plumbing up cast iron radiator

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andyv

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Dec 22, 2008, 1:51:23 PM12/22/08
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I have rashly gone and bought an old cast iron radiator which I think
will look good in my old house, but I didn't carefully examine it
first. It's got two threaded fittings which appear to be cast iron
either side at the base. I'm presuming I can go out and buy modern
brass valves which will screw into these.

I'm concerned about the threaded fitting on one side since half of the
hexagonal nut used to tighten it up has snapped off. I don't want to
use any more force than necessary to get it out, that's if it will
come out. Any tips?

Roger Mills

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Dec 22, 2008, 2:58:26 PM12/22/08
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
andyv <ave...@fastmail.fm> wrote:

Fancy posting a picture somewhere?

Modern radiators invariably have 1/2" BSP threads, and valves are also 1/2"
BSP, so that the tails screw straight in.

Old cast iron radiators usually have larger threads - maybe 1" or 1 1/2"
BSP - so you'll need to find out what size they actually are, and use an
adaptor. You'll obviously need to remove whatever is currently screwed in.
If it's badly mangled, try holding it (the fitting) in a vice, and rotating
the whole rad to unscrew it. [May need two people, if it's heavy!]
--
Cheers,
Roger
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Andrew Mawson

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Dec 22, 2008, 2:58:48 PM12/22/08
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"andyv" <ave...@fastmail.fm> wrote in message
news:eb5328ac-7a9f-4dc3...@i24g2000prf.googlegroups.com...

The 'native' thread in the cast iron rads will be 2" BSP female.
Remove any fittings screwed in and get a 2" to 1/2" reducer bush which
takes you to modern radiator size.

AWEM

geraldthehamster

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Dec 22, 2008, 6:49:28 PM12/22/08
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On 22 Dec, 19:58, "Roger Mills" <watt.ty...@googlemail.com> wrote:

> If it's badly mangled, try holding it (the fitting) in a vice, and rotating
> the whole rad to unscrew it. [May need two people, if it's heavy!]

*If* it's heavy! My God ;-)


Regards
Richard


meow...@care2.com

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Dec 22, 2008, 8:48:28 PM12/22/08
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Putting little modern pipes into it is obviously going to look crp. To
make it look sensible you'll need to use original size pluimbing down
to the floorboards, under there you can convert to 15/22/whatever. And
obviously any attached bits of plumbing that can be repaired/used
should be if possible.

Beware of leaks between the iron sections. If leaky its time for car
head gasket & hermetite. And dont even think about not bolting the
thing to the wall or floor.


NT

ransley

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Dec 23, 2008, 5:15:09 AM12/23/08
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Used radiators need to be leak tested before install

Ed Sirett

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Dec 23, 2008, 6:21:37 PM12/23/08
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If this is a sealed system then you will be adding significantly to the
total system volume. One might be OK but a few radiators will soon leavinf
you with the need for an additional expansion vessel.

A picture would help as there are a number of reproduction units around
which are not quite the same as the original types.

--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk
Gas fitting FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/GasFitting.html
Sealed CH FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/SealedCH.html
Choosing a Boiler FAQ http://www.makewrite.demon.co.uk/BoilerChoice.html

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