Makita TD020DSE - comments after a month or two's use

21 views
Skip to first unread message

tin...@isbd.co.uk

unread,
Jul 23, 2008, 11:36:40 AM7/23/08
to
I bought a Makita TD020DSE a few months ago after reading some
recommendations here and thought I'd report on what I think of it.

Good points:-
It's quite light.
I like the little built in torch.
The batteries last well.

Bad points:-
The switches don't come to hand easily.
The bit holder is "back to front" (i.e. you pull the collar out to insert
a bit, most unnatural and unlike every other one I've used).
There's no speed or torque control at all.

It's that last point that means I don't use the TD020DSE as much as I
otherwise would. It's far too crude to use for many screwdriving jobs.
When you press the trigger you get whizz-rat-ta-tat-tat and there's no
controlling it at all. My really cheap and nasty green Bosch 9.6 volt
cordless is actually *much* more controllable and more powerful. I
just did a test, the TD020DSE takes about twice as long to drive a 4mm
x 4cm screw as does the Bosch PSR960 and it makes a racket while it
does it. The PSR960's batteries are knackered though and don't hold
their charge well.

.... and why on earth they supply two PZ3 bits with the TD020DSE I'll
never know, it's incapable of driving screws that size.

--
Chris Green

Rod

unread,
Jul 23, 2008, 12:10:01 PM7/23/08
to
tin...@isbd.co.uk wrote:
> I bought a Makita TD020DSE a few months ago after reading some
> recommendations here and thought I'd report on what I think of it.
>
> Good points:-
> It's quite light.
> I like the little built in torch.
> The batteries last well.
>
> Bad points:-
> The switches don't come to hand easily.
> The bit holder is "back to front" (i.e. you pull the collar out to insert
> a bit, most unnatural and unlike every other one I've used).
> There's no speed or torque control at all.
>
> It's that last point that means I don't use the TD020DSE as much as I
> otherwise would. It's far too crude to use for many screwdriving jobs.
> When you press the trigger you get whizz-rat-ta-tat-tat and there's no
> controlling it at all. My really cheap and nasty green Bosch 9.6 volt
> cordless is actually *much* more controllable and more powerful. I
> just did a test, the TD020DSE takes about twice as long to drive a 4mm
> x 4cm screw as does the Bosch PSR960 and it makes a racket while it
> does it. The PSR960's batteries are knackered though and don't hold
> their charge well.
>
> ..... and why on earth they supply two PZ3 bits with the TD020DSE I'll

> never know, it's incapable of driving screws that size.
>

First thing I did was drive a large screw - PZ3 - into a tough fence
post. It certainly did that. And it beats the pants off my other small
Bosch driver (which is a low end model - can't remember which one right
now).

I also wish it had some variability but the more I use it, the less it
is a problem.

I *like* the switches - especially in awkward corners. I thought I
wouldn't but came to do so.

I certainly would like a next-model-up with a bit more power, variable
speed/torque and, ideally, ability to switch the impact on or off.

Noise - I agree. I wish it were quieter.

Bit retainer - it's the only one I have anything like it is - my small
one is just a hex socket with a wimpy magnet, my drill/driver has a full
chuck. I just assumed it would work the way it does. But if I others
that were the other way round, I would agree with you.

--
Rod

Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
onset.
Although common it frequently goes undiagnosed.
<www.thyromind.info> <www.thyroiduk.org> <www.altsupportthyroid.org>

tin...@isbd.co.uk

unread,
Jul 23, 2008, 1:33:10 PM7/23/08
to
Blimey! There's no way mine would put a 6mm screw into a fence post.
6mm diameter screws are the only ones I have which have PZ3 heads.
Apart from anything else you need something serious to hold onto for
that sort of torque.

> I also wish it had some variability but the more I use it, the less it
> is a problem.
>
> I *like* the switches - especially in awkward corners. I thought I
> wouldn't but came to do so.
>

I'm not totally convinced I don't like the switches, but I nearly
always have to look to find them which seems wrong to me.


> I certainly would like a next-model-up with a bit more power, variable
> speed/torque and, ideally, ability to switch the impact on or off.
>

Yes, I think that's what I really feel about it. I don't want more
power as I bought it specifically to be a lightweight/quick
screwdriver but more speed control and turning off the impact would be
*much* better.

> Noise - I agree. I wish it were quieter.
>
> Bit retainer - it's the only one I have anything like it is - my small
> one is just a hex socket with a wimpy magnet, my drill/driver has a full
> chuck. I just assumed it would work the way it does. But if I others
> that were the other way round, I would agree with you.
>

When I say it's like no other I'm referring to the "quick release" bit
sets I have. All their bit holders pull back towards the drill to
releas the bit. It seems a much more natural way round to do it
(though maybe that's familiarity). Two handed it makes more sense for
the hand on the bit holder to pull one way while the hand on the bit
pulls the other way.

--
Chris Green

Rod

unread,
Jul 23, 2008, 3:34:35 PM7/23/08
to
tin...@isbd.co.uk wrote:

> Rod <poly...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
<>
>>
>> First thing I did was drive a large screw - PZ3 - into a tough fence
>> post. It certainly did that. And it beats the pants off my other small
>> Bosch driver (which is a low end model - can't remember which one right
>> now).
>>
> Blimey! There's no way mine would put a 6mm screw into a fence post.
> 6mm diameter screws are the only ones I have which have PZ3 heads.
> Apart from anything else you need something serious to hold onto for
> that sort of torque.
>
<>

6.0 x 80 Turbo Ultra (Stainless) from Screwfix - without a pilot hole.
The head was nicely countersunk by the driver alone.

dennis@home

unread,
Jul 23, 2008, 3:42:09 PM7/23/08
to

<tin...@isbd.co.uk> wrote in message
news:48876b56$0$753$bed6...@news.gradwell.net...
> Rod <poly...@ntlworld.com> wrote:

8<

>> First thing I did was drive a large screw - PZ3 - into a tough fence
>> post. It certainly did that. And it beats the pants off my other small
>> Bosch driver (which is a low end model - can't remember which one right
>> now).
>>
> Blimey! There's no way mine would put a 6mm screw into a fence post.
> 6mm diameter screws are the only ones I have which have PZ3 heads.
> Apart from anything else you need something serious to hold onto for
> that sort of torque.

What torque?
My Ryobi impact driver has no real torque back to the hand at all when
driving big screws.
Are you sure yours is working as an impact driver?
One of the best reasons to use an impact driver is the lack of torque in
use, even a five year old could hold one against a big screw.

The Medway Handyman

unread,
Jul 23, 2008, 3:49:10 PM7/23/08
to
tin...@isbd.co.uk wrote:
> I bought a Makita TD020DSE a few months ago after reading some
> recommendations here and thought I'd report on what I think of it.

Hi Chris

I think I'm to blame for starting this :-(

>
> Good points:-
> It's quite light.
> I like the little built in torch.
> The batteries last well.

Agreed

> Bad points:-
> The switches don't come to hand easily.

I like them to be honest. I'm forever forgetting to chnge my drill drivers
from reverse back to forward etc.

> The bit holder is "back to front" (i.e. you pull the collar out to
> insert a bit, most unnatural and unlike every other one I've used).

I've got the TD0200, a 12v Makita impact driver & a Makita mains impact
driver - the bit holder is the same on all three, so if I found a machine
where you pulled the collar forward I'd find that odd. Obviously a Makita
thing.

> There's no speed or torque control at all.

It does have a clutch of sorts. I use mine all the time for flatpack. It
will put in cam studs until the base is flush then stop. Perfect, no over
tightening.

>
> It's that last point that means I don't use the TD020DSE as much as I
> otherwise would. It's far too crude to use for many screwdriving
> jobs. When you press the trigger you get whizz-rat-ta-tat-tat and
> there's no controlling it at all. My really cheap and nasty green
> Bosch 9.6 volt cordless is actually *much* more controllable and more
> powerful.

I love it with a magnetic holder - Wera Ringmagnet Rapidaptor -
http://www.screwfix.com/prods/68068/Screwdriver-Bits/Bit-Holders/Wera-Ringmagnet-Rapidaptor -
expensive but excellent.


>I just did a test, the TD020DSE takes about twice as long to drive a 4mm
> x 4cm screw as does the Bosch PSR960 and it makes a racket while it
> does it. The PSR960's batteries are knackered though and don't hold
> their charge well.

Granted its not anything like a powerful as say a 12v driver, the light
weight, fast initial stsrt speed & no 'torque reaction' make it ideal for
fiddly jobs.

> .... and why on earth they supply two PZ3 bits with the TD020DSE I'll
> never know, it's incapable of driving screws that size.

Dunno, never tried it. Not what I bought it for.


--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

The Medway Handyman

unread,
Jul 23, 2008, 3:52:44 PM7/23/08
to
Rod wrote:

>
> I also wish it had some variability but the more I use it, the less it
> is a problem.
>
> I *like* the switches - especially in awkward corners. I thought I
> wouldn't but came to do so.
>
> I certainly would like a next-model-up with a bit more power, variable
> speed/torque and, ideally, ability to switch the impact on or off.

Come to think of it, do any impact drivers have variable speed & impact
switch off? I have 12v & mains Makita impact deivers & they work just
like the TD020. No experience of other makes.


>
> Noise - I agree. I wish it were quieter.

Bigger ones are even louder :-)

Dave Plowman (News)

unread,
Jul 23, 2008, 6:56:25 PM7/23/08
to
In article <48875008$0$761$bed6...@news.gradwell.net>,

<tin...@isbd.co.uk> wrote:
> I bought a Makita TD020DSE a few months ago after reading some
> recommendations here and thought I'd report on what I think of it.

> Good points:-
> It's quite light.

I doubt you'll find anything of that torque which is lighter.

> I like the little built in torch.

Never used it.
> The batteries last well.

True.

> Bad points:-
> The switches don't come to hand easily.

Yes- although it might depend on hand size.

> The bit holder is "back to front" (i.e. you pull the collar out to
> insert a bit, most unnatural and unlike every other one I've used).

Doesn't worry me.

> There's no speed or torque control at all.

There is a form of torque control - it gradually builds up the torque with
each click.

> It's that last point that means I don't use the TD020DSE as much as I
> otherwise would. It's far too crude to use for many screwdriving jobs.
> When you press the trigger you get whizz-rat-ta-tat-tat and there's no
> controlling it at all.

I've really not found that a problem. But then I wouldn't use any power
screwdriver for delicate things anyway.

> My really cheap and nasty green Bosch 9.6 volt
> cordless is actually *much* more controllable and more powerful.

I'll bet it hasn't got the same maximum torque - and will be larger and
heavier?

> I just did a test, the TD020DSE takes about twice as long to drive a
> 4mm x 4cm screw as does the Bosch PSR960 and it makes a racket while it
> does it. The PSR960's batteries are knackered though and don't hold
> their charge well.

If it's driving it in that fast how has it better control?
But the other thing is the impact action much reduces cam out. Very
noticeable with slot head screws.

> .... and why on earth they supply two PZ3 bits with the TD020DSE I'll
> never know, it's incapable of driving screws that size.

Into ordinary wood? No problem.

My main gripe is the handle should lock in the pistol grip position-
several times it has gone to the 'straight' position when driving awkward
screws.

If you got yours for the 30 ish quid off Ebay - be glad. I've seen them
for over twice that in other places.

--
*If at first you don't succeed, redefine success.

Dave Plowman da...@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.

John Rumm

unread,
Jul 23, 2008, 7:22:44 PM7/23/08
to
The Medway Handyman wrote:

> Come to think of it, do any impact drivers have variable speed & impact
> switch off? I have 12v & mains Makita impact deivers & they work just
> like the TD020. No experience of other makes.

My 18V Makita impact driver is variable speed, but there is no impact
off since that is its only purpose in life really. One of the four
function combis however obviously have impact off modes.

--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\=================================================================/

John Rumm

unread,
Jul 23, 2008, 7:29:45 PM7/23/08
to
tin...@isbd.co.uk wrote:
> I bought a Makita TD020DSE a few months ago after reading some
> recommendations here and thought I'd report on what I think of it.
>
> Good points:-
> It's quite light.
> I like the little built in torch.
> The batteries last well.

Yup, go along with that...

> Bad points:-
> The switches don't come to hand easily.

I don't find them too bad.

> The bit holder is "back to front" (i.e. you pull the collar out to insert
> a bit, most unnatural and unlike every other one I've used).

That is the same as every other impact driver I have used to be honest,
so I don't think it is an unusual design.

> There's no speed or torque control at all.

Yup, speed control would make it more versatile.

> .... and why on earth they supply two PZ3 bits with the TD020DSE I'll
> never know, it's incapable of driving screws that size.

With practice you can drive small screws, but it is not a natural at it.
My 18V combi does a better job on the really small stuff!

dennis@home

unread,
Jul 24, 2008, 4:02:32 AM7/24/08
to

"The Medway Handyman" <davi...@nospamblueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
news:g_Lhk.31883$E41....@text.news.virginmedia.com...


> Rod wrote:
>
>>
>> I also wish it had some variability but the more I use it, the less it
>> is a problem.
>>
>> I *like* the switches - especially in awkward corners. I thought I
>> wouldn't but came to do so.
>>
>> I certainly would like a next-model-up with a bit more power, variable
>> speed/torque and, ideally, ability to switch the impact on or off.
>
> Come to think of it, do any impact drivers have variable speed & impact
> switch off? I have 12v & mains Makita impact deivers & they work just
> like the TD020. No experience of other makes.

My ryobi has variable speed.
It doesn't have a switch to turn the impact off but it doesn't impact at all
unless the screw is resisting motion.
It appears to have a clutch that only engages the impact mechanism once the
screw resist enough.
I have driven 13x4 mm screw without problems using it.
Its quite quite when doing small screws and makes a hell of a din when
driving big ones.

tin...@isbd.co.uk

unread,
Jul 24, 2008, 4:05:15 AM7/24/08
to
Rod <poly...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
> tin...@isbd.co.uk wrote:
> > Rod <poly...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
> <>
> >>
> >> First thing I did was drive a large screw - PZ3 - into a tough fence
> >> post. It certainly did that. And it beats the pants off my other small
> >> Bosch driver (which is a low end model - can't remember which one right
> >> now).
> >>
> > Blimey! There's no way mine would put a 6mm screw into a fence post.
> > 6mm diameter screws are the only ones I have which have PZ3 heads.
> > Apart from anything else you need something serious to hold onto for
> > that sort of torque.
> >
> <>
>
> 6.0 x 80 Turbo Ultra (Stainless) from Screwfix - without a pilot hole.
> The head was nicely countersunk by the driver alone.
>
Well I just tried *exactly* the same (I use those screws too) and it
gave up when the screw had only gone in about 1", it took ages to get
that far even. This was into a (fairly new) softwood gatepost. It
couldn't get it out either, I had to go and get my 9.6v Metabo to
remove it.

> Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
> onset.
> Although common it frequently goes undiagnosed.

I'm lucky, I have a switched on GP who spotted it from some other
blood tests I had done! :-)

--
Chris Green

tin...@isbd.co.uk

unread,
Jul 24, 2008, 4:07:54 AM7/24/08
to
It certainly is working as an impact driver, horrible noise! :-)

My recent experiment driving a 6mm screw into a gatepost (it only
managed about 1") did produce some torque one had to hold against
though I admit it's less than with a conventional driver. It's only
the mass/inertia of the driver that reduces the torque you feel.

--
Chris Green

Rod

unread,
Jul 24, 2008, 4:15:21 AM7/24/08
to

The fence post was several years old but absolutely sound. I have a
feeling that slightly aged wood might be better than new(-ish).

You are unlucky. :-(

But a bit luckier than the many in whom it is ignored for decades.

I hope you have taken the time to read all about it? Many doctors, even
if they are good at initial diagnosis (which seems to be rare), are poor
at long term management. Anyway - that is rather OT - but will always
respond to email or alt.support.thyroid posts if needed. :-)

--
Rod

Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
onset.
Although common it frequently goes undiagnosed.

<www.thyromind.info> <www.thyroiduk.org> <www.altsupportthyroid.org>

Dave Plowman (News)

unread,
Jul 24, 2008, 9:33:08 AM7/24/08
to
In article <4888385a$0$757$bed6...@news.gradwell.net>,

<tin...@isbd.co.uk> wrote:
> It certainly is working as an impact driver, horrible noise! :-)

> My recent experiment driving a 6mm screw into a gatepost (it only
> managed about 1") did produce some torque one had to hold against
> though I admit it's less than with a conventional driver. It's only
> the mass/inertia of the driver that reduces the torque you feel.

Well, the Makita which is the thread is about the lightest impact driver
you'll find and has as near enough no torque feedback to the hand. If it
isn't near eliminating this it isn't doing its job.

--
*Some days we are the flies; some days we are the windscreen.*

John Rumm

unread,
Jul 24, 2008, 12:55:53 PM7/24/08
to
Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
> In article <4888385a$0$757$bed6...@news.gradwell.net>,
> <tin...@isbd.co.uk> wrote:
>> It certainly is working as an impact driver, horrible noise! :-)
>
>> My recent experiment driving a 6mm screw into a gatepost (it only
>> managed about 1") did produce some torque one had to hold against
>> though I admit it's less than with a conventional driver. It's only
>> the mass/inertia of the driver that reduces the torque you feel.
>
> Well, the Makita which is the thread is about the lightest impact driver
> you'll find and has as near enough no torque feedback to the hand. If it
> isn't near eliminating this it isn't doing its job.

Worth bearing mind the small Mak only produces 17Nm - so not much by
grown up driver standards, although good for the size and weight.

The Medway Handyman

unread,
Jul 24, 2008, 3:19:25 PM7/24/08
to

I reckon there is something wrong with yours - no back torque with mine at
all.

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages