Bowsaw

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PeterC

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Sep 25, 2009, 1:01:16 PM9/25/09
to
Need to get a bowsaw for use this Winter as the spinney at the bottom of
the garden has been advancing for a few years.
Nothing too big: there's an ash tree that's about 10cm thick and will soon
be tall enough to fall on the hose and some hawthorn of similar size.

I looked at this:

http://www.screwfix.com/prods/59875

which should be big enough and wondered if it's reasonable.

As for spare blades, there's only this:

http://www.screwfix.com/prods/63511

which gets v. bad reviews. Given that a blade will wear out or break before
I've done the job, what are the alternatives? I prefer somewhere local
rather than on t'net, so a shed is likely.

Cheers.
--
Peter.
The head of a pin will hold more angels if
it's been flattened with an angel-grinder.

The Wanderer

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Sep 25, 2009, 1:38:04 PM9/25/09
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On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 18:01:16 +0100, PeterC wrote:

> Need to get a bowsaw for use this Winter as the spinney at the bottom of
> the garden has been advancing for a few years.
> Nothing too big: there's an ash tree that's about 10cm thick and will soon
> be tall enough to fall on the hose and some hawthorn of similar size.
>
> I looked at this:
>
> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/59875
>
> which should be big enough and wondered if it's reasonable.
>
> As for spare blades, there's only this:
>
> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/63511
>
> which gets v. bad reviews. Given that a blade will wear out or break before
> I've done the job, what are the alternatives? I prefer somewhere local
> rather than on t'net, so a shed is likely.


Why not try a local 'country' or farm store? Had my bowsaw for donkeys
years and only on the second or third blade.


--
The Wanderer

Wine Improves with age. The older I get the better it tastes!

NT

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Sep 25, 2009, 1:42:21 PM9/25/09
to
On Sep 25, 6:01 pm, PeterC <giraffenos....@homecall.co.uk> wrote:
> Need to get a bowsaw for use this Winter as the spinney at the bottom of
> the garden has been advancing for a few years.
> Nothing too big: there's an ash tree that's about 10cm thick and will soon
> be tall enough to fall on the hose and some hawthorn of similar size.

Bowsaws are quicker, but by the time you've gone and got one for such
little wood, it would have been far quicker to get out a basic handsaw
and do it. If you were doing a whole bunch of much bigger stuff then
yes I'd get a bow.


NT

Andy Champ

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Sep 25, 2009, 2:31:51 PM9/25/09
to
NT wrote:
>
> Bowsaws are quicker, but by the time you've gone and got one for such
> little wood, it would have been far quicker to get out a basic handsaw
> and do it. If you were doing a whole bunch of much bigger stuff then
> yes I'd get a bow.
>

The other advantage is that I don't have to worry about damaging my
carpentry tools with green wood, damp ground, and falling debris.

Andy

The Medway Handyman

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Sep 25, 2009, 2:46:42 PM9/25/09
to
PeterC wrote:
> Need to get a bowsaw for use this Winter as the spinney at the bottom
> of the garden has been advancing for a few years.
> Nothing too big: there's an ash tree that's about 10cm thick and will
> soon be tall enough to fall on the hose and some hawthorn of similar
> size.
>
> I looked at this:
>
> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/59875
>
> which should be big enough and wondered if it's reasonable.
>
> As for spare blades, there's only this:
>
> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/63511
>
> which gets v. bad reviews. Given that a blade will wear out or break
> before I've done the job, what are the alternatives? I prefer
> somewhere local rather than on t'net, so a shed is likely.

Got mine from Wickes, seems fine to me.


--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk


PeterC

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Sep 25, 2009, 3:07:07 PM9/25/09
to

Good point - there's a Central Wool Growers in Towcesetr.

PeterC

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Sep 25, 2009, 3:08:40 PM9/25/09
to

I've done that but when one is up a tree and holding on with one hand, the
handsaw clogs up and gets stuck. I've other wood to cut up as well, so I
felt that a bowsaw would just be easier.

PeterC

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Sep 25, 2009, 3:09:22 PM9/25/09
to

Saw or blade? That blade has 3 v. bad reviews.

george (dicegeorge)

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Sep 25, 2009, 3:35:11 PM9/25/09
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Bowsaws:

i think there are 2 kinds of blades,
most cut dead wood,
but there are special blades for cutting green wood.

[g]

The Medway Handyman

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Sep 25, 2009, 7:21:30 PM9/25/09
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Saw c/w blade. Had it for a few years, still on the original blade, not
used that much TBH, but still works a treat.

John Rumm

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Sep 25, 2009, 7:44:43 PM9/25/09
to
PeterC wrote:
> On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 10:42:21 -0700 (PDT), NT wrote:
>
>> On Sep 25, 6:01 pm, PeterC <giraffenos....@homecall.co.uk> wrote:
>>> Need to get a bowsaw for use this Winter as the spinney at the bottom of
>>> the garden has been advancing for a few years.
>>> Nothing too big: there's an ash tree that's about 10cm thick and will soon
>>> be tall enough to fall on the hose and some hawthorn of similar size.
>> Bowsaws are quicker, but by the time you've gone and got one for such
>> little wood, it would have been far quicker to get out a basic handsaw
>> and do it. If you were doing a whole bunch of much bigger stuff then
>> yes I'd get a bow.
>>
>> NT
>
> I've done that but when one is up a tree and holding on with one hand, the
> handsaw clogs up and gets stuck. I've other wood to cut up as well, so I
> felt that a bowsaw would just be easier.

And, next time you do the job you will have the saw ready ;-)


--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\=================================================================/

R

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Sep 26, 2009, 2:46:55 AM9/26/09
to

"PeterC" <giraffe...@homecall.co.uk> wrote in message
news:iyzbqirq9nn4$.33bcrtgs3j29$.dlg@40tude.net...

> Need to get a bowsaw for use this Winter as the spinney at the bottom of
> the garden has been advancing for a few years.
> Nothing too big: there's an ash tree that's about 10cm thick and will soon
> be tall enough to fall on the hose and some hawthorn of similar size.
>
> I looked at this:
>
> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/59875
>
> which should be big enough and wondered if it's reasonable.
>
> As for spare blades, there's only this:
>
> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/63511
>
> which gets v. bad reviews. Given that a blade will wear out or break
> before
> I've done the job, what are the alternatives? I prefer somewhere local
> rather than on t'net, so a shed is likely.

2 types of blade used.
1 for "normal" dry timber such as flooring, joists and the like.
1 for green wood used naturally on live/wet wood and recently felled (Wind
damaged etc)

Several types and lengths of "Bow Saw" used, pruning and the traditional Bow
Saw.

If looking to fell small trees use a hard point "Green" wood blade.

There are dozens of saws on Ebay with plenty of blades to choose from and
are cheap.

Spear and Jackson for longevity, or anyone else's for the "Throw away" type
is it's likely to be used only a few times. Horses-for-courses etc.

As an alternative you could check out Item 380161009301 on Ebay, used one
for clearing a small copse of unwanted saplings to give more space for other
growth, worked well enough.


dennis@home

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Sep 26, 2009, 3:40:43 AM9/26/09
to

"R" <no_...@nowhere.tv> wrote in message
news:D9KdnfMSY5x8JSDX...@bt.com...

> Spear and Jackson for longevity, or anyone else's for the "Throw away"
> type is it's likely to be used only a few times. Horses-for-courses etc.

I have a S&J "hand" saw with normal teeth at one end and the big greenwood
teeth at the end nearest the handle.
It will cut 4" stuff with ease.

If there is a lot then I have a �15 PP power saw that takes 10" greenwood
blades.

PeterC

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Sep 26, 2009, 4:16:37 AM9/26/09
to
On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 23:21:30 GMT, The Medway Handyman wrote:

>>> which gets v. bad reviews. Given that a blade will wear out or break
>>>> before I've done the job, what are the alternatives? I prefer
>>>> somewhere local rather than on t'net, so a shed is likely.
>>>
>>> Got mine from Wickes, seems fine to me.
>>
>> Saw or blade? That blade has 3 v. bad reviews.
>
> Saw c/w blade. Had it for a few years, still on the original blade, not
> used that much TBH, but still works a treat.

Right, thanks, so the original blade's OK. Sod's Law though...

PeterC

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Sep 26, 2009, 4:18:39 AM9/26/09
to

That's useful info., thanks. A greenwood blade should be what I need.

I'd rather avoid e-bay as I don't trust it or Paypal and also I'd rather
find something locally if it's not silly money. I hate staying in for
vandroids.

PeterC

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Sep 26, 2009, 4:19:33 AM9/26/09
to
On Sat, 26 Sep 2009 08:40:43 +0100, dennis@home wrote:

> "R" <no_...@nowhere.tv> wrote in message
> news:D9KdnfMSY5x8JSDX...@bt.com...
>
>> Spear and Jackson for longevity, or anyone else's for the "Throw away"
>> type is it's likely to be used only a few times. Horses-for-courses etc.
>
> I have a S&J "hand" saw with normal teeth at one end and the big greenwood
> teeth at the end nearest the handle.
> It will cut 4" stuff with ease.

I'll have a look for that - it makes sense to have the versatility -
thanks.


>
> If there is a lot then I have a �15 PP power saw that takes 10" greenwood
> blades.

Roger Chapman

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Sep 26, 2009, 5:16:44 AM9/26/09
to
PeterC wrote:

> Need to get a bowsaw for use this Winter as the spinney at the bottom of
> the garden has been advancing for a few years.
> Nothing too big: there's an ash tree that's about 10cm thick and will soon
> be tall enough to fall on the hose and some hawthorn of similar size.
>
> I looked at this:
>
> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/59875
>
> which should be big enough and wondered if it's reasonable.
>
> As for spare blades, there's only this:
>
> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/63511
>
> which gets v. bad reviews. Given that a blade will wear out or break before
> I've done the job, what are the alternatives? I prefer somewhere local
> rather than on t'net, so a shed is likely.

I got my bowsaw at the local ironmongers. likewise replacement blades.
He sells at least 2 makes of blades and I have long since learned that
it is not cost effective to buy the cheapest.

If you are going to be digging out the roots it helps if you leave the
main trunk attached until after the root is out. If not then be aware
that with the hawthorn at least the root will produce a multitude of
sprouts and quickly turn into a small bush.

On bigger stuff I tend to use an axe rather than a bowsaw and I use a
mattock for digging out and cutting roots.

Incidentally I had an ash like yours in my garden 30 years ago but
missed the chance to take it out when it was still manageable. It is now
at least twice the height of the house and the trunk is well over a foot
thick. If I ever have to drop it it is going to cause considerable
damage to something, even if it is just a wall.

NT

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Sep 26, 2009, 5:35:28 AM9/26/09
to
On Sep 25, 8:08 pm, PeterC <giraffenos....@homecall.co.uk> wrote:
> On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 10:42:21 -0700 (PDT), NT wrote:
> > On Sep 25, 6:01 pm, PeterC <giraffenos....@homecall.co.uk> wrote:
> >> Need to get a bowsaw for use this Winter as the spinney at the bottom of
> >> the garden has been advancing for a few years.
> >> Nothing too big: there's an ash tree that's about 10cm thick and will soon
> >> be tall enough to fall on the hose and some hawthorn of similar size.
>
> > Bowsaws are quicker, but by the time you've gone and got one for such
> > little wood, it would have been far quicker to get out a basic handsaw
> > and do it. If you were doing a whole bunch of much bigger stuff then
> > yes I'd get a bow.
>
> > NT
>
> I've done that but when one is up a tree and holding on with one hand, the
> handsaw clogs up and gets stuck. I've other wood to cut up as well, so I
> felt that a bowsaw would just be easier.


Sounds good, if you like handsaws. I tend to use a circular for small
trees these days, it has one major gotcha that's avoidable, and that's
that wind or timber weight can close up on the blade, and the saw can
then throw at the user. 2 solutions to this are:
1. for small trees, rope them pulled over to one side
2. use a cordless circ, which is low power enough to be easily held if
it tries to kick.


NT

PeterC

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Sep 26, 2009, 5:56:00 AM9/26/09
to
On Sat, 26 Sep 2009 10:16:44 +0100, Roger Chapman wrote:

> PeterC wrote:
>
>> Need to get a bowsaw for use this Winter as the spinney at the bottom of
>> the garden has been advancing for a few years.
>> Nothing too big: there's an ash tree that's about 10cm thick and will soon
>> be tall enough to fall on the hose and some hawthorn of similar size.
>>
>> I looked at this:
>>
>> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/59875
>>
>> which should be big enough and wondered if it's reasonable.
>>
>> As for spare blades, there's only this:
>>
>> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/63511
>>
>> which gets v. bad reviews. Given that a blade will wear out or break before
>> I've done the job, what are the alternatives? I prefer somewhere local
>> rather than on t'net, so a shed is likely.
>
> I got my bowsaw at the local ironmongers. likewise replacement blades.
> He sells at least 2 makes of blades and I have long since learned that
> it is not cost effective to buy the cheapest.

Indeed, false economy - and if it's local, complaining is easier.


>
> If you are going to be digging out the roots it helps if you leave the
> main trunk attached until after the root is out. If not then be aware
> that with the hawthorn at least the root will produce a multitude of
> sprouts and quickly turn into a small bush.

No digging of roots! I don't mind them being bushes then trimming them
every few years. The hawthorn was cut back hard and is now an attractive


bush.
>
> On bigger stuff I tend to use an axe rather than a bowsaw and I use a
> mattock for digging out and cutting roots.

I'll use a ladder and take it down in bits - there's nowhere to fell a
tree.


>
> Incidentally I had an ash like yours in my garden 30 years ago but
> missed the chance to take it out when it was still manageable. It is now
> at least twice the height of the house and the trunk is well over a foot
> thick. If I ever have to drop it it is going to cause considerable
> damage to something, even if it is just a wall.

When the spinney is trimmed back the local firm takes the big 'uns
incrementally.

Steve Firth

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Sep 26, 2009, 6:22:19 AM9/26/09
to
PeterC <giraffe...@homecall.co.uk> wrote:

> Given that a blade will wear out or break before
> I've done the job, what are the alternatives? I prefer somewhere local
> rather than on t'net, so a shed is likely.

I buy Sandvik bowsaws and blades for use on the farm. I get them from
agricultural suppliers rather than from Screwfix et al. If I were you,
I'd also consider getting a proper pruning saw, because it's difficult
to use a bowsaw for pruning unless you have good access all round.

We make a lot of use of these:

http://www.pruningworld.co.uk/26_Equipment_041718_Sandvik_Bahco_5124JS_J
S_Pruning_Saw_.asp

http://tinyurl.com/y9dlaxa

http://www.pruningworld.co.uk/041720_Sandvik_Bahco_5128JSH_Pruning_saw_w
ith_holster_.asp

http://tinyurl.com/yenovap

I can't praise them highly enough. Extremely well made. They cut on the
pull stroke and have a double row of teeth that are as sharp as razors.
They cut through green wood faster than a bowsaw and can be used to cut
close up to the trunk.

PeterC

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Sep 26, 2009, 7:55:46 AM9/26/09
to
On Sat, 26 Sep 2009 11:22:19 +0100, Steve Firth wrote:

>> Given that a blade will wear out or break before
>> I've done the job, what are the alternatives? I prefer somewhere local
>> rather than on t'net, so a shed is likely.
>
> I buy Sandvik bowsaws and blades for use on the farm. I get them from
> agricultural suppliers rather than from Screwfix et al. If I were you,
> I'd also consider getting a proper pruning saw, because it's difficult
> to use a bowsaw for pruning unless you have good access all round.

Good point. The hawthorn has multiple trunks now - rigging the frame round
a trunk would be a pain.


>
> We make a lot of use of these:

We make a lot of use of these:

http://www.pruningworld.co.uk/26_Equipment_041718_Sandvik_Bahco_5124JS_J
S_Pruning_Saw_.asp

http://tinyurl.com/y9dlaxa

http://www.pruningworld.co.uk/041720_Sandvik_Bahco_5128JSH_Pruning_saw_w
ith_holster_.asp

http://tinyurl.com/yenovap

I can't praise them highly enough. Extremely well made. They cut on the
pull stroke and have a double row of teeth that are as sharp as razors.
They cut through green wood faster than a bowsaw and can be used to cut
close up to the trunk.

Look good. Would they manage 3" trunks?

Steve Firth

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Sep 26, 2009, 8:39:00 AM9/26/09
to
PeterC <giraffe...@homecall.co.uk> wrote:

> Look good. Would they manage 3" trunks?

Easily. The blade is 24cm and they go through a 3-4 inch trunk like a
knife through hot butter. The only potential problem is sap making the
blade sticky and causing drag. You can prevent that by oiling the blade
before use and also by washing it in water from time to time.

The Medway Handyman

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Sep 26, 2009, 11:24:27 AM9/26/09
to
NT wrote:
> On Sep 25, 8:08 pm, PeterC <giraffenos....@homecall.co.uk> wrote:
>> On Fri, 25 Sep 2009 10:42:21 -0700 (PDT), NT wrote:
>>> On Sep 25, 6:01 pm, PeterC <giraffenos....@homecall.co.uk> wrote:
>>>> Need to get a bowsaw for use this Winter as the spinney at the
>>>> bottom of the garden has been advancing for a few years.
>>>> Nothing too big: there's an ash tree that's about 10cm thick and
>>>> will soon be tall enough to fall on the hose and some hawthorn of
>>>> similar size.
>>
>>> Bowsaws are quicker, but by the time you've gone and got one for
>>> such little wood, it would have been far quicker to get out a basic
>>> handsaw and do it. If you were doing a whole bunch of much bigger
>>> stuff then yes I'd get a bow.
>>
>>> NT
>>
>> I've done that but when one is up a tree and holding on with one
>> hand, the handsaw clogs up and gets stuck. I've other wood to cut up
>> as well, so I felt that a bowsaw would just be easier.
>
>
> Sounds good, if you like handsaws. I tend to use a circular for small
> trees these days,

Are you completely insane? How did you type that post without fingers?

John Rumm

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Sep 26, 2009, 12:04:34 PM9/26/09
to

That does not really sound like the best choice of tool IMHO....! Of the
powered options, a chainsaw or reciprocating saw seem most useful.

PeterC

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Sep 26, 2009, 12:21:23 PM9/26/09
to

Right, many thanks to all, I'll get one of these and leave the bowsaw until
I need one - if I do.

Steve Firth

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Sep 26, 2009, 12:39:14 PM9/26/09
to
PeterC <giraffe...@homecall.co.uk> wrote:

> On Sat, 26 Sep 2009 13:39:00 +0100, Steve Firth wrote:
>
> > PeterC <giraffe...@homecall.co.uk> wrote:
> >
> >> Look good. Would they manage 3" trunks?
> >
> > Easily. The blade is 24cm and they go through a 3-4 inch trunk like a
> > knife through hot butter. The only potential problem is sap making the
> > blade sticky and causing drag. You can prevent that by oiling the blade
> > before use and also by washing it in water from time to time.
>
> Right, many thanks to all, I'll get one of these and leave the bowsaw until
> I need one - if I do.

If you get one, remember that the blade is high carbon steel and doesn't
tolerate a lot of bending. Always pull and push in a straight line. With
practice you'll find out how much you can bend one of these blades
before they break. Doing so involves breaking a few blades,
unfortunately.

When you have finished with it, clean the blade with water. Dry it
throughly and then oil it. When you store it wrap the blade in oiled
newspaper. Tie the nespaper to the blade with string and then hang it up
in your shed or garage or wherever you store tools.

NT

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Sep 26, 2009, 1:17:10 PM9/26/09
to
On Sep 26, 4:24 pm, "The Medway Handyman"

I've got a cordless thats so lower powered that kickback is easily
held. It opens up new uses like plunge cutting and tree felling.


NT

Bill Wright

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Sep 26, 2009, 1:29:50 PM9/26/09
to

"NT" <meow...@care2.com> wrote in message
news:3b5b54fb-315c-4241...@p23g2000vbl.googlegroups.com...

You could sort out your piles with that if you were careful.

Bill


The Medway Handyman

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Sep 26, 2009, 4:07:07 PM9/26/09
to

<SHUDDER>

PeterC

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Sep 26, 2009, 5:10:16 PM9/26/09
to

Operations for those are getting expensive due to soaring costs.

PeterC

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Sep 26, 2009, 5:13:23 PM9/26/09
to

Thanks Steve, hadn't realised that (used to modern bendy tools). I learned
many fortnights ago that it's easier to let the tool do the work and guide
on the easiest path, but still break a blade occasionally due to assuming
that it's hardpoint.

I might use WD40 on it.

Harry Bloomfield

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Sep 26, 2009, 5:51:44 PM9/26/09
to
PeterC expressed precisely :

> As for spare blades, there's only this:
>
> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/63511
>
> which gets v. bad reviews. Given that a blade will wear out or break before

> I've done the job, what are the alternatives? I prefer somewhere local
> rather than on t'net, so a shed is likely.

I have had my bow saw for twenty odd years, it has helped in the
felling of several trees and lots of branches in that time. It has
never needed a new blade.

--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk


Andy Dingley

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Sep 27, 2009, 11:58:25 AM9/27/09
to
On 25 Sep, 18:01, PeterC <giraffenos....@homecall.co.uk> wrote:
> Need to get a bowsaw

Hardly use mine, as the frame gets in the way too much. So mostly I
use a folding pull saw.

My own is a Japanese Arse brand (yes, that's why I bought it!) and is
lovely. However Tesco have recently been selling some very good ones
for under a fiver - the trick is that the blade is taper-ground,
unlike most of the cheapies, so doesn't bind in wet timber.

Andy Dingley

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Sep 27, 2009, 11:59:52 AM9/27/09
to
On 25 Sep, 18:38, The Wanderer <the.wande...@gmx.co.uk> wrote:

> Why not try a local 'country' or farm store?

Because if it's like my one in Chepstow, it's green wellies for the
Rangie and horsebox set, and I can't even afford their catfood.

Admittedly Abergavenny's is a bit more sensible and sells foot-rot
cures for sheep.

Andy Dingley

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Sep 27, 2009, 12:03:43 PM9/27/09
to
On 26 Sep, 17:04, John Rumm <see.my.signat...@nowhere.null> wrote:

> That does not really sound like the best choice of tool IMHO....! Of the
> powered options, a chainsaw or reciprocating saw seem most useful.

I inherited (wouldn't have bought it full price!) a B&D Alligator
scissor-action chainsaw.

Up to its limits of needing a cable and only cutting 4" diameter, this
thing is brilliant (albeit ultimately pointless). Easy to use, much
easier / safer / lighter than another chainsaw, even electric, and
even quicker than the usual chainsaw as the jaws make it possible to
saw a branch overhead or unsupported.

For most stuff I'd prefer a hand saw (lightness) and 4" is quick
enough to hand saw anyway. If you don't fancy the effort, or your
lengthing felled branches, then it has its virtues.

PeterC

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Sep 27, 2009, 2:06:22 PM9/27/09
to

Damn! I was in Tescrot this p.m.

John Rumm

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Sep 27, 2009, 9:25:32 PM9/27/09
to

The other one I have found quite handy is a small pruning chain saw on
the end of a petrol trimmer, with an extension bar you can trim fairly
high stuff safely from the ground. There is also little danger of
kickback type accidents since the pole puts the dangerous bit well out
of reach. (just make sure you don't drop a branch on yourself!)

PeterC

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Sep 28, 2009, 4:35:46 AM9/28/09
to
On Mon, 28 Sep 2009 02:25:32 +0100, John Rumm wrote:

> Andy Dingley wrote:
>> On 26 Sep, 17:04, John Rumm <see.my.signat...@nowhere.null> wrote:
>>
>>> That does not really sound like the best choice of tool IMHO....! Of the
>>> powered options, a chainsaw or reciprocating saw seem most useful.
>>
>> I inherited (wouldn't have bought it full price!) a B&D Alligator
>> scissor-action chainsaw.
>>
>> Up to its limits of needing a cable and only cutting 4" diameter, this
>> thing is brilliant (albeit ultimately pointless). Easy to use, much
>> easier / safer / lighter than another chainsaw, even electric, and
>> even quicker than the usual chainsaw as the jaws make it possible to
>> saw a branch overhead or unsupported.
>>
>> For most stuff I'd prefer a hand saw (lightness) and 4" is quick
>> enough to hand saw anyway. If you don't fancy the effort, or your
>> lengthing felled branches, then it has its virtues.
>
> The other one I have found quite handy is a small pruning chain saw on
> the end of a petrol trimmer, with an extension bar you can trim fairly
> high stuff safely from the ground. There is also little danger of
> kickback type accidents since the pole puts the dangerous bit well out
> of reach. (just make sure you don't drop a branch on yourself!)

Not enough to warrant a powered tool and I prefer not to use them in the
garden anyway (mowing about 250m^2 is useful exercise).
I'll pop back to T's.

Dave Osborne

unread,
Sep 28, 2009, 8:06:35 AM9/28/09
to
Harry Bloomfield wrote:

>
> I have had my bow saw for twenty odd years, it has helped in the felling
> of several trees and lots of branches in that time. It has never needed
> a new blade.
>

<AOL>

Buy a Bahco (used to be called Sandvik) bow saw from your local garden
centre DIY shed or tool shop.

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