Curtain linings for insulation

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ss

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May 27, 2012, 5:45:03 PM5/27/12
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In debate at the moment regarding curtain linings.
The curtains are lighweight and will have a seperate lining, now there
is a choice of normal lining (whatever that is) and insulation quality
lining. In the real world is this likely to make any significant gain in
terms of heat loss around windows, assuming they will actually be
closed. The insulation (linings) ones are double the cost of the
standard linings.

The Natural Philosopher

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May 27, 2012, 6:08:28 PM5/27/12
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ss wrote:
> In debate at the moment regarding curtain linings.
> The curtains are lighweight and will have a seperate lining, now there
> is a choice of normal lining (whatever that is) and insulation quality
> lining. In the real world is this likely to make any significant gain in
> terms of heat loss around windows, assuming they will actually be
> closed.

absolutely

The insulation (linings) ones are double the cost of the
> standard linings.


We have heavy brocade, insulating interlining and a UV resistant final
lining. As far as I can tell a single glazed window with these is BETTER
than double glazed/no curtains.
.

--
To people who know nothing, anything is possible.
To people who know too much, it is a sad fact
that they know how little is really possible -
and how hard it is to achieve it.

NT

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May 27, 2012, 6:58:11 PM5/27/12
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On May 27, 11:08 pm, The Natural Philosopher <t...@invalid.invalid>
wrote:
> ss wrote:
> > In debate at the moment regarding curtain linings.
> > The curtains are lighweight and will have a seperate lining, now there
> > is a choice of normal lining (whatever that is) and insulation quality
> > lining. In the real world is this likely to make any significant gain in
> > terms of heat loss around windows, assuming they will actually be
> > closed.
>
> absolutely
>
> The insulation (linings) ones are double the cost of the
>
> > standard linings.
>
> We have heavy brocade, insulating interlining and a UV resistant final
> lining. As far as I can tell a single glazed window with these is BETTER
> than double glazed/no curtains.

the gap between the layers insulates, so the plain lining plus a layer
or 2 of pretty well anything between them gets good insulation. I'd
pick something relatively slippery for a middle layer.


NT

The Natural Philosopher

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May 27, 2012, 8:47:49 PM5/27/12
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Its a custom made loose polyester..its not a weave - its a sort of thin
layer of random fibres like the sort of padding you stitch into a parka
etc. Drapers stock it.

Thermal interlining?


http://www.merrick-day.com/acatalog/Polyester_Wadding.html


that's the stuff. Cheap as chips really.


> NT

NT

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May 28, 2012, 6:40:50 AM5/28/12
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On May 28, 1:47 am, The Natural Philosopher <t...@invalid.invalid>
Looks like a plan!


NT

Grimly Curmudgeon

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May 28, 2012, 10:12:31 AM5/28/12
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Well yes, it works to an extent.
What I find really works is to have the curtains tucked down either
behind the rad under the window (but women tend to get all fussy about
that) or behind a lower upside-down pelmet affair at the bottom.
My principle is that the cold air in the window box should be
contained and prevented from spilling out.

Dave Liquorice

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May 28, 2012, 6:03:49 PM5/28/12
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On Mon, 28 May 2012 15:12:31 +0100, Grimly Curmudgeon wrote:

> What I find really works is to have the curtains tucked down either
> behind the rad under the window (but women tend to get all fussy about
> that)

Odd that considering they are the ones that complain about the cold
draft across the floor from the cold air falling off the windows. I
tuck the lined curtains behind the radiator, makes one heck of a
difference to the room. When you open the curtains you can feel the
cold air behind them pour out.

Also if the heating is on the rising warm air is guided into the room
not into and trapped in the window reveal. It will come out at the
top but it is restricted and you have really warm air next to the
cold glass. Unless you have nice deep reveals and have a second set
of curtains right next to the window.

--
Cheers
Dave.



Dave Liquorice

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May 28, 2012, 6:05:07 PM5/28/12
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On Sun, 27 May 2012 23:08:28 +0100, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

> As far as I can tell a single glazed window with these is BETTER
> than double glazed/no curtains.

In broad terms I'd go along with that but two sets of good lined
curtains and double glazing is even better. B-)

--
Cheers
Dave.



NT

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May 28, 2012, 6:36:25 PM5/28/12
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On May 28, 11:03 pm, "Dave Liquorice"
That 2nd set can be nothing more than plastic film with light rope
along the bottom so it hangs ok, fitted very near the glass. If you
want you can put clear on one end of the rod, and silvered mylar on
the other, then you can have insulation in winter and reduced solar
gain in summer :)


NT

The Natural Philosopher

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May 28, 2012, 7:08:52 PM5/28/12
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And adding shutters is even better!

Dave Liquorice

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May 29, 2012, 4:34:46 AM5/29/12
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On Tue, 29 May 2012 00:08:52 +0100, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

>>> As far as I can tell a single glazed window with these is BETTER
>>> than double glazed/no curtains.
>>
>> In broad terms I'd go along with that but two sets of good lined
>> curtains and double glazing is even better. B-)
>
> And adding shutters is even better!

Q 'arry.

Bricking the window opeing up with a double cavity insulated wall
would be even better. B-) Shutters are going a bit to far in this
country, it doesn't get hot enough for them to be require to keep
heat out or cold enough to keep heat in.

--
Cheers
Dave.



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