Wallpaper stripping wiki - update proposal...

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Tim S

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Apr 2, 2009, 8:02:05 PM4/2/09
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Hi,

Been promising this for a while, but having stripped most of a house, I feel
able to add something that hopefully will help others. If anyone would like
to add or correct anything before I make this live, please feel free to
suggest stuff, otherwise I'll whack it up.

Ignore the wiki-markup - I'll fix any errors here on upload.

Starting with the current Wiki, I'm proposing to update to this:

Cheers

Tim

===Steamer===
* Makes a wet mess [ed: I personally didn't find this an issue - do we want
to keep this?]
* Can be very useful on stubborn cheap vinyls that don't peel dry and
painted paper (especially ceiling paper).
* Fills the locality with a lot of water vapour - best done in spring or
summer when windows can be opened, if possible.

===Wallwik sheets===
* Use your own sprayer with them
* [http://www.wallwik-uk.com/products/wallpaper-removal-sheets.html Wallwik
supplier]
* Possible (untested) replacement for wallwik sheets: lining paper

===Sprayer===
* Use warm [[water]] & [[detergent]]
* Less messy.
* The best sprayer for large areas of work, if you don't mind a bit of a
mess, is a pump up garden sprayer - very quick and easy, especially on
papered ceilings and paper on bare plaster, both of which can require a lot
of water due to the absorbancy of the plaster.
* Don't forget to flush your garden sprayer out several times if you've used
evil gardening chemicals in it previously.
* A fine mist spray makes less mess than a coarse spray, but whatever you do
will make the floor wet. Best to lay plastic or turn the heating up and
open some windows.
# Spray a section
# Wait 5-15 minutes (if paper is looking dryer rather than wetter then it's
time to respray)
# Respray the section
# Wait 15 minutes
The paper should come off easily.

===Vinyl paper===
The vinyl surface is waterproof, and the [[adhesive]] only comes away when
wet. There are 2 ways to enable this to happen:
# Peel off the top vinyl layer. Many, but not all papers are designed for
this to be done. Likely to be a feature of the better quality papers. tart
in a corner and pull gently, at at least 90 degrees and if possible, try to
pull off parallel to the wall - if you're lucky, it will come off in one
sheet.
# If the previous attempt to peel fails, then you will need to scarify the
vinyl layer to allow the penetration of water and/or steam. A bladed roller
tool is available to do this in several formats. Without trying to plug any
particular product brand, the type with 3 spikey rollers that you just push
and drag around is a fast and efficient device.
# Scarified paper may be fairly easily removed with steam. Steam the first
corner (top or bottom) for a good minute, then carefully (it's hot!) try to
pick up the corner of the vinyl. If you are very luck, it and the backing
paper will start top lift as one. If not, hopefully, at least the (thin)
vinyl will start to peel. Move the steam onto the next section and apply
gentle pulling force onto the bit you lifted. With care, you should be able
to keep peeling very slowly with the steamer staying in advance of the
section you're peeling. If the paper is very low quality, or old, it may
tend to tear or break. If this happens, try a stripping knife instead of a
peeling action.
# Any remaining backing paper is fairly easily dealt with. It can be steamed
off in a second pass using a stripping knife, but this takes longer due to
the paper absorbing the steam - it needs to actually become wet. A quicker,
though messier approach is to follow the sprayer instructions above, or to
sponge on hot water from a bucket. If the paper is sufficiently wetted in
typically 2-3 passes, for at least 10-15 minutes, it may peel off in one
piece, or it will yield fairly easily to a stipping knife. Wetter the
better is the key to success.

===Painted non vinyl paper===
Typically this would be painted lining or textured paper (wall or ceiling).
# Steam can work very well on this type of paper, depending on how many
coats of emulsion there are. For one or two coats of emulsion, scarifying
is not always necessary. If it's been painted many times or with gloss
paint, scarifying may help, prior to the application of steam or copious
hot water.

===Cleaning the walls afterwards===
Just when you thought stripping was the most boring messy tedious job in the
world... Now you have to remove the glue residue.
# Hot water - as hot as you can stand, and lots of it. A drop of Flash or
similar does no harm. Good large rough and robust floorcloths too - lot's
of 'em. A tea trolley helps, to keep the bucket at a convenient height for
the upper parts of the walls and ceilings.
# Paper over painted plaster: the glue should wash off fairly easily. Apply
broad strokes with a very wet cloth to wet the glue. Do this over a good
couple of yards of wall to give the water time to work. A second pass
should see most of the glue coming off.
# Paper over bare plaster: This can be harder as the plaster tends to hold
the glue plaster well, and defeats the water by sucking it up. Based on
various suggestions from uk.d-i-y USENET group, I found a sharp bladed long
handled scraper helped (3" razor sharp blade, handle about 12" long).
Wet about 1/2 square meter/yard with either the cloth or a sprayer. Have a
quick coffee (10 minutes), then wet again, until it's almost dripping. Now
push (or pull) the blade at a fairly shallow angle in a single pass. If
you're lucky, 90% of the paste gunk will come off and pile up on the blade.
Rinse the blade in the bucket of hot water and do the next 3" strip. This
works best on good hard flat plaster. If the plaster is less even, and you
find you are missing hollows, try 1/2 blade width passes with on overlap.
After you've scraped a section about a yard wide and a foot or two deep, put
the blade down and use the floorcloth to wash the remainder of the glue
off. With any luck, if scraping was effective, this will need perhaps 3-4
passes, with a fair bit of rubbing on one or two. If you run your finger
over the wet surface you will feel if it's slimy or not. Not slimy is
perfect - no glue left. Very slimy and you need to wash more. Slightly
slimy - you need to decide if it's good enough. If you are going to paper
again, a little past is unlikely to matter. But if your are painting, it
would be best to remove as much glue as reasonably practical.

==See Also==
* [[Special:Allpages|Wiki Contents]]
* [[Special:Categories|Wiki Subject Categories]]

[[Category:Decorating]]

Tim S

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Apr 2, 2009, 8:09:14 PM4/2/09
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Tim S coughed up some electrons that declared:

BTW - don;t worry about silly typos and spelling - I'll stick it though a
spell checker - bit tired but wanted to get it going...

brass monkey

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Apr 2, 2009, 8:19:49 PM4/2/09
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"Tim S" <t...@dionic.net> wrote in message
news:49d553aa$0$513$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk...

> Tim S coughed up some electrons that declared:
>
> BTW - don;t worry about silly typos and spelling - I'll stick it though a
> spell checker - bit tired but wanted to get it going...
>
It also needs a section on wood-chip, !"£$%£"% stuff.


Tim S

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Apr 2, 2009, 8:23:34 PM4/2/09
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brass monkey coughed up some electrons that declared:

I haven't (thankfully) had the pleasure.

Do you have any tips - I'm happy to write them in?

Or shall I just put it in a section under "Angle grinder"...

Cheers

Tim

brass monkey

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Apr 2, 2009, 8:26:36 PM4/2/09
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"Tim S" <t...@dionic.net> wrote in message
news:49d55706$0$513$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk...

Angle grinder covers it, it's been half-stripped for months :(


meow...@care2.com

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Apr 2, 2009, 8:44:40 PM4/2/09
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Tim S wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Been promising this for a while, but having stripped most of a house, I feel
> able to add something that hopefully will help others. If anyone would like
> to add or correct anything before I make this live, please feel free to
> suggest stuff, otherwise I'll whack it up.
>
> Ignore the wiki-markup - I'll fix any errors here on upload.

Great job. I'll ask a couple of qs re some of the smaller details...


> Starting with the current Wiki, I'm proposing to update to this:
>
> Cheers
>
> Tim
>
> ===Steamer===
> * Makes a wet mess [ed: I personally didn't find this an issue - do we want
> to keep this?]

I can see it being an issue in some situations, such as around wiring.
It may seem dumb but people do do things without thinking them
through, so the brief caution can be handy. In fact adding a short
section on electrical safety when stripping might be useful.


> * Can be very useful on stubborn cheap vinyls that don't peel dry and
> painted paper (especially ceiling paper).
> * Fills the locality with a lot of water vapour - best done in spring or
> summer when windows can be opened, if possible.
>
> ===Wallwik sheets===
> * Use your own sprayer with them
> * [http://www.wallwik-uk.com/products/wallpaper-removal-sheets.html Wallwik
> supplier]
> * Possible (untested) replacement for wallwik sheets: lining paper
>
> ===Sprayer===
> * Use warm [[water]] & [[detergent]]
> * Less messy.
> * The best sprayer for large areas of work, if you don't mind a bit of a
> mess, is a pump up garden sprayer - very quick and easy, especially on

Just one question here. Have you really tried every possible sprayer
type, including eg hvlp paint sprayers, vacuum cleaner sprayers? If
not it might be best to say 'good' rather than 'best'

> papered ceilings and paper on bare plaster, both of which can require a lot
> of water due to the absorbancy of the plaster.
> * Don't forget to flush your garden sprayer out several times if you've used
> evil gardening chemicals in it previously.

should one use such a sprayer at all? I've always been taught one
shouldn't, in horticulture a separate sprayer is always used for the
toxic stuff.

Are you sure? Youre only going to put more glue on in most cases.


A fine job


NT

John Rumm

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Apr 2, 2009, 9:20:48 PM4/2/09
to

It hold no fear for me!

As long as you have the one vital tool - a proper *sharp* scraper:

http://www.screwfix.com/prods/16530/Decorating-Sundries/Decorators-Knives/Heavy-Duty-Scraper

then even painted wood chip comes off easily enough. Either scrape off
in one hit, or more likely, scrape once which scars the surface (the
wood chips make it easy for the scraper to slice lumps off). The wet and
wait, finally the rest comes off much like ordinary paper.

--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\=================================================================/

Dave Liquorice

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Apr 3, 2009, 3:56:40 AM4/3/09
to
On Thu, 2 Apr 2009 17:44:40 -0700 (PDT), meow...@care2.com wrote:

>> ===Steamer===
>> * Makes a wet mess [ed: I personally didn't find this an issue - do we
>> want to keep this?]

IMHO makes a much less wet mess than traditional soaking. Steam stripped
paper is damp when it comes off but has far less moisture in it than
soaked, I find by the time you have gone round a room (faster than the
trad. method) the first strippings are almost dry. Because of this don't
leave little bits where you don't want 'em or they'll restick themselves.

Yes the room does become very humid so open windows open a little are
useful.

> It may seem dumb but people do do things without thinking them
> through, so the brief caution can be handy. In fact adding a short
> section on electrical safety when stripping might be useful.

Agreed, particulary if using the soak method with water running down the
walls.

--
Cheers
Dave.

Tim S

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Apr 3, 2009, 3:18:05 AM4/3/09
to
meow...@care2.com coughed up some electrons that declared:

<snip>


>> ===Steamer===
>> * Makes a wet mess [ed: I personally didn't find this an issue - do we
>> want to keep this?]
>
> I can see it being an issue in some situations, such as around wiring.
> It may seem dumb but people do do things without thinking them
> through, so the brief caution can be handy. In fact adding a short
> section on electrical safety when stripping might be useful.

Good point. I did some stripping around my temporary CU, and right up to
lights and sockets - I was careful, so you're right, deserved a mention.

<snip>

>> ===Sprayer===
>> * Use warm [[water]] & [[detergent]]
>> * Less messy.
>> * The best sprayer for large areas of work, if you don't mind a bit of a
>> mess, is a pump up garden sprayer - very quick and easy, especially on
>
> Just one question here. Have you really tried every possible sprayer
> type, including eg hvlp paint sprayers, vacuum cleaner sprayers? If
> not it might be best to say 'good' rather than 'best'

OK - "good" it is.



>> papered ceilings and paper on bare plaster, both of which can require a
>> lot of water due to the absorbancy of the plaster.
>> * Don't forget to flush your garden sprayer out several times if you've
>> used evil gardening chemicals in it previously.
>
> should one use such a sprayer at all? I've always been taught one
> shouldn't, in horticulture a separate sprayer is always used for the
> toxic stuff.

I'll change it to a reminder, something like: "Caution: have you used the
sprayer for evil chemicals that you don't want to be breathing?" or
something along those lines. Leave it to the user to decide how to handle
it.

I've sprayed weedkiller with mine, washed it several times with hot water
and haven't died yet - but it's not really this Wiki's job to advise on
that.

>> ===Cleaning the walls afterwards===
>> Just when you thought stripping was the most boring messy tedious job in
>> the world... Now you have to remove the glue residue.
>
> Are you sure? Youre only going to put more glue on in most cases.

Fair point. I'm stuck in the "my POV" syndrome - I'm painting mine.
Could preface it with: "If you need to clean the glue off, eg because you
plan to paint".

Thanks for the advice.

Cheers

Tim

Tim S

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Apr 3, 2009, 3:18:47 AM4/3/09
to
John Rumm coughed up some electrons that declared:

> brass monkey wrote:
>> "Tim S" <t...@dionic.net> wrote in message
>> news:49d553aa$0$513$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk...
>>> Tim S coughed up some electrons that declared:
>>>
>>> BTW - don;t worry about silly typos and spelling - I'll stick it though
>>> a spell checker - bit tired but wanted to get it going...
>>>
>> It also needs a section on wood-chip, !"£$%£"% stuff.
>
> It hold no fear for me!
>
> As long as you have the one vital tool - a proper *sharp* scraper:
>
>
http://www.screwfix.com/prods/16530/Decorating-Sundries/Decorators-Knives/Heavy-Duty-Scraper

That's what I used for glue removal.

>
> then even painted wood chip comes off easily enough. Either scrape off
> in one hit, or more likely, scrape once which scars the surface (the
> wood chips make it easy for the scraper to slice lumps off). The wet and
> wait, finally the rest comes off much like ordinary paper.
>

Can I incorporate that, John?

Cheers

Tim

The Medway Handyman

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Apr 3, 2009, 3:20:10 AM4/3/09
to
John Rumm wrote:
> brass monkey wrote:
>> "Tim S" <t...@dionic.net> wrote in message
>> news:49d553aa$0$513$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk...
>>> Tim S coughed up some electrons that declared:
>>>
>>> BTW - don;t worry about silly typos and spelling - I'll stick it
>>> though a spell checker - bit tired but wanted to get it going...
>>>
>> It also needs a section on wood-chip, !"£$%£"% stuff.
>
> It hold no fear for me!
>
> As long as you have the one vital tool - a proper *sharp* scraper:
>
> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/16530/Decorating-Sundries/Decorators-Knives/Heavy-Duty-Scraper

The 6" one is a thing of great beauty.... you could take stripes off zebras
with one.


--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk


fred

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Apr 3, 2009, 4:04:03 AM4/3/09
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In article <nyyfbegfubjuvyypb...@srv1.howhill.net>, Dave
Liquorice <allsortsn...@howhill.com> writes

>On Thu, 2 Apr 2009 17:44:40 -0700 (PDT), meow...@care2.com wrote:
>
>>> ===Steamer===
>>> * Makes a wet mess [ed: I personally didn't find this an issue - do we
>>> want to keep this?]
>
>IMHO makes a much less wet mess than traditional soaking. Steam stripped
>paper is damp when it comes off but has far less moisture in it than
>soaked, I find by the time you have gone round a room (faster than the
>trad. method) the first strippings are almost dry. Because of this don't
>leave little bits where you don't want 'em or they'll restick themselves.
>
Agreed, I wouldn't use anything but a steam stripper when removing
wallpaper. I've found it to be the fastest and least tiring method of
all that I've tried.

>Yes the room does become very humid so open windows open a little are
>useful.
>

I'm happy to keep the room a bit steamy to start it working on the rest
of the room. As you say, any excess can be relieved by opening windows
whatever the season.
--
fred
BBC3, ITV2/3/4, channels going to the DOGs

Chris J Dixon

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Apr 3, 2009, 4:17:03 AM4/3/09
to
Tim S wrote:

>===Steamer===
>* Makes a wet mess [ed: I personally didn't find this an issue - do we want
>to keep this?]
>* Can be very useful on stubborn cheap vinyls that don't peel dry and
>painted paper (especially ceiling paper).
>* Fills the locality with a lot of water vapour - best done in spring or
>summer when windows can be opened, if possible.
>

I can certainly recommend a steamer and scarifier for painted
woodchip, but even then it was necessary to rub down afterwards
to get rid of all the particles.

One further caution is to keep the steamer on the move. The
longer it lingers, the greater the chance of the plaster blowing.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
ch...@cdixon.me.uk

Have dancing shoes, will ceilidh.

Andrew Gabriel

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Apr 3, 2009, 4:17:51 AM4/3/09
to
In article <49d551fd$0$506$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk>,

Tim S <t...@dionic.net> writes:
> Hi,
>
> Been promising this for a while, but having stripped most of a house, I feel
> able to add something that hopefully will help others. If anyone would like
> to add or correct anything before I make this live, please feel free to
> suggest stuff, otherwise I'll whack it up.
>
> Ignore the wiki-markup - I'll fix any errors here on upload.
>
> Starting with the current Wiki, I'm proposing to update to this:

It's missing the technique I have mentioned a few times here,
after discovering by accident.

Wet the paper and leave to soak through. I do this with the
steamer, without making any attempt to pull the paper off.
Leave for at least an hour. (When I first discovered this,
I had actually left it for over 12 hours, but subsequent
practice shows that length of time isn't necessary unless
the paper has been heavily painted.)

Then go over with the steam stripper again, starting with the
corners of each sheet. The steam will cause the moisture in
the paper to boil, and blow the paper off the wall. Normally
each sheet comes off effortlessly as one whole clean sheet,
which even look reusable, although I never have!

If you have a second person, they should follow along behind
you cleaning the residual glue off, which is very easy just
after the paper has been removed, but becomes more difficult
if it gets a chance to dry again. I use warm sugar soap.

You could try using a water spray, wet sponge or other method
for initially wetting the paper. I don't know if it would do
so as well as the steam does.

Another tip -- don't score the paper unless/until you've
found that you really can't get water to penetrate it without
doing so, and that includes leaving it a day to do so. If
you do end up scoring it, that makes it much less likely to
come away in full sheets, so removal becomes more fiddly,
and you can find afterwards that you've damage the plaster
behind.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]

Tim S

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Apr 3, 2009, 4:27:30 AM4/3/09
to
Chris J Dixon coughed up some electrons that declared:

> Tim S wrote:
>
>>===Steamer===
>>* Makes a wet mess [ed: I personally didn't find this an issue - do we
>>want to keep this?]
>>* Can be very useful on stubborn cheap vinyls that don't peel dry and
>>painted paper (especially ceiling paper).
>>* Fills the locality with a lot of water vapour - best done in spring or
>>summer when windows can be opened, if possible.
>>
> I can certainly recommend a steamer and scarifier for painted
> woodchip, but even then it was necessary to rub down afterwards
> to get rid of all the particles.
>
> One further caution is to keep the steamer on the move. The
> longer it lingers, the greater the chance of the plaster blowing.
>
> Chris

Excellent - I'll add it all in for tonight's edit :)

Where I'll also attempt to spell and punctuate correctly(!)

Not exactly an exciting Wiki topic - so I'm very pleased with all the
suggestions. Thanks!

Cheers

Tim

Tim S

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Apr 3, 2009, 4:30:15 AM4/3/09
to
Andrew Gabriel coughed up some electrons that declared:

And excellent suggestion. I'll include that.

> Another tip -- don't score the paper unless/until you've
> found that you really can't get water to penetrate it without
> doing so, and that includes leaving it a day to do so. If
> you do end up scoring it, that makes it much less likely to
> come away in full sheets, so removal becomes more fiddly,
> and you can find afterwards that you've damage the plaster
> behind.

Yes, I noticed that too.

Cheers

Tim


Cicero

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Apr 3, 2009, 4:39:57 AM4/3/09
to

=========================================

When stripping walls (as opposed to ceilings) I start at the top with a
sprayer going around the whole room or a single long wall. I then strip as
much as possible at the top of the wall leaving ragged edges to the
remaining paper. Next, I go around again spraying just above the ragged
edges and the effect of this is that the water running down tends to run
behind the still attached paper causing less run-off onto the floor and
softening the paper as it runs down between paper and plaster.

Cic.

--
==========================================
Using Ubuntu Linux
Windows shown the door
==========================================

Andrew Gabriel

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Apr 3, 2009, 5:10:57 AM4/3/09
to
In article <8EBv9IAzLc1JFwRv@y.z>,

fred <n...@for.mail> writes:
> I'm happy to keep the room a bit steamy to start it working on the rest
> of the room. As you say, any excess can be relieved by opening windows
> whatever the season.

That reminds me -- the steam is likely to set off any nearby
smoke detectors. For detectors which are part of a fire alarm
system, I find that a disposable latex rubber glove slips
over perfectly, and the "hand" dangling from the ceiling is
a really obvious reminder that you've disabled the alarm,
and you must never leave it in this state if you leave the
area. For home smoke detectors, they're mostly too big for
a glove, so you can try wrapping and taping a plastic freezer
bag round it, although getting a good enough seal on them is
not easy; I've had then still go off sometimes. Again, never
leave the bag on when you leave the immediate area, and
definitely not overnight. You are probably at increased risk
of fire whilst decorating is going on.

Tim S

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Apr 3, 2009, 5:15:28 AM4/3/09
to
Cicero coughed up some electrons that declared:

> On Fri, 03 Apr 2009 01:09:14 +0100, Tim S wrote:
>
>> Tim S coughed up some electrons that declared:
>>
>> BTW - don;t worry about silly typos and spelling - I'll stick it though a
>> spell checker - bit tired but wanted to get it going...
>
> =========================================
>
> When stripping walls (as opposed to ceilings) I start at the top with a
> sprayer going around the whole room or a single long wall. I then strip as
> much as possible at the top of the wall leaving ragged edges to the
> remaining paper. Next, I go around again spraying just above the ragged
> edges and the effect of this is that the water running down tends to run
> behind the still attached paper causing less run-off onto the floor and
> softening the paper as it runs down between paper and plaster.
>
> Cic.
>

Good tip. I'll mention it, as my method made the floor into a pond.

Cheers

Tim

Mark

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Apr 3, 2009, 5:11:05 AM4/3/09
to
On Fri, 03 Apr 2009 02:20:48 +0100, John Rumm
<see.my.s...@nowhere.null> wrote:

>brass monkey wrote:
>> "Tim S" <t...@dionic.net> wrote in message
>> news:49d553aa$0$513$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk...
>>> Tim S coughed up some electrons that declared:
>>>
>>> BTW - don;t worry about silly typos and spelling - I'll stick it though a
>>> spell checker - bit tired but wanted to get it going...
>>>
>> It also needs a section on wood-chip, !"£$%£"% stuff.
>
>It hold no fear for me!
>
>As long as you have the one vital tool - a proper *sharp* scraper:
>
>http://www.screwfix.com/prods/16530/Decorating-Sundries/Decorators-Knives/Heavy-Duty-Scraper
>
>then even painted wood chip comes off easily enough. Either scrape off
>in one hit, or more likely, scrape once which scars the surface (the
>wood chips make it easy for the scraper to slice lumps off). The wet and
>wait, finally the rest comes off much like ordinary paper.

I've had success with an ordinary scraper and steamer to remove
painted woodchip (spit) paper. Using a scarifying tool first helps.

--
(\__/) M.
(='.'=) Owing to the amount of spam posted via googlegroups and
(")_(") their inaction to the problem. I am blocking most articles
posted from there. If you wish your postings to be seen by
everyone you will need use a different method of posting.

Tim S

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Apr 3, 2009, 5:21:05 AM4/3/09
to
Andrew Gabriel coughed up some electrons that declared:


Good point - especially if doing this in an office and you set the whole
fire alarm system off.

You can get proper orange/red caps for the commercial detectors which I
think is preferred as it's obvious to everyone that it's still on.

I'll add this with a side note about not capping off commercial detectors
without consulting the local fire officer and not leaving any capping on
when not required, in any location.

Cheers

Tim

meow...@care2.com

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Apr 3, 2009, 7:24:58 AM4/3/09
to

If you're a tenant, beware of doing this. Disabling fire detection
equipment can have major financial consequences if a fire occurs, you
could be held liable, check your contract. In such cases, opening the
window fully may be a smarter move. And of course water or damp around
electrical accessories is a potential cause of fire.


NT

Tim S

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Apr 3, 2009, 7:52:24 AM4/3/09
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meow...@care2.com coughed up some electrons that declared:

> Tim S wrote:
>> Good point - especially if doing this in an office and you set the whole
>> fire alarm system off.
>>
>> You can get proper orange/red caps for the commercial detectors which I
>> think is preferred as it's obvious to everyone that it's still on.
>>
>> I'll add this with a side note about not capping off commercial detectors
>> without consulting the local fire officer and not leaving any capping on
>> when not required, in any location.
>>
>> Cheers
>>
>> Tim
>
> If you're a tenant, beware of doing this. Disabling fire detection
> equipment can have major financial consequences if a fire occurs, you
> could be held liable, check your contract. In such cases, opening the
> window fully may be a smarter move. And of course water or damp around
> electrical accessories is a potential cause of fire.
>
>
> NT

Perhaps reduce the whole thing to a warning about "steam might set off smoke
detectors" and "if you are thinking of capping them off, please be sure to
check you have any required authorisation, especially in a shared or
commercial building.". Don't want to make a big deal of it, because it's
supposed to be a Stripping Wiki, not a Disabling-Fire-Detection-Practises
wiki :)

Cheers

Tim

John Rumm

unread,
Apr 3, 2009, 12:06:47 PM4/3/09
to
Tim S wrote:

>>
>> As long as you have the one vital tool - a proper *sharp* scraper:
>>
>>
> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/16530/Decorating-Sundries/Decorators-Knives/Heavy-Duty-Scraper
>
> That's what I used for glue removal.
>
>> then even painted wood chip comes off easily enough. Either scrape off
>> in one hit, or more likely, scrape once which scars the surface (the
>> wood chips make it easy for the scraper to slice lumps off). The wet and
>> wait, finally the rest comes off much like ordinary paper.
>>
>
> Can I incorporate that, John?

of course...

meow...@care2.com

unread,
Apr 3, 2009, 1:40:15 PM4/3/09
to

and rented accomodation, the financial results to the renter can be
disastrous. Its not a trivial issue, contracts can state that the
tenant becomes liable for losses if the fire protection system is
disabled, and if insurance doesnt pay out, which it doesnt in all
cases, the tenant can lose everything but the shirt on their back.


NT

Tim S

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Apr 4, 2009, 9:57:57 AM4/4/09
to
Hi all,

Rather than go through another round of posting, I thought it easier to slam
it up in a draft state:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Stripping_Wallpaper

Thanks to everyone - I think I've incorporated and/or quoted every
suggestion here - please squeak if I forgot one or I misquoted you.

I was tempted to refer to various larger quotes as "Andrew's
method", "Mark's method", "John's method" etc, but it seemed unfair on
other contributors, so I didn't in the end. I settled for marking such bits
as "Mostly verbatim from original author" (allowing typo edits and
formatting) and "Adapted from original author" for reworks, but there's a
link to this thread via google if any future readers want to see the
source.

Are you all happy with that way? I don't do a lot of Wiki edits where it's a
merger of many ideas (ie I more often author stuff that is entirely down to
me), so I'm not up on the etiquette.

Cheers

Tim

ARWadsworth

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Apr 5, 2009, 6:22:23 AM4/5/09
to

"Tim S" <t...@dionic.net> wrote in message
news:49d55706$0$513$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk...

You forgot a section about what you are allowed to say when you see what
colour your parents had previously painted the walls before they covered
them in wallpaper:-)

Adam


Tim S

unread,
Apr 10, 2009, 6:59:31 AM4/10/09
to

meow...@care2.com

unread,
Apr 10, 2009, 7:34:26 AM4/10/09
to

nice one


NT

Dave Liquorice

unread,
Apr 10, 2009, 7:24:19 AM4/10/09
to
On Fri, 10 Apr 2009 11:59:31 +0100, Tim S wrote:

> http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Stripping_Wallpaper

Still disagree that a steamer "Can make a wet mess". In my experience the
peelings are more or less dry within half an hour of being removed. You'd
only just be starting the job with the soaked through and soggy
spray/sponge method which leaves you with a pile of soaked paper to deal
with. A steamer is also much quicker than soaking, even taking into
account the time required for the steamer to get up to temperature.

--
Cheers
Dave.

Tim S

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Apr 10, 2009, 8:25:58 AM4/10/09
to
Dave Liquorice coughed up some electrons that declared:

What would you suggest?

Originally, I read it as you did and thought "it doesn't really, IMHE").

But later discussions did lead to the intent perhaps being to note that it
does produce some liquid water and gunk, particularly in relation to
damageable surfaces and nearby electrikery.

Open to offerings (or you could just tweak it yourself - it *is* a Wiki
afterall :)

Cheers

Tim

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