Tin openers

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Tim Decker

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Sep 13, 2008, 5:50:09 PM9/13/08
to
Has anyone else been having problems with opening tins? We found it
really hard to open tins with a previous tin opener. So I got an old
fashioned butterfly one and this didn't work very well, so bought
another from Asda (35p) and found this didn't work. Finally went to
John Lewis and paid for an expensive one (£7) and have now found this
doesn't work properly.

This made me think that maybe the manufacture of tinned goods has
changed slightly.

Rod

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Sep 13, 2008, 5:59:47 PM9/13/08
to

We have a Culinare SafetyCan 2 opener. Has an interestingly slightly
different mechanism - works OK. Not noticed anything very different
recently. Mind, the rims of cans seem a bit neater/thinner than they
used to be - are they welded rather than soldered these days?

--
Rod

Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
onset.
Although common it frequently goes undiagnosed.
<www.thyromind.info> <www.thyroiduk.org> <www.altsupportthyroid.org>

George

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Sep 13, 2008, 6:04:49 PM9/13/08
to

"Tim Decker" <deck...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:7ed3115e-a5d6-4801...@l42g2000hsc.googlegroups.com...

Forget the new fangled gimmicks and use an old fasioned "stab and cut" maual
one.
You'll prolly find them in a pound shop or chandlers.

Harry Bloomfield

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Sep 13, 2008, 6:13:08 PM9/13/08
to
Tim Decker formulated the question :

> Has anyone else been having problems with opening tins? We found it
> really hard to open tins with a previous tin opener. So I got an old
> fashioned butterfly one and this didn't work very well, so bought
> another from Asda (35p) and found this didn't work. Finally went to
> John Lewis and paid for an expensive one (£7) and have now found this
> doesn't work properly.

Our seem to work at first but they soon stop working.

>
> This made me think that maybe the manufacture of tinned goods has
> changed slightly.

The folded over lip does seem to be thinner. As a standby I keep a
really simple tin opener which is intended for camping etc. and fits on
a key ring. It is made from two bits of flat metal, one hooks onto the
rim of the tin, the other is the blade hinged onto the first. I have
had it for over twenty years on my car keys and it never fails to work.
They might be called 'The Little Nipper' or similar. Most camping type
stores will probably have them.

--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk


Appin

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Sep 13, 2008, 6:18:36 PM9/13/08
to
The message <6j2renF...@mid.individual.net>
from Rod <poly...@ntlworld.com> contains these words:

> Tim Decker wrote:
> > Has anyone else been having problems with opening tins? We found it
> > really hard to open tins with a previous tin opener. So I got an old
> > fashioned butterfly one and this didn't work very well, so bought
> > another from Asda (35p) and found this didn't work. Finally went to
> > John Lewis and paid for an expensive one (£7) and have now found this
> > doesn't work properly.
> >
> > This made me think that maybe the manufacture of tinned goods has
> > changed slightly.

> We have a Culinare SafetyCan 2 opener. Has an interestingly slightly
> different mechanism - works OK. Not noticed anything very different
> recently. Mind, the rims of cans seem a bit neater/thinner than they
> used to be - are they welded rather than soldered these days?

Many (but not all) cans are now made so that you're expected to to make
a horizontal cut just under the rim, rather than a vertical cut inside
the rim.

Buy an appropriate design of modern opener, make sure it's a quality one
and use it in accordance with the design of the can.

Bruce

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Sep 13, 2008, 6:41:02 PM9/13/08
to
Tim Decker <deck...@gmail.com> wrote:


I think it probably has. The "lift off" style of can opener which
cuts the side of the can under the rim with a circular blade seems
better suited than a traditional opener with a fixed blade and a hand
driven cog wheel.

I have both these types, however my favourite can opener is one that
resembles the lift off type in form, but has a safety cutter that cuts
through the rim itself. It only ever takes one go to open the can,
and the top is easily lifted off leaving no sharp edges at all.

I wish I had bought two, because I cannot remember where I bought it
from and will need a replacement one day.


John

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Sep 13, 2008, 6:44:22 PM9/13/08
to

"George" <lo...@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
news:5OWyk.57331$E41....@text.news.virginmedia.com...
Then cut yourself on the jagged edges!


George

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Sep 13, 2008, 6:48:49 PM9/13/08
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"John" <Who90...@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:enXyk.27683$2f5....@newsfe18.ams2...

Are you accident prone then?


George

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Sep 13, 2008, 6:57:20 PM9/13/08
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"Tim Decker" <deck...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:7ed3115e-a5d6-4801...@l42g2000hsc.googlegroups.com...

Faultless opens a tin every time had one like this for 16 years,twas my
mothers...few and far between now this type.

http://tinyurl.com/66ex9u


Derek Geldard

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Sep 13, 2008, 7:03:34 PM9/13/08
to
On Sat, 13 Sep 2008 22:59:47 +0100, Rod <poly...@ntlworld.com>
wrote:

>Tim Decker wrote:
>> Has anyone else been having problems with opening tins? We found it
>> really hard to open tins with a previous tin opener. So I got an old
>> fashioned butterfly one and this didn't work very well, so bought
>> another from Asda (35p) and found this didn't work. Finally went to
>> John Lewis and paid for an expensive one (£7) and have now found this
>> doesn't work properly.
>>
>> This made me think that maybe the manufacture of tinned goods has
>> changed slightly.
>
>We have a Culinare SafetyCan 2 opener. Has an interestingly slightly
>different mechanism - works OK. Not noticed anything very different
>recently. Mind, the rims of cans seem a bit neater/thinner than they
>used to be - are they welded rather than soldered these days?

Not AFAIK

Like everything else just made thinner / cheaper.

derek

Derek Geldard

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Sep 13, 2008, 7:14:23 PM9/13/08
to
On Sat, 13 Sep 2008 23:13:08 +0100, Harry Bloomfield
<harry...@NOSPAM.tiscali.co.uk> wrote:

>Tim Decker formulated the question :
>> Has anyone else been having problems with opening tins? We found it
>> really hard to open tins with a previous tin opener. So I got an old
>> fashioned butterfly one and this didn't work very well, so bought
>> another from Asda (35p) and found this didn't work. Finally went to
>> John Lewis and paid for an expensive one (£7) and have now found this
>> doesn't work properly.
>
>Our seem to work at first but they soon stop working.
>
>>
>> This made me think that maybe the manufacture of tinned goods has
>> changed slightly.
>
>The folded over lip does seem to be thinner. As a standby I keep a
>really simple tin opener which is intended for camping etc. and fits on
>a key ring. It is made from two bits of flat metal, one hooks onto the
>rim of the tin, the other is the blade hinged onto the first. I have
>had it for over twenty years on my car keys and it never fails to work.
>They might be called 'The Little Nipper'

That was a mouse / rat trap. ;-)

>or similar. Most camping type
>stores will probably have them.

Derek

Ian

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Sep 13, 2008, 7:27:31 PM9/13/08
to

"Tim Decker" <deck...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:7ed3115e-a5d6-4801...@l42g2000hsc.googlegroups.com...

Maybe you have a bit of a weak wrist! I use an electric tin opener for the
tins that don't have a ring on them. The only problem I see is for left
handed people.
I'm amazed you think a £7 one with a name is better than any other.
I bet you have been ripped off so many times!


Colin Wilson

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Sep 13, 2008, 8:11:03 PM9/13/08
to
> Has anyone else been having problems with opening tins?

I bought a cheap Ikea one a few months ago - works great, although a
little bit fiddly to locate on the rim until you get used to it.

The Medway Handyman

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Sep 13, 2008, 10:23:47 PM9/13/08
to
Tim Decker wrote:
> Has anyone else been having problems with opening tins? We found it
> really hard to open tins with a previous tin opener. So I got an old
> fashioned butterfly one and this didn't work very well, so bought
> another from Asda (35p) and found this didn't work. Finally went to
> John Lewis and paid for an expensive one (£7) and have now found this
> doesn't work properly.

Angle grinder :-)


--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk


Message has been deleted

Rod

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Sep 14, 2008, 3:04:35 AM9/14/08
to

Which is much more likely nowadays. Instead of touching the cad and lid
just once (to pour out the contents and drop the empty in the bin), we
are expected to rinse off both lid and can and bin them separately.

I certainly have cut myself on cans due to this method of opening.
Accident prone? Maybe. Trying where sensible to avoid wickedly nasty
sharp edges? Yes, definitely.

Rod

unread,
Sep 14, 2008, 3:36:38 AM9/14/08
to
Which is much more likely nowadays. We are expected to rinse off both
lid and can and bin them separately. This might involve several
additional handlings.

Andrew Gabriel

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Sep 14, 2008, 4:09:24 AM9/14/08
to
In article <a3goc45nrl882lijd...@4ax.com>,

Bruce <n...@nospam.net> writes:
> I think it probably has. The "lift off" style of can opener which
> cuts the side of the can under the rim with a circular blade seems
> better suited than a traditional opener with a fixed blade and a hand
> driven cog wheel.
>
> I have both these types, however my favourite can opener is one that
> resembles the lift off type in form, but has a safety cutter that cuts
> through the rim itself. It only ever takes one go to open the can,
> and the top is easily lifted off leaving no sharp edges at all.

When I was looking for an opener suitable for a frail person,
I though one of these looked ideal. It wasn't though. Removing
the upper rim loses the upper rigidity of the can, and she
couldn't then pick up the can without squashing it, resulting
in spill over and possible dropping.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]

Harry Bloomfield

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Sep 14, 2008, 4:28:06 AM9/14/08
to
Derek Geldard wrote :

>> They might be called 'The Little Nipper'
>
> That was a mouse / rat trap. ;-)

You are correct.

The opener I had in mind was one of these...

Ebay item 280263482172

Jeremy Nicoll - news posts

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Sep 14, 2008, 4:26:47 AM9/14/08
to
and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

> When I was looking for an opener suitable for a frail person,
> I though one of these looked ideal. It wasn't though. Removing
> the upper rim loses the upper rigidity of the can, and she
> couldn't then pick up the can without squashing it, resulting
> in spill over and possible dropping.

Yes, if you just try to grasp opposite sides of the tin.

You could eg place the tin on a plate, perhaps a largish soup-plate first,
and plan to upset it as soon as it is open.

Or place it on a chopping board, open it, then slide it off the board so one
can get one's hand under it as well as gripping part of the side of the can.

--
Jeremy C B Nicoll - my opinions are my own.

The Medway Handyman

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Sep 14, 2008, 4:34:12 AM9/14/08
to

Hi Tim

Not planning on performing 'Pineapple Surprise' or 'Peaches' are you :-)

I had trouble finding ours, most cans seem to be ring pulls nowadays. Ours
is a cheap white plastic jobby marked 'WL Housewares' no idea where it came
from but it seems to work OK.

Lakeland do one appropriately called a 'Magician Auto' which has a good
write up and a lifetime guarantee for £8:99 - worth a try, most of their
stuff 'does what it says on the tin' so to speak.

There's a Lakeland at Bluewater.

Jeremy Nicoll - news posts

unread,
Sep 14, 2008, 5:18:18 AM9/14/08
to
Jeremy Nicoll - news posts <jn.nntp....@wingsandbeaks.org.uk> wrote:

> and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:
>
> > When I was looking for an opener suitable for a frail person,

I forgot to suggest looking at shops that sell things for disabled / elderly
people...

Mary Fisher

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Sep 14, 2008, 5:21:02 AM9/14/08
to

"Tim Decker" <deck...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:7ed3115e-a5d6-4801...@l42g2000hsc.googlegroups.com...

I very rarely use canned foods but on the one occasion I did and there
wasn't a ring pull (which I have difficulty with) the main problem was
finding the tin opener.

When I did neither of us could remember how to use it ...

Mary


Bruce

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Sep 14, 2008, 7:03:12 AM9/14/08
to
and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:


Perhaps I wasn't clear, because it doesn't take off the rim. It cuts
*through* the rim. Slightly less than half of the rim goes with the
lid, leaving slightly more than half of it in place on the can. There
is therefore no significant loss of rigidity.

I think the one you bought was probably a "lift off" type, which makes
a cut below the rim and leaves an unsupported edge. I have a couple
of those, but I don't like them because they tend to encourage
spilling some of the can's contents through making a cut lower down.

Phil L

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Sep 14, 2008, 9:35:43 AM9/14/08
to

I've used an electric can opener for about 15 years now, I think it cost
around £6.

It's a kenwood, like this one:
http://www.spb-holdings.net/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=6017&currency=GBP

If you type electric can opener into google and click 'shopping', you will
have loads of them starting from about £8.

No effort, hands free, clean edges, magentic lid holder, it's a no-brainer
really


--
Phil L
RSRL Tipster Of The Year 2008


dennis@home

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Sep 14, 2008, 12:01:47 PM9/14/08
to

"Appin" <ap...@zetnet.co.uk> wrote in message
news:3130303036363...@zetnet.co.uk...


> The message <6j2renF...@mid.individual.net>
> from Rod <poly...@ntlworld.com> contains these words:
>
>> Tim Decker wrote:
>> > Has anyone else been having problems with opening tins? We found it
>> > really hard to open tins with a previous tin opener. So I got an old
>> > fashioned butterfly one and this didn't work very well, so bought
>> > another from Asda (35p) and found this didn't work. Finally went to
>> > John Lewis and paid for an expensive one (£7) and have now found this
>> > doesn't work properly.
>> >
>> > This made me think that maybe the manufacture of tinned goods has
>> > changed slightly.
>
>> We have a Culinare SafetyCan 2 opener. Has an interestingly slightly
>> different mechanism - works OK. Not noticed anything very different
>> recently. Mind, the rims of cans seem a bit neater/thinner than they
>> used to be - are they welded rather than soldered these days?
>
> Many (but not all) cans are now made so that you're expected to to make
> a horizontal cut just under the rim, rather than a vertical cut inside
> the rim.

So you can have a sharp can rather than a sharp lid.. no thanks.

>
> Buy an appropriate design of modern opener, make sure it's a quality one
> and use it in accordance with the design of the can.

If you buy one of the cheap lidl/aldi safety can opener they slice through
the actual rim at the top.
This leaves a lid without sharp edges and a can without sharp edges.

You can even put the lid back on if you only use half the can and it seals
quite well.

dennis@home

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Sep 14, 2008, 12:24:23 PM9/14/08
to

"Andrew Gabriel" <and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:48ccc6b4$0$510$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk...

You have the wrong type.. the ones that cut through the rim leave half the
rim on the lid and half on the can.

There are a lot of so called safety openers that claim to leave no sharp
edges on the lid, but leave them on the can instead. The proper ones don't
leave sharp edges on either.

However for someone who is frail you need an electric one.

dennis@home

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Sep 14, 2008, 12:29:45 PM9/14/08
to

"Andrew Gabriel" <and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:48ccc6b4$0$510$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk...

> When I was looking for an opener suitable for a frail person,

Maybe ebay item 120170467565

john...@hotmail.com

unread,
Sep 14, 2008, 12:32:12 PM9/14/08
to

>Derek Geldard wrote :
>>> They might be called 'The Little Nipper'
>>
>> That was a mouse / rat trap. ;-)
>
>You are correct.
>
>The opener I had in mind was one of these...
>
>Ebay item 280263482172

P-38.


Owain

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Sep 14, 2008, 12:08:02 PM9/14/08
to
Bruce wrote:
> I have both these types, however my favourite can opener is one that
> resembles the lift off type in form, but has a safety cutter that cuts
> through the rim itself. It only ever takes one go to open the can,
> and the top is easily lifted off leaving no sharp edges at all.
> I wish I had bought two, because I cannot remember where I bought it
> from and will need a replacement one day.

It sounds like one sold on QVC, usually with a German bloke guest
presenting.

Owain


Derek Geldard

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Sep 14, 2008, 2:03:47 PM9/14/08
to

It's on the website now with a video demo. At least i think he's
German (they definitely avoided mentioning the war).

House-Ware 4 Piece Complete Kitchen Opener & Pourer Set

Item Number 828233

Introductory Price £16.45

reduced from £18 .

Bruce

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Sep 14, 2008, 3:34:46 PM9/14/08
to
Derek Geldard <im...@miniac.demon.co.uk> wrote:


That isn't the same opener I have - mine looks more like the "lift
off" type, but the QVC one cuts in exactly the same place, leaving a
still-rigid can with no sharp edges.

The other items are nice too, but the whole lot is quite expensive at
£20.40 including P&P. QVC is rarely cheap.

Phil Addison

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Sep 14, 2008, 5:20:39 PM9/14/08
to

Do you have anything to contribute to the question to hand? We really
aren't interested in your memory problems.

Phil

Phil Addison

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Sep 14, 2008, 5:28:27 PM9/14/08
to

No *not* really. I have one of those and it leaves sharp edges on the
lid, not *that* sharpe, but still requires care with the lid. However,
the worst thing about it is that the magnet attachment and the blade are
a bugger to clean; loads of nasty crevices. Surely there must be a
better make? oh, and this one has a gadget on the back for grinding away
your kitchen knives.

Phil

Dave Liquorice

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Sep 15, 2008, 4:49:26 AM9/15/08
to
On Sat, 13 Sep 2008 23:13:08 +0100, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

> It is made from two bits of flat metal, one hooks onto the rim of the
> tin, the other is the blade hinged onto the first. I have had it for
> over twenty years on my car keys and it never fails to work.

As you say always works but you do have to be careful as fingers are
rather close to sharp bits of tin, especially when the lid is nearly off.

In todays nanny state I'm surprised you can still get them as there must
be figures showing that 2 people a year get a nasty cut (not requiring
stitches) when using one.

--
Cheers
Dave.

Dave Liquorice

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Sep 15, 2008, 4:41:45 AM9/15/08
to
On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 20:34:46 +0100, Bruce wrote:

> That isn't the same opener I have - mine looks more like the "lift
> off" type, but the QVC one cuts in exactly the same place, leaving a
> still-rigid can with no sharp edges.

We have and ancient "lift off" type. It cuts the side of the can below the
rim but the top edge of the can is sharp. How does this QVC deal with the
top edge of the can to leave "no sharp edges"?

--
Cheers
Dave.

Dave Liquorice

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Sep 15, 2008, 4:56:34 AM9/15/08
to
On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 08:04:35 +0100, Rod wrote:

> Which is much more likely nowadays. Instead of touching the cad and lid
> just once (to pour out the contents and drop the empty in the bin),

Yuk, not even rinsed so it goes all manky in the bin?

> we are expected to rinse off both lid and can and bin them separately.

What? Can't you put the (metal) lid in with the (same metal) tin for
recycling? A 2l ice cream tub takes our tins and tin lids, tins a rinsed
and flattened before be placed in there.

> I certainly have cut myself on cans due to this method of opening.
> Accident prone? Maybe. Trying where sensible to avoid wickedly nasty
> sharp edges? Yes, definitely.

So have I both from the fold out type of opener and our lift off one. I'm
intrigued by this "cut through the rim" type. We sort of need a new tin
opener as I said earlier it is ancient (20 years or more old) and the
surface of the plastic handles is starting to fail.

--
Cheers
Dave.

Mary Fisher

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Sep 15, 2008, 5:30:03 AM9/15/08
to

"Phil Addison" <edi...@diyfaq.org.uk> wrote in message
news:f30rc45g3essd2cce...@4ax.com...

> No *not* really. I have one of those and it leaves sharp edges on the
> lid, not *that* sharpe, but still requires care with the lid. However,
> the worst thing about it is that the magnet attachment and the blade are
> a bugger to clean; loads of nasty crevices. Surely there must be a
> better make? oh, and this one has a gadget on the back for grinding away
> your kitchen knives.

How very interesting.
>
> Phil


The Natural Philosopher

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Sep 15, 2008, 5:41:51 AM9/15/08
to
Dave Liquorice wrote:
> On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 08:04:35 +0100, Rod wrote:
>
>> Which is much more likely nowadays. Instead of touching the cad and lid
>> just once (to pour out the contents and drop the empty in the bin),
>
> Yuk, not even rinsed so it goes all manky in the bin?

Sure. Shve it in the landfill bin.

Let nature take care of the yuk, and then when we need the metal, we can
mine the landfills.

Bruce

unread,
Sep 15, 2008, 6:44:19 AM9/15/08
to
"Dave Liquorice" <allsortsn...@howhill.com> wrote:


It cuts through the rim, not the side of the can.

I'm not sure exactly how, but it seems to exploit a line of weakness
in the rim which is presumably the joint where the lid is put on when
the can has been filled. But I'm only guessing.

There certainly isn't even a trace of a sharp edge left behind, either
on the lid or on the rim of the can.

If I hadn't bought one of these can openers and seen how it works,
leaving no sharp edges, I think I would have found it very difficult
to believe. But it does work exactly as claimed.

(At least mine does. It is slightly different to the QVC version but
obviously uses the same principle.)

Rod

unread,
Sep 15, 2008, 7:32:59 AM9/15/08
to
Dave Liquorice wrote:
> On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 08:04:35 +0100, Rod wrote:
>
>> Which is much more likely nowadays. Instead of touching the cad and lid
>> just once (to pour out the contents and drop the empty in the bin),
>
> Yuk, not even rinsed so it goes all manky in the bin?
>
If it's collected frequently enough, is the food left on a can any worse
than the other stuff that ends up in the bin? I used to make a token
effort - but with fortnightly collections and being not supposed to wrap
things in the can bin, more thorough effort is required.

>> we are expected to rinse off both lid and can and bin them separately.
>
> What? Can't you put the (metal) lid in with the (same metal) tin for
> recycling? A 2l ice cream tub takes our tins and tin lids, tins a rinsed
> and flattened before be placed in there.
>

Hands up! I should obviously have phrased that to be "separately to
other (non-can) rubbish)". I have never made any effort to squash cans
because the collecting box we have is ample for the containers we
collect without doing so. (And will still last four weeks, i.e. allowing
a forgotten-to-put-the-damn-thing-out week.)

>> I certainly have cut myself on cans due to this method of opening.
>> Accident prone? Maybe. Trying where sensible to avoid wickedly nasty
>> sharp edges? Yes, definitely.
>
> So have I both from the fold out type of opener and our lift off one. I'm
> intrigued by this "cut through the rim" type. We sort of need a new tin
> opener as I said earlier it is ancient (20 years or more old) and the
> surface of the plastic handles is starting to fail.
>

I have never had any significant problem with the camping type opener
(as described earlier). And no problem at all with the 'cut through the
rim' styles. Some are much better on the small cans (tomato paste,
pilchards) than other types of opener.

meow...@care2.com

unread,
Sep 15, 2008, 8:47:15 AM9/15/08
to
On Sep 14, 10:28 pm, Phil Addison <edi...@diyfaq.org.uk> wrote:
> On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 13:35:43 GMT, in uk.d-i-y "Phil L"
>
>
>
> <neverchec...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> > Tim Decker wrote:
> > > Has anyone else been having problems with opening tins?  We found it
> > > really hard to open tins with a previous tin opener. So I got an old
> > > fashioned butterfly one and this didn't work very well, so bought
> > > another from Asda (35p) and found this didn't work. Finally went to
> > > John Lewis and paid for an expensive one (£7) and have now found this
> > > doesn't work properly.
>
> > > This made me think that maybe the manufacture of tinned goods has
> > > changed slightly.
>
> > I've used an electric can opener for about 15 years now, I think it cost
> > around £6.
>
> > It's a kenwood, like this one:
> >http://www.spb-holdings.net/index.php?main_page=product_info&products...

>
> > If you type electric can opener into google and click 'shopping', you will
> > have loads of them starting from about £8.
>
> > No effort, hands free, clean edges, magentic lid holder, it's a no-brainer
> > really
>
> No *not* really. I have one of those and it leaves sharp edges on the
> lid, not *that* sharpe, but still requires care with the lid. However,
> the worst thing about it is that the magnet attachment and the blade are
> a bugger to clean; loads of nasty crevices. Surely there must be a
> better make? oh, and this one has a gadget on the back for grinding away
> your kitchen knives.
>
> Phil

Although I'm not generally a fan of bloat, and an electric motor on a
can opener 10x the size does at first sight look like bloat, reality
is these things do make opening cans much easier. Cleaning the handle
part is effortless if you have a dishwasher, if not then a hot soak is
wanted. If not cleaned now and then the mank gets into the handle
mechanism and jams the cutter in the up position so it wont open
anything.

The built in grinder is a waste of time, not that I expected
otherwise.

Some people seem to have truoble with getting the tin in the right
position, if its too far over one way it wont work.


NT

PS the manual type that slice through the side take less work than the
top cutters, as the metal's thinner. But the result is a wobbly can
with sharp edges and no drip edge - so basically for people with mild
hand problems.


NT

Dave Liquorice

unread,
Sep 15, 2008, 9:05:48 AM9/15/08
to
On Mon, 15 Sep 2008 12:32:59 +0100, Rod wrote:

>> Yuk, not even rinsed so it goes all manky in the bin?
>
> If it's collected frequently enough, is the food left on a can any worse
> than the other stuff that ends up in the bin?

Well nothing goes in our landfill bin that will rot, *anything* that will
rot goes to the composter out back. Tins, paper and glass end up in the
green box for the council recycling truck. Plastic bottles and films are
taken to a recycling bank when we go shopping, same with card and juice
cartons.

There is very little going into our landfill bin most is metalised plastic
films as they can't be recycled and other household waste like the hoover
contents. If we managed to get 1/2 a bag full in a week we have thrown a
lot of stuff out...

>> What? Can't you put the (metal) lid in with the (same metal) tin for
>> recycling?
>

> Hands up! I should obviously have phrased that to be "separately to
> other (non-can) rubbish)".

B-)

> I have never made any effort to squash cans because the collecting box
> we have is ample for the containers we collect without doing so.

The green box lives outside and 2l ice cream tubs sit nicely in an old
vegetable trolly thing for tins, small hard plastic bits (caps, ring pulls
etc) and foil.

--
Cheers
Dave.

Rod

unread,
Sep 15, 2008, 10:49:51 AM9/15/08
to

Understood about "nothing goes in our landfill bin that will rot", my
reference to not washing cans out was really prior to the recycling systems.

I guess it is individual household arrangements. We find it easier to
take stuff out more or less as we go.

(Really helpful these council systems - our cans/plastics container is
black, green is for paper/card! Isn't there a BS colour coding?)

dennis@home

unread,
Sep 15, 2008, 2:30:25 PM9/15/08
to

"Dave Liquorice" <allsortsn...@howhill.com> wrote in message
news:nyyfbegfubjuvyypb...@srv1.howhill.net...


> There is very little going into our landfill bin most is metalised plastic
> films as they can't be recycled and other household waste like the hoover
> contents.

Vacuum waste usually goes on the compost heap, maybe you don't have wool
carpets?

Message has been deleted
Message has been deleted

dennis@home

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Sep 16, 2008, 8:49:05 AM9/16/08
to

"Huge" <Hu...@nowhere.much.invalid> wrote in message
news:gao4tt$40s$8...@anubis.demon.co.uk...


> On 2008-09-15, Dave Liquorice <allsortsn...@howhill.com> wrote:
>> On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 08:04:35 +0100, Rod wrote:
>>
>>> Which is much more likely nowadays. Instead of touching the cad and lid
>>> just once (to pour out the contents and drop the empty in the bin),
>>
>> Yuk, not even rinsed so it goes all manky in the bin?
>

> You waste drinking water on rinsing your rubbish? Why?

Because you get pests if you drop unwashed tins in the recycling box.

Dave Liquorice

unread,
Sep 17, 2008, 7:17:53 PM9/17/08
to
On 16 Sep 2008 11:22:37 GMT, Huge wrote:

>> Yuk, not even rinsed so it goes all manky in the bin?
>

> You waste drinking water on rinsing your rubbish? Why?

I wouldn't like to drink the water I use to rinse cans etc, it's just been
used to do the washing up and is about to tipped down the drain...

Reason? So you don't get a house full of fruit flys or 'orrible stench of
rotting food?

--
Cheers
Dave.

Dave Liquorice

unread,
Sep 17, 2008, 7:22:14 PM9/17/08
to
On Mon, 15 Sep 2008 19:30:25 +0100, dennis@home wrote:

> Vacuum waste usually goes on the compost heap, maybe you don't have wool
> carpets?

Don't know what they are, they came with the house. More to the point most
of the contents of the hover wouldn't make it into the composter, the wind
would grab 'em and distribute them over me and the fells. As it is I have
to pick a calm day to empty the thing or you end up covered in your own,
and the rest of the families, skin again...

--
Cheers
Dave.

Dave Liquorice

unread,
Sep 17, 2008, 7:28:07 PM9/17/08
to
On Mon, 15 Sep 2008 15:49:51 +0100, Rod wrote:

> I guess it is individual household arrangements. We find it easier to
> take stuff out more or less as we go.

If we did that it wouldn't stay there, the wind would have it away. The
green box even with a brick in it has been known to take a walk down the
road and thats starting from one of the most sheltered spots on the lee
side. There is nothing loose lying around up here, loose stuff simply
doesn't stay put.

--
Cheers
Dave.

Message has been deleted

Bruce

unread,
Sep 20, 2008, 6:28:02 PM9/20/08
to
Bruce <n...@nospam.net> wrote:

>and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:
>
>>In article <a3goc45nrl882lijd...@4ax.com>,
>> Bruce <n...@nospam.net> writes:
>>> I think it probably has. The "lift off" style of can opener which
>>> cuts the side of the can under the rim with a circular blade seems
>>> better suited than a traditional opener with a fixed blade and a hand
>>> driven cog wheel.

>>>
>>> I have both these types, however my favourite can opener is one that
>>> resembles the lift off type in form, but has a safety cutter that cuts
>>> through the rim itself. It only ever takes one go to open the can,
>>> and the top is easily lifted off leaving no sharp edges at all.
>>

>>When I was looking for an opener suitable for a frail person,

>>I though one of these looked ideal. It wasn't though. Removing
>>the upper rim loses the upper rigidity of the can, and she
>>couldn't then pick up the can without squashing it, resulting
>>in spill over and possible dropping.
>
>
>Perhaps I wasn't clear, because it doesn't take off the rim. It cuts
>*through* the rim. Slightly less than half of the rim goes with the
>lid, leaving slightly more than half of it in place on the can. There
>is therefore no significant loss of rigidity.
>
>I think the one you bought was probably a "lift off" type, which makes
>a cut below the rim and leaves an unsupported edge. I have a couple
>of those, but I don't like them because they tend to encourage
>spilling some of the can's contents through making a cut lower down.


At last (!) I have found one like mine on eBay:

http://tinyurl.com/4tz5px
or
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=120298863766

I recommend it very highly.

Rod

unread,
Sep 21, 2008, 3:49:47 AM9/21/08
to

Always found Kuhn Rikon stuff to be pretty well made.

Due to this thread, I decided to test my can opener (branded Culinare)
by opening the small end of a corned beef can. The very small radius
corners are a real challenge. Worked perfectly. Close examination of the
cut showed, exactly as reported by Bruce, that the cut leaves a bit of
rim on the main can and a bit on the removed lid.

Bruce

unread,
Sep 21, 2008, 6:55:07 AM9/21/08
to
Rod <poly...@ntlworld.com> wrote:

>Bruce wrote:
>> At last (!) I have found one like mine on eBay:
>>
>> http://tinyurl.com/4tz5px
>> or
>> http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=120298863766
>>
>> I recommend it very highly.
>>
>
>Always found Kuhn Rikon stuff to be pretty well made.
>
>Due to this thread, I decided to test my can opener (branded Culinare)
>by opening the small end of a corned beef can. The very small radius
>corners are a real challenge. Worked perfectly. Close examination of the
>cut showed, exactly as reported by Bruce, that the cut leaves a bit of
>rim on the main can and a bit on the removed lid.


Thanks Rod.

Phil Addison

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Sep 21, 2008, 9:57:29 AM9/21/08
to

Rod

unread,
Sep 21, 2008, 10:06:52 AM9/21/08
to

Yes, that looks to be the one we have got.

Generally works very well. Just occasionally I have to cut round a bit
of an overlap - i.e. full circle plus a quarter. It clamps onto the can
well.

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