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Re: Old digital camera electronics drawing current?

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Lasse Langwadt

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Feb 21, 2024, 6:12:02 PMFeb 21
to
On 2/21/24 22:59, Peter wrote:
> I still use a Casio EX-Z60 compact camera from around 2005.
>
> The problem is it discharges the lithium battery within a couple of
> weeks when left (unused) on standby. It never used to do this.
>
> It is the same with a new replacement battery.
>
> Why is this? Is there something in the electronics (capacitors perhaps?)
> which degrade over time and cause a current drain?

after nearly 20 years it might be time to think about getting a new
camera ..

David Taylor

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Feb 22, 2024, 12:32:06 AMFeb 22
to
On 21/02/2024 21:59, Peter wrote:
> I still use a Casio EX-Z60 compact camera from around 2005.
>
> The problem is it discharges the lithium battery within a couple of
> weeks when left (unused) on standby. It never used to do this.
>
> It is the same with a new replacement battery.
>
> Why is this? Is there something in the electronics (capacitors perhaps?)
> which degrade over time and cause a current drain?

Peter,

If it didn't happen before, it /shouldn't/ happen now. Are you sure that there
is a physical on/off switch you've missed?

However, if the batteries are 19 years old they may be the problem rather than
anything in the camera itself. If the batteries are no longer being
manufactured what you buy as "new" may have been made many years ago, and long
past their working lifetime (3-5-7 years?).

Yes, there could be an age problem with the capacitors in the camera, but these
capacitors can sometimes "reform" if run with a steady voltage for some time.
Can you keep the camera on while the batteries are being charged, i.e. is there
in-camera charging?

Apart from the optical zoom, your phone camera my well be better.
--
Cheers,
David
Web: https://www.satsignal.eu

The Natural Philosopher

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Feb 22, 2024, 4:19:28 AMFeb 22
to
On 21/02/2024 21:59, Peter wrote:
> Is there something in the electronics (capacitors perhaps?)
> which degrade over time and cause a current drain?
Sadly, yes

--
"If you don’t read the news paper, you are un-informed. If you read the
news paper, you are mis-informed."

Mark Twain

Martin Brown

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Feb 22, 2024, 5:16:01 AMFeb 22
to
On 21/02/2024 21:59, Peter wrote:
> I still use a Casio EX-Z60 compact camera from around 2005.
>
> The problem is it discharges the lithium battery within a couple of
> weeks when left (unused) on standby. It never used to do this.

IF the battery is as old as the camera then I am surprised that it still
holds any charge at all. Lithium batteries typically last around 10-15
years or so in regular use if you look after them (and <2 years if abused).
>
> It is the same with a new replacement battery.

Then it is clearly something in the camera. Most likely would be some
contamination allowing leakage current to track from one terminal to the
other. It could also be that the circuit board is slightly hydroscopic
and moisture has made the whole thing leaky.
>
> Why is this? Is there something in the electronics (capacitors perhaps?)
> which degrade over time and cause a current drain?

Ageing circuitboards can develop cusious faults over 20 years due to
residual traces of flux and moisture ingress and capacitors failing.
(although the latter usually fail by losing capacitance or swelling up
and then leaking their vital fluids everywhere). The latter could well
explain your observation that there is continuous battery load.

--
Martin Brown

The Natural Philosopher

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Feb 22, 2024, 5:42:59 AMFeb 22
to
On 22/02/2024 10:15, Martin Brown wrote:
> Ageing circuitboards can develop cusious faults over 20 years due to
> residual traces of flux and moisture ingress and capacitors failing.
> (although the latter usually fail by losing capacitance or swelling up
> and then leaking their vital fluids everywhere). The latter could well
> explain your observation that there is continuous battery load.

Probably the most common fault in modern electronics is a teensy surface
mount ceramic capacitor shorting out. Or showing high leakage. There
aren't many electrolytics used these days at all.
Unless you have the time, the patience the kit and steady hands its not
worth it.

Can probably pick up a replacement camera on ebay for peanuts

--
“The urge to save humanity is almost always only a false face for the
urge to rule it.”
– H. L. Mencken

Tim+

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Feb 22, 2024, 6:14:42 AMFeb 22
to
Peter <p_b...@msn.com> wrote:
> I still use a Casio EX-Z60 compact camera from around 2005.
>
> The problem is it discharges the lithium battery within a couple of
> weeks when left (unused) on standby. It never used to do this.
>
> It is the same with a new replacement battery.
>
> Why is this? Is there something in the electronics (capacitors perhaps?)
> which degrade over time and cause a current drain?
>

Probably unfixable (economically). Have you tried just removing the battery
when not in use?

Tim

--
Please don't feed the trolls

Paul

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Feb 22, 2024, 9:29:20 AMFeb 22
to
On 2/21/2024 4:59 PM, Peter wrote:
> I still use a Casio EX-Z60 compact camera from around 2005.
>
> The problem is it discharges the lithium battery within a couple of
> weeks when left (unused) on standby. It never used to do this.
>
> It is the same with a new replacement battery.
>
> Why is this? Is there something in the electronics (capacitors perhaps?)
> which degrade over time and cause a current drain?
>

I have a device here, with 4000 series CMOS in it.

One day, it started playing games.

The circuit, is an "auto-off" circuit.

Well, unfortunately, it uses capacitors to time
a ten minute interval (film caps, not electrolytics).
And something about those acted up, causing the
power switching circuit to malfunction and drain the battery.

I don't know what exactly fixed it. I had removed
the battery for a week or so, hoping leakage currents
would drain any portions of the circuit not working
properly. That didn't help. But maybe some transient
of putting the battery in and removing it, reset something.

It's been several years since that happened, and the
auto-off has been fine the whole time.

*******

Note that, cameras in the past, contained an RTC (real time clock).
Sometimes this is based on a second smaller battery. I've had one
old digital camera (Kodak), the *instant* I attempted to use the
menu item to adjust the time setting, the screen went black
and the camera never started ever again. As they say,
shit happens. Some sort of planned obsolescence I would
guess. I would not mind working on it, but at the time,
I googled my ass off, and absolutely nobody has taken
one apart, or noted any foibles. I have no hints where to start.
And with some cameras, there are all sorts of things that
you cannot be careless with. They're designed as a trap
for the unwary. That's why I won't venture in, without
at least a little documentation.

Paul
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