Difference between kitchen and bathroom fan?

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David W.E. Roberts

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Aug 4, 2007, 11:47:16 AM8/4/07
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Hi,

bought a Manrose 150mm/6" extractor fan from Screwfix to use in the kitchen.

Having finally (after a week of man flu) got round to opening the package I
see that the fan is labelled "For Bathrooms and Toilets".

So what is the difference?

Is a kitchen fan a higher extraction rate?

This is rated at up to 230m3 per hour.

TIA

Dave R

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The Medway Handyman

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Aug 4, 2007, 12:15:43 PM8/4/07
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Could it be that bathroom fans are designed to cope with more moist air?


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David W.E. Roberts

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Aug 4, 2007, 12:18:07 PM8/4/07
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"The Medway Handyman" <davi...@nospamblueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
news:f928nl$qs0$1...@registered.motzarella.org...

> David W.E. Roberts wrote:
> > Hi,
> >
> > bought a Manrose 150mm/6" extractor fan from Screwfix to use in the
> > kitchen.
> >
> > Having finally (after a week of man flu) got round to opening the
> > package I see that the fan is labelled "For Bathrooms and Toilets".
> >
> > So what is the difference?
> >
> > Is a kitchen fan a higher extraction rate?
> >
> > This is rated at up to 230m3 per hour.
>
> Could it be that bathroom fans are designed to cope with more moist air?

...or kitchen fans can cope with more airborne fat?


meow...@care2.com

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Aug 4, 2007, 12:31:45 PM8/4/07
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I dont know either, but would expect noise. Brief bathroom exposure to
noise is one thing, but continuous noise in the kitchen would not be
tolerated.


NT

Andrew Gabriel

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Aug 4, 2007, 1:21:16 PM8/4/07
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In article <1186245105.8...@w3g2000hsg.googlegroups.com>,

meow...@care2.com writes:
> On 4 Aug, 16:47, "David W.E. Roberts" <nos...@talk21.com> wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> bought a Manrose 150mm/6" extractor fan from Screwfix to use in the kitchen.
>>
>> Having finally (after a week of man flu) got round to opening the package I
>> see that the fan is labelled "For Bathrooms and Toilets".
>>
>> So what is the difference?
>>
>> Is a kitchen fan a higher extraction rate?
>>
>> This is rated at up to 230m3 per hour.
>
> I dont know either, but would expect noise. Brief bathroom exposure to
> noise is one thing, but continuous noise in the kitchen would not be
> tolerated.

Bathroom one will need to be IP24 or better for fitting in zones.
Kitchen one has less stringent requirements, and would just have
to be IP2X like any other appliance anywhere else.

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Lurch

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Aug 4, 2007, 1:38:16 PM8/4/07
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On Sat, 4 Aug 2007 17:18:07 +0100, "David W.E. Roberts"
<nos...@talk21.com> mused:

Or neither. Stop guessing.
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ARWadsworth

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Aug 4, 2007, 3:49:20 PM8/4/07
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"David W.E. Roberts" <nos...@talk21.com> wrote in message
news:5hjn5vF...@mid.individual.net...

http://www.manrose.co.uk/

and then "fan selector guide"

Adam


The Natural Philosopher

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Aug 4, 2007, 5:33:30 PM8/4/07
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Bigger mainly.
IIRC 170 l/m is the lowest a kitchen fan can be. I forget. I did check
it out and big ones were kosher for the kitchen little ones for the bogs.

Hugo Nebula

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Aug 5, 2007, 6:22:44 AM8/5/07
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On Sat, 4 Aug 2007 16:47:16 +0100, a particular chimpanzee, "David
W.E. Roberts" <nos...@talk21.com> randomly hit the keyboard and
produced:

>bought a Manrose 150mm/6" extractor fan from Screwfix to use in the kitchen.
>
>Having finally (after a week of man flu) got round to opening the package I
>see that the fan is labelled "For Bathrooms and Toilets".

>This is rated at up to 230m3 per hour.

230m^3/hr equates to 63.9 litres/second, which is only just over the
minimum requirement [1] for a kitchen fan of 60 litres/sec (unless
it's in a cooker hood or directly over the hob). Once you start
adding in the resistance of any ducting into that, you could quickly
end up with a fan that might not meet Building Regulations [1].

[1] Assuming this is a new or extended kitchen, otherwise there is no
requirement to meet any particular extract rate.
--
Hugo Nebula
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just how far from the pack have you strayed?"

Bingo

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Mar 2, 2018, 8:14:06 AM3/2/18
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replying to David W.E. Roberts, Bingo wrote:
The bathroom one is on a timer switch, the kitchen one you turn on and off
manually! Simple!

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for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/uk-diy/difference-between-kitchen-and-bathroom-fan-414497-.htm


Fredxx

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Mar 2, 2018, 9:09:18 AM3/2/18
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On 02/03/2018 13:14, Bingo wrote:
> replying to David W.E. Roberts, Bingo wrote:
> The bathroom one is on a timer switch, the kitchen one you turn on and off
> manually! Simple!

Some context would help. This is usenet and you're posting through a
broken website.


This might assist you with posting to a newsgroup, albeit through a website:
https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1855

- If you are sending a reply to a message or a posting be sure you
summarize the original at the top of the message, or include just
enough text of the original to give a context.


Brian Gaff

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Mar 2, 2018, 10:45:18 AM3/2/18
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How old is this one?
Brian

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David

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Mar 2, 2018, 12:36:45 PM3/2/18
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On Fri, 02 Mar 2018 13:14:02 +0000, Bingo wrote:

> replying to David W.E. Roberts, Bingo wrote:
> The bathroom one is on a timer switch, the kitchen one you turn on and
> off manually! Simple!

Ah, memories.

Shame the very late reply is a load of bollocks, though.

Cheers


Dave R


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Vir Campestris

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Mar 2, 2018, 3:48:17 PM3/2/18
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On 02/03/2018 14:16, Brian Gaff wrote:
> How old is this one?

2007.

Brian-Gaff

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Mar 2, 2018, 10:00:51 PM3/2/18
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Hmm, it has to be that sorting on their site ignores years for some weird
reason, maybe the forums have a way of archiving every year on dead threads,
but of course this would be unlikely to workon usenet.
Brian

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Amanda Electrics

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Mar 31, 2018, 11:14:07 AM3/31/18
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replying to Bingo, Amanda Electrics wrote:
yeah, that's not really accurate. You can buy bathroom ones without a timer
function. The difference is generally the size of the ducting which allows a
greater extraction rate for what would be expected to be a larger room.

ARW

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Mar 31, 2018, 1:24:36 PM3/31/18
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On 31/03/2018 16:14, Amanda Electrics wrote:
> replying to Bingo, Amanda Electrics wrote:
> yeah, that's not really accurate.  You can buy bathroom ones without a
> timer
> function.  The difference is generally the size of the ducting which
> allows a
> greater extraction rate for what would be expected to be a larger room.
>

How big are your tits?

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Max Demian

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Apr 1, 2018, 9:31:31 AM4/1/18
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On 02/03/2018 13:14, Bingo wrote:
> replying to David W.E. Roberts, Bingo wrote:
> The bathroom one is on a timer switch, the kitchen one you turn on and off
> manually! Simple!

A timer is only relevant for an internal bathroom where you have to turn
the light on to use it - the fan comes on and stays on for five minutes
or so after you leave. For a bathroom with a window you want one that
you turn on manually, preferably a two speed job so you can leave it on
low (and quiet) most of the time and only turn it to full (and noisy)
when required. Suus cuique crepitus bene olet.

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