years ...)

>>>> More than 20 for me and beer and cider too.

>>>>> Is this in the freezer type of concentrating or a genuine still?

>>>> Genuine still in my case.

>>>>> I'm very wary of distilling a flammableliquid that has a history
>>>>> of deaths

>>>> No it does not in the first world. That only happens
>>>> in the 3rd world where the worst of them deliberately
>>>> sell methanol instead of ethanol because its cheaper.

>>>>> and explosions!

>>>> Can't happen.

>>> Of course it can't happen:

>>> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_QYN7EDVTGA

>> There is nothing even remotely like that with a STILL, fuckwit.

> So??

So, given that there is nothing even remotely like that
with a STILL, it isnt going to happen with a STILL, fuckwit.

Next you'll be saying 'it can't happen'.

> Yes, of course it couldn't possibly happen:

> https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2011/jul/14/inferno-moonshine-liquor-factory-five-dead

Thats not an EXPLOSION, fuckwit.

Rod Speed

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Feb 15, 2024, 7:40:41 PMFeb 15
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JNugent <jennings&c...@mail.com> wrote
> Rod Speed wrote
>> JNugent <jennings&c...@mail.com> wrote
>>> Sam Plusnet wrote
>>>> JNugent wrote
>>>>> Jethro_uk wrote

>>>>>> Because of the price, amongst other factors.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Would have thought there would be a surge in homebrewing ?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> (Posted by someone who has home distilled for 17 years ...)
>>>>>
>>>>> The popularity of home brewing (and wine-making) has been up and down
>>>>> over the decades.
>>>>
>>>> When I took it up (many years back), it was because I knew people who
>>>> already did it so I had examples (and advice) to follow.
>>>>
>>>> If the numbers involved in home brewing has declined too far, people
>>>> will not see it as a possible option.
>>>
>>> :-)
>>>
>>> Some might say that being offered a taste of someone's home brew will
>>> deter them from trying it for themselves.
>>
>> Never happened with any of mine.
>
> Yours must be better than any of the home brew I've ever been offered.

Yes they are.

Peeler

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Feb 16, 2024, 2:37:51 AMFeb 16
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and the end of prick is only clear because you are such a Wanker."
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Peeler

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Feb 16, 2024, 2:38:09 AMFeb 16
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On Fri, 16 Feb 2024 11:40:32 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent

Paul

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Feb 16, 2024, 6:08:22 AMFeb 16
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On 2/16/2024 4:23 AM, Ottavio Caruso wrote:
> How do you make wine at home? I mean real wine, not Lambrini.
>

Depends what you mean by wine.

We have a wine-making store here, and at harvest time, flats
of wine-making grapes are available, if you want to make
wine directly from grapes.

You can also get wine concentrate, which takes the labour of
dealing with grapes out of the equation. You can think of that
as "quality control".

It involves a good sized room, carboys, one-way valve on top for
fermentation exhaust to exit through. Then there's some
sort of gadget for measuring the "done-ness" (refractometer?).

https://blog.homebrewing.org/wine-refractometer-alcohol-tester/

But it all looks like a colossal bore to me, because the wine
you get from that, is not going to match your favourite vintage
you might have picked up at the store.

You can also make things at home, you are more likely to savour,
rather than guzzle.

There are other potential steps in wine-making, but the
people I've known doing it, they don't bother with this.

https://homebrewing.org/pages/wine-making-adding-oak-to-your-homemade-wines

A typical homemade wine, you'd probably drink all of it, within
a couple years of making it. You don't leave that stuff
in your "wine cellar". You might try something like this to
make it palatable longer.

https://blog.homebrewing.org/adding-sulfites-to-homemade-wine/

If the result does not taste like furniture polish or turps,
you're doing good :-)

No, I've never made wine. It's just too much work.

Paul

Smolley

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Feb 16, 2024, 9:30:57 AMFeb 16
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On Fri, 16 Feb 2024 14:15:23 +0000, Ottavio Caruso wrote:

> Am 16/02/2024 um 11:08 schrieb Paul:
>> Depends what you mean by wine.
>
> Wine is an industrial product. You don't "brew" wine. Whatever that
> store sells, it's not wine.

Vinegar

maus

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Feb 16, 2024, 10:34:58 AMFeb 16
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People are polite.

--
grey...@mail.com
Is There not even one Influencer here to torment?

maus

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Feb 16, 2024, 11:37:06 AMFeb 16
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On 2024-02-16, maus <ma...@deb2.org> wrote:
> On 2024-02-15, Rod Speed <rod.sp...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Fri, 16 Feb 2024 08:01:11 +1100, JNugent <jennings&c...@mail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> On 15/02/2024 13:14, Sam Plusnet wrote:
>>>> On 15-Feb-24 17:14, JNugent wrote:
>>>>> On 15/02/2024 04:48, Jethro_uk wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Because of the price, amongst other factors.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Would have thought there would be a surge in homebrewing ?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> (Posted by someone who has home distilled for 17 years ...)
>>>>>
>>>>> The popularity of home brewing (and wine-making) has been up and down
>>>>> over the decades.
>>>>
>> Never happened with any of mine.
>
> People are polite.

To be serious.

There are secrets to beer making, and the most important, IMHO, is
cleanliness. Everything sealed from outside air, ubends, all. My late
wife made it (non-alcoholic), her friend, and my son,

Rod Speed

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Feb 16, 2024, 12:08:30 PMFeb 16
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These aren't. I had to refuse to make their beer.
I told them that I would teach them how to make
their own, but I wasnt going to make it for them.

JNugent

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Feb 16, 2024, 12:29:28 PMFeb 16
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On 16/02/2024 03:23, Ottavio Caruso wrote:

> Am 15/02/2024 um 17:14 schrieb JNugent:
> How do you make wine at home? I mean real wine, not Lambrini.

I believe that it is usual to use either grapes or substances derived
from that fruit.

I have also heard of various wines made from parts of plants usual
regarded as flowering plants. The one that springs readily to mind is
elderberry.

Quite a few years back (when a bottle of Bordeaux was still priced at
under a pound in the UK), we used to make wine. We had all the
equipment. But I didn't care for the finished product and we ceased
production.

Peeler

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Feb 16, 2024, 12:38:39 PMFeb 16
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On Sat, 17 Feb 2024 04:08:22 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent

Joe

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Feb 16, 2024, 1:39:55 PMFeb 16
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On Sat, 17 Feb 2024 04:08:22 +1100
Give a man a fish...

...and he'll be back in the same place the next day waiting for *his*
fish.

--
Joe

Joe

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Feb 16, 2024, 1:57:52 PMFeb 16
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On Fri, 16 Feb 2024 11:29:23 -0600
JNugent <jennings&c...@mail.com> wrote:

> On 16/02/2024 03:23, Ottavio Caruso wrote:
>
> > Am 15/02/2024 um 17:14 schrieb JNugent:
> >> On 15/02/2024 04:48, Jethro_uk wrote:
> >>
> >>> Because of the price, amongst other factors.
> >>>
> >>> Would have thought there would be a surge in homebrewing ?
> >>>
> >>> (Posted by someone who has home distilled for 17 years ...)
> >>
> >> The popularity of home brewing (and wine-making) has been up and
> >> down over the decades.
> >
> > How do you make wine at home? I mean real wine, not Lambrini.
>
> I believe that it is usual to use either grapes or substances derived
> from that fruit.
>
> I have also heard of various wines made from parts of plants usual
> regarded as flowering plants. The one that springs readily to mind is
> elderberry.

Also, oddly, stinging nettles. We made some from our own rhubarb and
sugar, which when fermented, would probably have etched glass. The
fruit itself was too sour to eat without a lot of sugar. So we left it,
and after three or four years tried it again, when it was reasonably
good.
>
> Quite a few years back (when a bottle of Bordeaux was still priced at
> under a pound in the UK), we used to make wine. We had all the
> equipment. But I didn't care for the finished product and we ceased
> production.

We tried making 'proper' wines from grape juice, but could never make
anything approaching the real thing. However, grape juice and fruit
juice produced some pleasant drinks. We had one grape and orange
fermentation 'stick', it just stopped fermenting and we couldn't make it
start again. So we stuck it in bottles, a rather sweet, weak drink, and
again forgot it.

One day, under the stairs, there was an odd, orangey smell. One of the
corks had blown out of the bottle, and a couple of others were partway
out. So I wired all the corks down and we left them another couple of
months, the opened our first orange Champagne. One of the others, when
I removed the wire, fired the cork about ten feet in the air (I opened
them outside in case of serious frothing).

But yes, too much trouble for what we got out of it.

--
Joe

SteveW

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Feb 17, 2024, 5:14:02 AMFeb 17
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On 17/02/2024 09:26, Ottavio Caruso wrote:
> Am 16/02/2024 um 17:29 schrieb JNugent:
>>
>> I believe that it is usual to use either grapes or substances derived
>> from that fruit.
>
> Wine is not grape juice. You need to ferment the wort and you can't do
> it at home or in a cellar. You need climate-controlled large areas to do
> that and they cost millions.

Wine has been around for millenia - well before climate controlled,
commercial operations. It is more arguable whether the modern stuff is
real wine.

JNugent

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Feb 17, 2024, 1:32:55 PMFeb 17
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On 17/02/2024 03:26, Ottavio Caruso wrote:

> Am 16/02/2024 um 17:29 schrieb JNugent:
>>
>> I believe that it is usual to use either grapes or substances derived
>> from that fruit.
>
> Wine is not grape juice.

REALLY?

Who knew?

[Yes, that was mild sarcasm.]

> You need to ferment the wort and you can't do
> it at home or in a cellar. You need climate-controlled large areas to do
> that and they cost millions.

Nevertheless, plenty of people make wine at home. They must find it
palatable. I didn't.

alan_m

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Feb 18, 2024, 2:54:25 AMFeb 18
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Does modern wine or beer have much to do with that produced more than a
100 to 200 years ago? Historically beer was drunk because it was safer
that the water - in times before they realised that boiling water would
make the water safe. But did the beer taste the same to our
sophisticated taste buds of today? I very much doubt. Brewed from the
local river water and possible to a much higher ABV so it could be
watered down before serving. Very cloudy (no clear glass pint
containers) and possible without the use of hops. No real hygiene
standards and frequent yeast contamination. Each batch probably tasted
different.

--
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Rod Speed

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Feb 18, 2024, 3:36:34 AMFeb 18
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On Sun, 18 Feb 2024 18:54:19 +1100, alan_m <ju...@admac.myzen.co.uk> wrote:

> On 17/02/2024 10:13, SteveW wrote:
>> On 17/02/2024 09:26, Ottavio Caruso wrote:
>>> Am 16/02/2024 um 17:29 schrieb JNugent:
>>>>
>>>> I believe that it is usual to use either grapes or substances derived
>>>> from that fruit.
>>>
>>> Wine is not grape juice. You need to ferment the wort and you can't do
>>> it at home or in a cellar. You need climate-controlled large areas to
>>> do that and they cost millions.
>> Wine has been around for millenia - well before climate controlled,
>> commercial operations. It is more arguable whether the modern stuff is
>> real wine.

> Does modern wine or beer have much to do with that produced more than a
> 100 to 200 years ago?

Both do.

> Historically beer was drunk because it was safer that the water - in
> times before they realised that boiling water would make the water safe.
> But did the beer taste the same to our sophisticated taste buds of
> today? I very much doubt.

It does anyway with the best of the older beers.

> Brewed from the local river water

Mine still is, tho the local river water is chlorinated and filtered.

> and possible to a much higher ABV soit could be watered down before
> serving.

Fantasy.

> Very cloudy (no clear glass pint containers)

Nothing to do with the container.

> and possible without the use of hops.

There are various types of beers.

> No real hygiene standards

Who needs standards ?

> and frequent yeast contamination.Each batch probably tasted different.

Fantasy.

Peeler

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Feb 18, 2024, 4:04:46 AMFeb 18
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On Sun, 18 Feb 2024 19:36:23 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
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The Natural Philosopher

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Feb 18, 2024, 4:18:47 AMFeb 18
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I think it was fairly low alcohol, as people are recorded to have drunk
gallons of the stuff at a time.

Hop free certainly in the middle ages, but I think there was drive to
get it consistent.

No reason to be cloudy, if left to settle

--
When plunder becomes a way of life for a group of men in a society, over
the course of time they create for themselves a legal system that
authorizes it and a moral code that glorifies it.

Frédéric Bastiat

alan_m

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Feb 18, 2024, 4:53:59 AMFeb 18
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On 18/02/2024 08:36, Rod Speed wrote:

>> and frequent yeast contamination.Each batch probably tasted  different.
>
> Fantasy.

As its still a potential problem with modern brewing pray tell how they
avoided it in the past.

alan_m

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Feb 18, 2024, 5:16:58 AMFeb 18
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In my experience a lot of people who home brew, wine or beer, attempt to
get the ABV too high and for me a beer with a decent taste without too
high an alcoholic kick is pleasant but as soon as the alcohol dominates
it becomes more unpleasant.

In the UK and for people of a certain age I think the experience with
home brewing beer comes from those kits which used to be on sale. They
often mimicked some of the mediocre brands of the time and produced a
very malty beer (which is style I don't particularly like).

Paul

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Feb 18, 2024, 5:28:45 AMFeb 18
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On 2/18/2024 4:53 AM, alan_m wrote:
> On 18/02/2024 08:36, Rod Speed wrote:
>
>>> and frequent yeast contamination.Each batch probably tasted  different.
>>
>> Fantasy.
>
> As its still a potential problem with modern brewing pray tell how they avoided it in the past.
>

For home brew beer, you "decant" while serving.

This leaves any debris at the bottom of the bottle, in the bottle.

An experienced home-brewer, will serve your pint, decant slowly
(not tip the bottle over and let it "glug"), and then the silt
at the bottom, you don't serve that to your visitor.

Obviously, home brew beer is missing some steps.

Commercial beer is filtered and pasteurized.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/B9780128152584000135

"After maturation, most of beers are filtered and pasteurized. Such processes
aim to purify the beer, clarify, and reduce total microorganism count.
Filtration with diatomaceous earth (DE) and pasteurization (slow or fast)
are usually performed."

The "fast" refers to flash pasteurization. The commercial beer industry,
shares tech discoveries with the dairy industry.

Craft beer ? No idea. Craft beer ls like commercial beer,
but it's on a smaller scale, and "it's actually beer" :-)
A craft beer doesn't usually taste like commercial swill.
But commercial swill is very consistent. Exactly the same yellow piss
from one bottle to the next.

Paul

alan_m

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Feb 18, 2024, 5:49:37 AMFeb 18
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On 18/02/2024 10:28, Paul wrote:

>
> Commercial beer is filtered and pasteurized.

Some of it is pasteurised in the UK especially by some of the USA
brewery owners but a lot of beer sold in the UK (under the general
banner of "real ale") is not pasteurised and is still a living and
changeable) product whilst in the cask.


> Craft beer ? No idea. Craft beer ls like commercial beer,
> but it's on a smaller scale, and "it's actually beer" :-)
> A craft beer doesn't usually taste like commercial swill.
> But commercial swill is very consistent. Exactly the same yellow piss
> from one bottle to the next.

+1

SteveW

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Feb 18, 2024, 9:56:07 AMFeb 18
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On 18/02/2024 11:16, Jethro_uk wrote:
> When I home brewed, I settled on a "Canadian Blond" from Coopers. A kit
> that made 40 litres. They had quite a range.
>
> There were 3 home brew shops within a 30 minute drive back in 2017. One
> went bust in 2017 because he was a nob (as soon as I saw a brand new van
> in their car park, I knew they would go bust). One close in 2019 as the
> landlord wanted the premises back after 30 years and they wanted to
> retire. And the last and nearest went bust in 2020.
>
> All of them had the raw ingredients for the real nerd to make their own
> wort from scratch, etc, etc. I would have though such shops would be a
> source of fascination to the average uk.d-i-y-er

One shop on Gorsey Lane, in Warrington, used to be half plumbing and
half brewing - I always thought it was an invitation to make your own
copper still.

> I stopped brewing because at a single pint a day, it was a lot of faff.
> And then I removed that from my diet to enjoy spirits more :)
>
> For wine, we take 4 days to finish a bottle - we just have a small glass
> with dinner - so the faff of making your own isn't worth the effort.
>
> If we were more sociable, it might make more sense.
>
> Also I like cold, lager type beers. Which means an extra step of bottling
> (unless you go OTT and build a kegirator) whereas aley types can leave a
> barrel on a counter and just pour from that.

My son and his fellow students, recently made a variety of ciders and meads.

Rod Speed

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Feb 18, 2024, 12:30:11 PMFeb 18
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alan_m <ju...@admac.myzen.co.uk> wrote
> Rod Speed wrote

>>> and frequent yeast contamination.Each batch probably tasted different.

>> Fantasy.

> As its still a potential problem with modern brewing pray tell how they
> avoided it in the past.

That was a comment on the last sentence.

That doesnt happen even if you are careless about contamination.

Rod Speed

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Feb 18, 2024, 12:47:14 PMFeb 18
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Paul <nos...@needed.invalid> wrote
> alan_m wrote
>> Rod Speed wrote

>>>> and frequent yeast contamination.

>>>> Each batch probably tasted different.

>>> Fantasy.

>> As its still a potential problem with modern brewing pray tell how they
>> avoided it in the past.

> For home brew beer, you "decant" while serving.

That's not what he is talking about, he's talking about
wild yeast getting into the fermenter either by no sterilising
the fermenter properly before using it, wild yeast getting
into the fermenter by during fermenting or with traditional
brewing by letting wild yeast get into the wort when before
adding the brewing yeast.

> This leaves any debris at the bottom of the bottle, in the bottle.

> An experienced home-brewer, will serve your pint, decantslowly (not tip
> the bottle over and let it "glug"), and thenthe silt at the bottom, you
> don't serve that to your visitor.

Some of the barmen ask you which way you want it poured.

And plenty of home brewers use kegs, not bottles.

> Obviously, home brew beer is missing some steps.

Normally only the filtration step when kegs are used.

> Commercial beer is filtered and pasteurized.

> https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/B9780128152584000135

> "After maturation, most of beers are filtered and pasteurized.
> Such processes
> aim to purify the beer, clarify, and reduce total microorganism
> count.
> Filtration with diatomaceous earth (DE) and pasteurization (slow
> or fast)
> are usually performed."

> The "fast" refers to flash pasteurization. The commercial beer industry,
> shares tech discoveries with the dairy industry.

> Craft beer ? No idea.

Normally they don't and that's why the barman asks you
how you want it poured from the bottle if they pour it.

> Craft beer ls like commercial beer,

Its actually a hybrid between homebrew and commercial beer.

> but it's on a smaller scale, and "it's actually beer" :-)
> A craft beer doesn't usually taste like commercial swill.
> But commercial swill is very consistent. Exactly thesame yellow piss
> from one bottle to the next.

Plenty of commercial beer is nothing like yellow.

Rod Speed

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Feb 18, 2024, 12:53:41 PMFeb 18
to
On Sun, 18 Feb 2024 22:16:21 +1100, Jethro_uk <jeth...@hotmailbin.com>
wrote:

> On Sun, 18 Feb 2024 10:16:53 +0000, alan_m wrote:
>
> When I home brewed, I settled on a "Canadian Blond" from Coopers. A kit
> that made 40 litres. They had quite a range.

32l actually.

> There were 3 home brew shops within a 30 minute drive back in 2017. One
> went bust in 2017 because he was a nob (as soon as I saw a brand new van
> in their car park, I knew they would go bust). One close in 2019 as the
> landlord wanted the premises back after 30 years and they wanted to
> retire. And the last and nearest went bust in 2020.

> All of them had the raw ingredients for the real nerd to make their own
> wort from scratch, etc, etc. I would have though such shops would be a
> source of fascination to the average uk.d-i-y-er

> I stopped brewing because at a single pint a day, it was a lot of faff.
> And then I removed that from my diet to enjoy spirits more :)

> For wine, we take 4 days to finish a bottle - we just have a small glass
> with dinner - so the faff of making your own isn't worth the effort.

> If we were more sociable, it might make more sense.

> Also I like cold, lager type beers. Which means an extra step of bottling
> (unless you go OTT and build a kegirator) whereas aley types can leave a
> barrel on a counter and just pour from that.

You can buy kegerators, They are a fridge with a number
of kegs in it with a number of beer taps like you see in a pub,
anywhere from 1-4 in a bar fridge sized fridge with the taps
on top.

Peeler

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Feb 18, 2024, 1:10:13 PMFeb 18
to
On Mon, 19 Feb 2024 04:47:02 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent

Peeler

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Feb 18, 2024, 1:10:42 PMFeb 18
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On Mon, 19 Feb 2024 04:30:00 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

<FLUSH the abnormal trolling senile cretin's latest trollshit unread>

--
Bod addressing senile Rodent Speed:
"Rod, you have a sick twisted mind. I suggest you stop your mindless
and totally irresponsible talk. Your mouth could get you into a lot of
trouble."
MID: <gfbb94...@mid.individual.net>

Peeler

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Feb 18, 2024, 1:11:32 PMFeb 18
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On Mon, 19 Feb 2024 04:53:29 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

<FLUSH the abnormal trolling senile cretin's latest trollshit unread>

--

alan_m

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Feb 18, 2024, 4:14:39 PMFeb 18
to
Rubbish. If a brewery has a yeast contamination the brew WILL taste
completely different, usually for the worse.

https://www.murphyandson.co.uk/ncyc/

Rod Speed

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Feb 18, 2024, 5:10:35 PMFeb 18
to
alan_m <ju...@admac.myzen.co.uk> wrote
> Rod Speed wrote
>> alan_m <ju...@admac.myzen.co.uk> wrote
>>> Rod Speed wrote

>>>>> and frequent yeast contamination.Each batch probably tasted
>>>>> different.

>>>> Fantasy.

>>> As its still a potential problem with modern brewing pray tell how
>>> they avoided it in the past.

>> That was a comment on the last sentence.

>> That doesnt happen even if you are careless about contamination.

> Rubbish.

Fact.

> If a brewery has a yeast contamination

Easy to avoid wild yeast getting into the wort.

> the brew WILL taste completely different,

Wrong again.

> usually for the worse.

Have fun explaining why wine which usually is fermented
using wild yeast from the grape skins doesnt.

> https://www.murphyandson.co.uk/ncyc/

Says nothing about wild yeast contamination or what
happened with brewing the past contamination wise.

Peeler

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Feb 18, 2024, 5:15:03 PMFeb 18
to
On Mon, 19 Feb 2024 09:10:23 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

<FLUSH the abnormal trolling senile cretin's latest trollshit unread>

--
Website (from 2007) dedicated to the nonagenarian and senile Australian
cretin's pathological trolling:
https://www.pcreview.co.uk/threads/rod-speed-faq.2973853/

charles

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Feb 19, 2024, 6:45:09 AMFeb 19