Circular saw annoyance

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Bob

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Sep 13, 2009, 5:23:43 PM9/13/09
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Just thought I'd share my experience with tackling a job I asked about
earlier this year (and which I've only just got around to!):

http://groups.google.co.uk/group/uk.d-i-y/browse_frm/thread/36c42c23d4c4946c/f6b152ee04f8447b?q=group:uk.d-i-y+insubject:kitchen+insubject:cupboard#f6b152ee04f8447b

It was suggested in this thread that I make a sawboard to get straight
accurate cuts with my circular saw. I thought that was a good idea so
it was my first task. Unfortunately it turned out to be completely
useless because the bottom of the motor housing on my saw is only
slightly above the level of the baseplate and doesn't clear the guide
part of the sawboard. I experimented with a version of the sawboard
for the bit of the baseplate on the other side of the blade but that
is very narrow and doesn't provide the stability needed. Very
frustrating...

In the thread I reference above, I said I'd never really been happy
with the saw (a B&D thing), and rarely used it as a result. I was
dissuaded from considering a new one but I think the idea might be
back on the table now ;-) Anyone care to suggest something decent but
not prohibitively expensive?

Thanks,

Bob

Matty F

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Sep 13, 2009, 5:48:44 PM9/13/09
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On Sep 14, 9:23 am, Bob <bob.smith...@googlemail.com> wrote:
> Just thought I'd share my experience with tackling a job I asked about
> earlier this year (and which I've only just got around to!):
>
> http://groups.google.co.uk/group/uk.d-i-y/browse_frm/thread/36c42c23d...

>
> It was suggested in this thread that I make a sawboard to get straight
> accurate cuts with my circular saw. I thought that was a good idea so
> it was my first task. Unfortunately it turned out to be completely
> useless because the bottom of the motor housing on my saw is only
> slightly above the level of the baseplate and doesn't clear the guide
> part of the sawboard. I experimented with a version of the sawboard
> for the bit of the baseplate on the other side of the blade but that
> is very narrow and doesn't provide the stability needed. Very
> frustrating...

I have not made a sawboard. I just get a piece of plywood about 7mm
thick, about 300 mm wide, and longer than the cut I want to make.
The saw slides well against that, and there is plenty of room to clamp
the plywood at both ends without the clamps getting in the way.

John Rumm

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Sep 13, 2009, 6:15:58 PM9/13/09
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Bob wrote:
> Just thought I'd share my experience with tackling a job I asked about
> earlier this year (and which I've only just got around to!):
>
> http://groups.google.co.uk/group/uk.d-i-y/browse_frm/thread/36c42c23d4c4946c/f6b152ee04f8447b?q=group:uk.d-i-y+insubject:kitchen+insubject:cupboard#f6b152ee04f8447b
>
> It was suggested in this thread that I make a sawboard to get straight
> accurate cuts with my circular saw. I thought that was a good idea so
> it was my first task. Unfortunately it turned out to be completely
> useless because the bottom of the motor housing on my saw is only
> slightly above the level of the baseplate and doesn't clear the guide
> part of the sawboard. I experimented with a version of the sawboard
> for the bit of the baseplate on the other side of the blade but that
> is very narrow and doesn't provide the stability needed. Very
> frustrating...

Most circular saws have an adjustment that allows the depth of cut to be
reduced - typically knob at the rear of the machine is slackened off and
the sole place pulled down a bit (it hinges at the front). The motor
usually moves up with the saw making a bit more clearance at the expense
of a slight reduction in depth of cut.

> In the thread I reference above, I said I'd never really been happy
> with the saw (a B&D thing), and rarely used it as a result. I was
> dissuaded from considering a new one but I think the idea might be
> back on the table now ;-) Anyone care to suggest something decent but
> not prohibitively expensive?

Hitachi C7U or the equivalent Makita.

--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\=================================================================/

Andrew Gabriel

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Sep 13, 2009, 6:16:08 PM9/13/09
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In article <f9255327-9c3c-4b92...@g23g2000yqh.googlegroups.com>,

Bob <bob.sm...@googlemail.com> writes:
> In the thread I reference above, I said I'd never really been happy
> with the saw (a B&D thing), and rarely used it as a result. I was
> dissuaded from considering a new one but I think the idea might be
> back on the table now ;-) Anyone care to suggest something decent but
> not prohibitively expensive?

I've been very happy with a Kress one I've had for about 8 years.
It got heavy use for first few years whilst I was doing lots of
work of that nature (couple of kitchens, cutting up floor boards for
rewiring and installing central heating, new facias, new banisters
and balustrades, etc), but not used much recently. Wickes started
selling it rebadged as their own too, but I bought mine before they
did that. Don't know if they still do the rebadged Kress nowadays.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]

Dave Plowman (News)

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Sep 13, 2009, 6:34:51 PM9/13/09
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In article
<f9255327-9c3c-4b92...@g23g2000yqh.googlegroups.com>,

Bob <bob.sm...@googlemail.com> wrote:
> It was suggested in this thread that I make a sawboard to get straight
> accurate cuts with my circular saw. I thought that was a good idea so
> it was my first task. Unfortunately it turned out to be completely
> useless because the bottom of the motor housing on my saw is only
> slightly above the level of the baseplate and doesn't clear the guide
> part of the sawboard. I experimented with a version of the sawboard
> for the bit of the baseplate on the other side of the blade but that
> is very narrow and doesn't provide the stability needed. Very
> frustrating...

I use a long spirit level for most things.

--
*I used to have an open mind but my brains kept falling out *

Dave Plowman da...@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.

The Medway Handyman

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Sep 13, 2009, 7:31:37 PM9/13/09
to
John Rumm wrote:
> Bob wrote:
>> Just thought I'd share my experience with tackling a job I asked
>> about earlier this year (and which I've only just got around to!):
>>
>> http://groups.google.co.uk/group/uk.d-i-y/browse_frm/thread/36c42c23d4c4946c/f6b152ee04f8447b?q=group:uk.d-i-y+insubject:kitchen+insubject:cupboard#f6b152ee04f8447b
>>
>> It was suggested in this thread that I make a sawboard to get
>> straight accurate cuts with my circular saw. I thought that was a
>> good idea so it was my first task. Unfortunately it turned out to
>> be completely useless because the bottom of the motor housing on my
>> saw is only slightly above the level of the baseplate and doesn't
>> clear the guide part of the sawboard. I experimented with a version
>> of the sawboard for the bit of the baseplate on the other side of
>> the blade but that is very narrow and doesn't provide the stability
>> needed. Very frustrating...
>
> Most circular saws have an adjustment that allows the depth of cut to
> be reduced - typically knob at the rear of the machine is slackened
> off and the sole place pulled down a bit (it hinges at the front).
> The motor usually moves up with the saw making a bit more clearance
> at the expense of a slight reduction in depth of cut.

Absolutely, you lose a little depth of cut, but gain 100% accuracy.


>
>> In the thread I reference above, I said I'd never really been happy
>> with the saw (a B&D thing), and rarely used it as a result. I was
>> dissuaded from considering a new one but I think the idea might be
>> back on the table now ;-) Anyone care to suggest something decent but
>> not prohibitively expensive?
>
> Hitachi C7U or the equivalent Makita.

I have to say I'm a little dissapointed with my Makita 5604. Pressed steel
base. Often cuts off square unless you adjust it every time its used, also
has stupid plastic wheels on the blade guard which fall off every time its
used.

Not what I expect from Mak, wouldn't buy another.


--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk


John Rumm

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Sep 13, 2009, 8:24:06 PM9/13/09
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They have a couple of different models IIRC. One has a cast sole plate
like the Hitachi (then again, that may not be in the current model range
- I have not looked for a while)

> Not what I expect from Mak, wouldn't buy another.

Alas like all brands they are not lemon free, you still need to chose
with care.

dennis@home

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Sep 14, 2009, 3:08:03 AM9/14/09
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"Dave Plowman (News)" <da...@davenoise.co.uk> wrote in message
news:509a5a8...@davenoise.co.uk...


> In article
> <f9255327-9c3c-4b92...@g23g2000yqh.googlegroups.com>,
> Bob <bob.sm...@googlemail.com> wrote:
>> It was suggested in this thread that I make a sawboard to get straight
>> accurate cuts with my circular saw. I thought that was a good idea so
>> it was my first task. Unfortunately it turned out to be completely
>> useless because the bottom of the motor housing on my saw is only
>> slightly above the level of the baseplate and doesn't clear the guide
>> part of the sawboard. I experimented with a version of the sawboard
>> for the bit of the baseplate on the other side of the blade but that
>> is very narrow and doesn't provide the stability needed. Very
>> frustrating...
>
> I use a long spirit level for most things.

I bought a guide clamp (to use as a clamp initially) and that works well for
the saw and the router.

It sounds like the OP hasn't found the depth adjuster on his saw, he is
probably ripping the surface up if he hasn't, they tend to do that if they
are set to deep.

1501

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Sep 14, 2009, 3:19:53 AM9/14/09
to
On 14 Sep, 08:08, "dennis@home" <den...@killspam.kicks-ass.net> wrote:
> "Dave Plowman (News)" <d...@davenoise.co.uk> wrote in messagenews:509a5a8...@davenoise.co.uk...
>
> > In article
> > <f9255327-9c3c-4b92-b9cc-cab49118f...@g23g2000yqh.googlegroups.com>,

> >   Bob <bob.smith...@googlemail.com> wrote:
> >> It was suggested in this thread that I make a sawboard to get straight
> >> accurate cuts with my circular saw.  I thought that was a good idea so
> >> it was my first task.  Unfortunately it turned out to be completely
> >> useless because the bottom of the motor housing on my saw is only
> >> slightly above the level of the baseplate and doesn't clear the guide
> >> part of the sawboard. I experimented with a version of the sawboard
> >> for the bit of the baseplate on the other side of the blade but that
> >> is very narrow and doesn't provide the stability needed. Very
> >> frustrating...
>
> > I use a long spirit level for most things.
>
> I bought a guide clamp (to use as a clamp initially) and that works well for
> the saw and the router.
>
> It sounds like the OP hasn't found the depth adjuster on his saw, he is
> probably ripping the surface up if he hasn't, they tend to do that if they
> are set to deep.

Another couple of ways to reduce breakout of the melamine is to

a: lay a strip of self adhesive tape along the cut line.

or better

b: overlay the MFC with a sacrificial piece of hardboard or MDF and
keep the saw pressed down well against it.

Way out of the DIYer's league the flat-pack cabinet manufacturers have
clever panel saws with an extra contra-rotating blade which nicks the
melamine surface first.

Andrew Gabriel

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Sep 14, 2009, 4:50:48 AM9/14/09
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In article <8718c117-560b-41f3...@g19g2000yqo.googlegroups.com>,

Cut in from the front edge with the board upside down.
Use a new (sharp) blade, and not a course one.
Set depth so blade penetrates no more than half inch
deeper than the board thickness.
Cut with the cutter sole pressed against a straight edge
guide temporarily fixed to the worktop underside (how
the thread started).
Support both sides so the final part doesn't snap off.

If you do all this, no additional finishing off will be
required.

Ian White

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Sep 14, 2009, 4:49:26 AM9/14/09
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The Medway Handyman wrote:
>> Most circular saws have an adjustment that allows the depth of cut to
>> be reduced - typically knob at the rear of the machine is slackened
>> off and the sole place pulled down a bit (it hinges at the front).
>> The motor usually moves up with the saw making a bit more clearance
>> at the expense of a slight reduction in depth of cut.
>
>Absolutely, you lose a little depth of cut, but gain 100% accuracy.

Agreed.

It sounds like the OP's guide rail on the sawboard is thicker than it
needs to be. Even in the lowest blade position, there must still be
*some* clearance between the running edge of the baseplate and the
bottom of the motor housing, even if it's only a millimetre or two.

This would be an excellent excu\\\\ reason to buy a power planer :-)


--
Ian White

Dave Plowman (News)

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Sep 14, 2009, 5:06:52 AM9/14/09
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In article
<8718c117-560b-41f3...@g19g2000yqo.googlegroups.com>,

1501 <brian....@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
> Another couple of ways to reduce breakout of the melamine is to

> a: lay a strip of self adhesive tape along the cut line.

> or better

> b: overlay the MFC with a sacrificial piece of hardboard or MDF and
> keep the saw pressed down well against it.

> Way out of the DIYer's league the flat-pack cabinet manufacturers have
> clever panel saws with an extra contra-rotating blade which nicks the
> melamine surface first.

I get a pretty good cut without any of that - just using a quality sharp
tipped blade set to just over the thickness of the board.

--
*Why do we say something is out of whack? What is a whack? *

dennis@home

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Sep 14, 2009, 5:12:53 AM9/14/09
to

"1501" <brian....@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:8718c117-560b-41f3...@g19g2000yqo.googlegroups.com...


> Way out of the DIYer's league the flat-pack cabinet manufacturers have
> clever panel saws with an extra contra-rotating blade which nicks the
> melamine surface first.

The DIY alternative is a Stanley knife.
Its easy to run the knife down a sawboard before the saw.

Bob

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Sep 14, 2009, 12:54:30 PM9/14/09
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On 13 Sep, 23:15, John Rumm <see.my.signat...@nowhere.null> wrote:

>
> Mostcircularsaws have an adjustment that allows the depth of cut to be


> reduced - typically knob at the rear of the machine is slackened off and
> the sole place pulled down a bit (it hinges at the front). The motor

> usually moves up with thesawmaking a bit more clearance at the expense


> of a slight reduction in depth of cut.
>

Of course they do. Doh! Ever felt like a wally? I did say I hadn't
used it much so the only mitigation I can offer is that it hasn't been
out of the box for a few years plus I was doing it in something of a
hurry as I only had a couple of hours while the house was kid-free. I
was already hassled as I discovered the shelves I needed to cut
weren't as square as I expected them to be, despite fitting between
two existing wall cupboards. It was a bad day generally - I should
have just read the paper.

In spite of all this I am sold on the idea of the sawboard. Others
have commented that they just clamp a spirit level or a piece of
wood. The advantages I see are:

(i) you can make it wide enough (i.e. size in direction at right
angles to cut) so that the clamps are out of the way

(ii) you only need to make one measurement - and that's where you want
the cut. With other methods you need to make that measurement and
then account for the blade offset. That's fiddlier and introduces more
scope for errors to creep in and mistakes to be made.

~~
Bob

The Medway Handyman

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Sep 14, 2009, 1:57:08 PM9/14/09
to
Bob wrote:
> On 13 Sep, 23:15, John Rumm <see.my.signat...@nowhere.null> wrote:
>
>>
>> Mostcircularsaws have an adjustment that allows the depth of cut to
>> be reduced - typically knob at the rear of the machine is slackened
>> off and the sole place pulled down a bit (it hinges at the front).
>> The motor usually moves up with thesawmaking a bit more clearance at
>> the expense of a slight reduction in depth of cut.
>>
>
> Of course they do. Doh! Ever felt like a wally? I did say I hadn't
> used it much so the only mitigation I can offer is that it hasn't been
> out of the box for a few years plus I was doing it in something of a
> hurry as I only had a couple of hours while the house was kid-free. I
> was already hassled as I discovered the shelves I needed to cut
> weren't as square as I expected them to be, despite fitting between
> two existing wall cupboards. It was a bad day generally - I should
> have just read the paper.

What I cal a grey moment...


>
> In spite of all this I am sold on the idea of the sawboard. Others
> have commented that they just clamp a spirit level or a piece of
> wood. The advantages I see are:
>
> (i) you can make it wide enough (i.e. size in direction at right
> angles to cut) so that the clamps are out of the way
>
> (ii) you only need to make one measurement - and that's where you want
> the cut. With other methods you need to make that measurement and
> then account for the blade offset. That's fiddlier and introduces more
> scope for errors to creep in and mistakes to be made.

Both true Bob, but another advantage is that the largest area of the saw
base is supported by the sawboard. With a clamp on straight edge you have
to run the 'non motor' side of the saw along the edge which gives less
support IYSWIM.

Stuart Noble

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Sep 14, 2009, 2:29:02 PM9/14/09
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Easy to clamp a straightedge to the motor side with a pair of small g
cramps tightened from below, or have the guide wide enough to miss the
clamps altogether. Despite having an assortment of T square jigs, I
often find myself using a length of 2" x 1" or whatever, together with
my measuring jig (a piece of ply the width of the baseplate/cut
distance). That way I still only measure once and it's useful for
tapered cuts.

dennis@home

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Sep 14, 2009, 3:12:38 PM9/14/09
to

"Stuart Noble" <stuart...@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:OXvrm.79166$OO7....@text.news.virginmedia.com...
> The Medway Handyman wrote:

8<

>> Both true Bob, but another advantage is that the largest area of the saw
>> base is supported by the sawboard. With a clamp on straight edge you
>> have to run the 'non motor' side of the saw along the edge which gives
>> less support IYSWIM.
>>
>>
> Easy to clamp a straightedge to the motor side with a pair of small g
> cramps tightened from below, or have the guide wide enough to miss the
> clamps altogether.

I think he calls it a grey moment. ;-)

John Rumm

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Sep 14, 2009, 3:13:16 PM9/14/09
to

Other benefits include protecting the work from scratching via the sole
plate, and reducing breakout at the surface:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Sawboard

The Medway Handyman

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Sep 14, 2009, 6:22:51 PM9/14/09
to

You clearly have no idea what a sawboard is or how to use one you halfwit.

The Medway Handyman

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Sep 14, 2009, 6:42:36 PM9/14/09
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Yerbut, a piece of 2 x 1 on the motor side means you lose 25mm of your
cutting depth because the motor has to go over it. A 190mm saw now has a
cutting depth of 41mm instead of 66mm.

A sawboard made from 3mm ply with a 3mm batten means you lose 3mm of the
cutting depth because the saw sits on the ply, but most saws have 3mm
clearance under the motor, so no loss there. My Makita 165mm saw will
easily cut a 38mm worktop, only losing 3mm of its 54mm depth.

A sawboard is only a straightedge and a measuring jig in one piece, but the
offset is cut by the saw itself & not measured. I have no idea what the
baseplate/cut distance of either of my circular saws is - I don't need to
know.

All you need to do is mark your cut line & clamp the sawboard to it. I make
mine double edged, e.g. batten in the centre of an over width piece of ply &
cut both sides - plenty of room for clamps.

I frequently use a sawboard for tapered cuts.

Stuart Noble

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Sep 15, 2009, 4:18:58 AM9/15/09
to

But to trim a door lengthways?

dennis@home

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Sep 15, 2009, 4:56:36 AM9/15/09
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"Stuart Noble" <stuart...@ntlworld.com> wrote in message

news:S5Irm.79324$OO7....@text.news.virginmedia.com...

> But to trim a door lengthways?

Done that, I have a saw board made from a piece of 8' x 1' ply just ripped
from a sheet.
Its actually for cutting ox sheets but it will do a door too.

I also have one of these
http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pf_id=21610&name=guide+clamp&user_search=1&sfile=1&jump=0

Its somewhat easier to carry about and you can use it with the wide part of
the sole plate on the work without worrying about using low profile clamps
on a batten to get around TMH supposed problem. You would think that a
"professional" handyman would have worked out how to use a guide batten by
now but apparently he hasn't.

Dave Plowman (News)

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Sep 15, 2009, 5:38:31 AM9/15/09
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In article <S5Irm.79324$OO7....@text.news.virginmedia.com>,

Stuart Noble <stuart...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
> But to trim a door lengthways?

I have some ContiBoard shelving (9" wide) kept for this purpose

--
*The e-mail of the species is more deadly than the mail *

Stuart Noble

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Sep 15, 2009, 8:32:17 AM9/15/09
to
Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
> In article <S5Irm.79324$OO7....@text.news.virginmedia.com>,
> Stuart Noble <stuart...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
>> But to trim a door lengthways?
>
> I have some ContiBoard shelving (9" wide) kept for this purpose
>

Reliably straight IME.

The Medway Handyman

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Sep 15, 2009, 12:48:04 PM9/15/09
to
dennis@home wrote:
> "Stuart Noble" <stuart...@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
> news:S5Irm.79324$OO7....@text.news.virginmedia.com...
>
>> But to trim a door lengthways?
>
> Done that, I have a saw board made from a piece of 8' x 1' ply just
> ripped from a sheet.
> Its actually for cutting ox sheets but it will do a door too.
>
> I also have one of these
> http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pf_id=21610&name=guide+clamp&user_search=1&sfile=1&jump=0
>
> Its somewhat easier to carry about and you can use it with the wide
> part of the sole plate on the work without worrying about using low
> profile clamps on a batten to get around TMH supposed problem.

I don't have a problem with clamps halfwit, I make the sawboard wide enough.

If you are trimming off an amount smaller that the blade/edge offset on the
motor side, the saw isn't supported properly. If you use a sawboard it is.
The real strength of a sawboard is that you don't have to measure any
offset - but you wouldn't be bright enough to realise that.

>You
> would think that a "professional" handyman would have worked out how
> to use a guide batten by now but apparently he hasn't.

You would think a "professional" twat would have learned to read posts
properly by now, but you haven't.

The Medway Handyman

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Sep 15, 2009, 12:52:48 PM9/15/09
to

Never done it cos I don't really hang doors, just trim them. Easy enough to
make a door sized sawboard.

I have many times used a 4' sawboard to taper cut a 10' deck board. After
the first cut, you reposition the sawboard & align its edge with the cut
edge of the board, then carry on. You can't see where the old/new cut
changed.

I'va also used a 4' sawboard to trim the edge of a 35' deck using the method
above.

Matty F

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Sep 15, 2009, 8:54:24 PM9/15/09
to
On Sep 15, 7:13 am, John Rumm <see.my.signat...@nowhere.null> wrote:
> Bob wrote:
> > On 13 Sep, 23:15, John Rumm <see.my.signat...@nowhere.null> wrote:

> > In spite of all this I am sold on the idea of the sawboard. Others
> > have commented that they just clamp a spirit level or a piece of
> > wood. The advantages I see are:
>
> > (i) you can make it wide enough (i.e. size in direction at right
> > angles to cut) so that the clamps are out of the way

My "piece of wood" is several feet wide. The clamps are out of the
way.

> > (ii) you only need to make one measurement - and that's where you want
> > the cut. With other methods you need to make that measurement and
> > then account for the blade offset. That's fiddlier and introduces more
> > scope for errors to creep in and mistakes to be made.

I can't see why a measurement is so fiddly.

> Other benefits include protecting the work from scratching via the sole
> plate, and reducing breakout at the surface:
>
> http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Sawboard

"protecting the work from scratching" is the best reason I can see for
using a sawboard. I can't use one when I am cutting down the edges of
a 60mm door, as I'm doing a lot of these days. I'm putting sheet steel
on all exterior doors to stop people smashing them down, as they do
sometimes.

Is there a conspiracy to explain the use of sawboards in the most
difficult way possible? I have looked at half a dozen explanations.
Why is there a left-handed saw in the reference above? I have never
seen a left-handed Skilsaw.

John Rumm

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Sep 15, 2009, 9:44:23 PM9/15/09
to
Matty F wrote:

> I can't see why a measurement is so fiddly.

Its not - just that the board allows you to position the exact edge of
the kerf where you want it, enhancing the accuracy of your measurement.
If you draw a line and follow it, you can be a small distance out. If
you run along a conventional straight edge you need to account for the
offset from the sole plate to the blade with each layout and cut.

>> Other benefits include protecting the work from scratching via the sole
>> plate, and reducing breakout at the surface:
>>
>> http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Sawboard
>
> "protecting the work from scratching" is the best reason I can see for
> using a sawboard. I can't use one when I am cutting down the edges of
> a 60mm door, as I'm doing a lot of these days. I'm putting sheet steel
> on all exterior doors to stop people smashing them down, as they do
> sometimes.
>
> Is there a conspiracy to explain the use of sawboards in the most
> difficult way possible? I have looked at half a dozen explanations.

How would you suggest simplifying the explanation?

> Why is there a left-handed saw in the reference above? I have never
> seen a left-handed Skilsaw.

This is an equal opportunity wiki, we don't discriminate against
southpaws... ;-)

(well in fact, that was the first decent looking circular saw that came
out of the sketchup object library)

Matty F

unread,
Sep 15, 2009, 10:45:32 PM9/15/09
to
On Sep 16, 1:44 pm, John Rumm <see.my.signat...@nowhere.null> wrote:
> Matty F wrote:

> > Is there a conspiracy to explain the use of sawboards in the most
> > difficult way possible? I have looked at half a dozen explanations.
>
> How would you suggest simplifying the explanation?

Perhaps you have not seen what Google gives me!
This one seems incredibly complicated (look at the end photos):
http://www.woodworkforums.com/showthread.php?t=55016

Another site shows the saw in place on the sawboard but they have not
cut the edge off the board yet. Another shows the saw being used
around the wrong way so that it is not supported properly and would
not cut square.

> > Why is there a left-handed saw in the reference above? I have never
> > seen a left-handed Skilsaw.
>
> This is an equal opportunity wiki, we don't discriminate against
> southpaws... ;-)
>
> (well in fact, that was the first decent looking circular saw that came
> out of the sketchup object library)

I hope you are going to change it. A real photo would do!

John Rumm

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Sep 16, 2009, 1:39:55 AM9/16/09
to
Matty F wrote:
> On Sep 16, 1:44 pm, John Rumm <see.my.signat...@nowhere.null> wrote:
>> Matty F wrote:
>
>>> Is there a conspiracy to explain the use of sawboards in the most
>>> difficult way possible? I have looked at half a dozen explanations.
>> How would you suggest simplifying the explanation?
>
> Perhaps you have not seen what Google gives me!
> This one seems incredibly complicated (look at the end photos):
> http://www.woodworkforums.com/showthread.php?t=55016

LOL - yup I see your point, they do seem to have over egged that one a tad.

> Another site shows the saw in place on the sawboard but they have not
> cut the edge off the board yet. Another shows the saw being used
> around the wrong way so that it is not supported properly and would
> not cut square.
>
>>> Why is there a left-handed saw in the reference above? I have never
>>> seen a left-handed Skilsaw.
>> This is an equal opportunity wiki, we don't discriminate against
>> southpaws... ;-)
>>
>> (well in fact, that was the first decent looking circular saw that came
>> out of the sketchup object library)
>
> I hope you are going to change it. A real photo would do!

Ha, beat you to it (by 20 mins or so!)

Reload:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Sawboard

Should get a more traditional looking saw this time (if not, hit F5)

Matty F

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Sep 16, 2009, 1:55:35 AM9/16/09
to
On Sep 16, 5:39 pm, John Rumm <see.my.signat...@nowhere.null> wrote:
> Matty F wrote:

> >>> Why is there a left-handed saw in the reference above? I have never
> >>> seen a left-handed Skilsaw.
> >> This is an equal opportunity wiki, we don't discriminate against
> >> southpaws... ;-)
>
> >> (well in fact, that was the first decent looking circular saw that came
> >> out of the sketchup object library)
>
> > I hope you are going to change it. A real photo would do!
>
> Ha, beat you to it (by 20 mins or so!)
>
> Reload:
>
> http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Sawboard
>
> Should get a more traditional looking saw this time (if not, hit F5)

Much better thanks. How long do battery powered saws cut for
anyway? :)

dennis@home

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Sep 16, 2009, 4:23:28 AM9/16/09
to

"John Rumm" <see.my.s...@nowhere.null> wrote in message
news:ApqdnUFHeaVn3y3X...@brightview.co.uk...

>> Is there a conspiracy to explain the use of sawboards in the most
>> difficult way possible? I have looked at half a dozen explanations.
>
> How would you suggest simplifying the explanation?

How about a video on youtube?

>
>> Why is there a left-handed saw in the reference above? I have never
>> seen a left-handed Skilsaw.
>
> This is an equal opportunity wiki, we don't discriminate against
> southpaws... ;-)
>
> (well in fact, that was the first decent looking circular saw that came
> out of the sketchup object library)

I have two saws, one has the sole plate on the other side.
It doesn't make any difference other than which hand I hold it on as one has
to start at the left hand end and the other the right hand end.

dennis@home

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Sep 16, 2009, 4:30:58 AM9/16/09
to

"John Rumm" <see.my.s...@nowhere.null> wrote in message

news:HZmdnTDk2uCz5y3X...@brightview.co.uk...

> Ha, beat you to it (by 20 mins or so!)
>
> Reload:
>
> http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Sawboard
>
> Should get a more traditional looking saw this time (if not, hit F5)

Maybe you should make your sawboard double sided like mine?
One side does 90 degree cuts, the other 45 degree cuts.
Its a bit wider so its easier to clamp.

John Rumm

unread,
Sep 16, 2009, 6:18:16 PM9/16/09
to

or circular saw one side, jigsaw the other etc.

John Rumm

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Sep 16, 2009, 6:18:27 PM9/16/09
to

My little dewalt one will do about 8 - 10 mins I suppose. ;-)

The Medway Handyman

unread,
Sep 16, 2009, 7:17:33 PM9/16/09
to
John Rumm wrote:
> dennis@home wrote:
>>
>>
>> "John Rumm" <see.my.s...@nowhere.null> wrote in message
>> news:HZmdnTDk2uCz5y3X...@brightview.co.uk...
>>
>>> Ha, beat you to it (by 20 mins or so!)
>>>
>>> Reload:
>>>
>>> http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Sawboard
>>>
>>> Should get a more traditional looking saw this time (if not, hit F5)
>>
>> Maybe you should make your sawboard double sided like mine?
>> One side does 90 degree cuts, the other 45 degree cuts.
>> Its a bit wider so its easier to clamp.

How often do you need to make 45 degree cuts halfwit?


>
> or circular saw one side, jigsaw the other etc.

I make mine circ/circ both sides, no confusion, muchas roomo for clamps.

Shouldn't be using a jigsaw for straight cuts - naughty Mr Rumm!

John Rumm

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Sep 16, 2009, 7:57:02 PM9/16/09
to
The Medway Handyman wrote:

> John Rumm wrote:

>> or circular saw one side, jigsaw the other etc.
>
> I make mine circ/circ both sides, no confusion, muchas roomo for clamps.
>
> Shouldn't be using a jigsaw for straight cuts - naughty Mr Rumm!

Depends on what you are cutting! (you can get jigsaw blades for stuff
that you would not much fancy cutting with a circular saw).

(anyway, that nice jigsaw of yours will make a nice straight cut ;-)

Dave Plowman (News)

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Sep 17, 2009, 4:35:21 AM9/17/09
to
In article <ovWdnZ04wubM5izX...@brightview.co.uk>,

John Rumm <see.my.s...@nowhere.null> wrote:
> (anyway, that nice jigsaw of yours will make a nice straight cut ;-)

Perhaps on one side of the work. ;-)

--
*Can fat people go skinny-dipping?

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