A good reason for an all house RCD.

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The Natural Philosopher

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Sep 9, 2008, 6:43:22 AM9/9/08
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SWMBO put a beautiful vase of dahlias on the window sill in the office,
opened the windows wide, and left the room..

an hour later the house tripped..ah. The bowl of dahlias was lying in th
laser printer, now empty of water..and had dripped onto a server
keyboard as well. Curtains. wind and vases dont mix it seems.

Surprsingly enough the keyboard AND printer after a days draining and
drying stil work..but would the printer have survived with power on and
full of water?

I am happy that I did have a full house RCD.

John Rumm

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Sep 9, 2008, 7:06:42 AM9/9/08
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a UPS can render them a non factor with IT kit though...

--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
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| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\=================================================================/

Dave

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Sep 9, 2008, 12:31:53 PM9/9/08
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

A few years ago on another news group, a poster was advised to put his
keyboard under the shower for a few minutes and leave it somewhere warm
fo a week to dry out.
I dabble in computers for those that don't have a lot of money to spare
and I did this with a keyboard that had a full mug of milky, sweetened
coffee poured into it. After a week of drying it worked fine for several
years.

Another occasion where a bit of water resolved a problem was when my
wife came home from Scout camp with a waterlogged digital camera. She
had fallen into a stream and the camera was in the pocket on the side of
her jacket.
The batteries were new, but the camera always rejected them as flat. So
what I did was kill or cure. I dropped it into an ultrasonic bath filled
with water and a single drop of Fairy washing up liquid. After spend
quite some time in the bath with its lens extended and turned every way
which up, it now works fine and resides at the side of my computer ready
to use :-)

The Natural Philosopher

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Sep 9, 2008, 2:01:10 PM9/9/08
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Dave wrote:
> The Natural Philosopher wrote:
>
>> SWMBO put a beautiful vase of dahlias on the window sill in the
>> office, opened the windows wide, and left the room..
>>
>> an hour later the house tripped..ah. The bowl of dahlias was lying in
>> th laser printer, now empty of water..and had dripped onto a server
>> keyboard as well. Curtains. wind and vases dont mix it seems.
>>
>> Surprsingly enough the keyboard AND printer after a days draining and
>> drying stil work..but would the printer have survived with power on
>> and full of water?
>>
>> I am happy that I did have a full house RCD.
>
> A few years ago on another news group, a poster was advised to put his
> keyboard under the shower for a few minutes and leave it somewhere warm
> fo a week to dry out.
> I dabble in computers for those that don't have a lot of money to spare
> and I did this with a keyboard that had a full mug of milky, sweetened
> coffee poured into it. After a week of drying it worked fine for several
> years.
>

we've lost two macintosh keyboars to cat piss. No amount of washing
works - chip inputs blown.


The typical PC lkeyboard generally comes back though.


> Another occasion where a bit of water resolved a problem was when my
> wife came home from Scout camp with a waterlogged digital camera. She
> had fallen into a stream and the camera was in the pocket on the side of
> her jacket.
> The batteries were new, but the camera always rejected them as flat. So
> what I did was kill or cure. I dropped it into an ultrasonic bath filled
> with water and a single drop of Fairy washing up liquid. After spend
> quite some time in the bath with its lens extended and turned every way
> which up, it now works fine and resides at the side of my computer ready
> to use :-)

thast a good one!

We have te same issues with model seaplanes..people willland them wrong
way up in the sea and so on. The above generally works unless power
components have gone!


Dave Liquorice

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Sep 9, 2008, 1:49:47 PM9/9/08
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On Tue, 09 Sep 2008 17:31:53 +0100, Dave wrote:

> I dabble in computers for those that don't have a lot of money to spare
> and I did this with a keyboard that had a full mug of milky, sweetened
> coffee poured into it. After a week of drying it worked fine for several
> years.

Yep, it's not clean water that does the damage but things in the water
like sugar or salt. If something gets dunked it's best to remove any
batteries ASAP then if you can't get it under running clean water
reasonably quickly seal it up, wet, in a plastic bag so the gunk doesn't
dry on in tiny internal recesses. As soon as you can rinse it under cold
running cold water with as many bits taken off as possible, give it a good
shake in many directions and blot of any visible water. Then leave it
somewhere warm to dry naturally for a day or three before trying to use
it.

--
Cheers
Dave.

dennis@home

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Sep 9, 2008, 2:27:07 PM9/9/08
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"Dave Liquorice" <allsortsn...@howhill.com> wrote in message
news:nyyfbegfubjuvyypb...@srv1.howhill.net...

Good advice and obvious if you know most electronic equipment is cleaned
using water when its being made.
Leaving the power on is the biggest killer when electronics is wet.

I suggest you rinse it with de-ionised water after the tap water as tap
water may not be clean enough for some low power stuff.

Dave

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Sep 9, 2008, 6:05:38 PM9/9/08
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dennis@home wrote:


> Good advice and obvious if you know most electronic equipment is cleaned
> using water when its being made.
> Leaving the power on is the biggest killer when electronics is wet.
>
> I suggest you rinse it with de-ionised water after the tap water as tap
> water may not be clean enough for some low power stuff.

I have recently found out that de-ionised water is not as clean as we
think it is. I have an Epson printer and they are notorious for getting
blocked jets, so I went on the hunt for distilled water to push through
the jets from an old cartridge. Unfortunately, I couldn't find any. I
ended up at my local chemist and described what I wanted it for and said
that it must have no impurities and he said that he would order some in
for me. When I went to pick it up, he told me that he had come up with
something better. It is a pure water that is used to mix with powdered
injection drugs and is totally devoid of particles.

Dave

meow...@care2.com

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Sep 9, 2008, 6:39:31 PM9/9/08
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I thought 'water for injections' wasnt pure water, but pH balanced.


Water washing of mains equipment is standard practice in some industry
sectors. The main gotchas are:
- some components arent water compatible, primarily relays
- drying times should be several times as long as when things appear
to be totally dry, water trapped in microscopic crevices can't be seen
but takes much longer to dry.
- closed containers should be opened to enable drying

As small kids we were told water and electricity dont mix for good
reason, but that doesnt mean its accurate or even true. Electrode
heating is standard industrial practice. Its often seen in domestic
situations as well, though not regs compliant.


NT

dennis@home

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Sep 9, 2008, 6:42:42 PM9/9/08
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"Dave" <dave...@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
news:YJmdnb08-YypblvV...@bt.com...

It is just distilled water.
You can use that, but its hard to find these days.
Just make sure its not saline by mistake.
>
> Dave

geoff

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Sep 9, 2008, 6:46:38 PM9/9/08
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In message <YJmdnb08-YypblvV...@bt.com>, Dave
<dave...@btopenworld.com> writes
What, no Higgs bosons ?


--
geoff

Dave

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Sep 9, 2008, 7:21:49 PM9/9/08
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dennis@home wrote:

No, my stipulation was that there had to be no particles in it. Saline?
I can't see that being a problem, pushing it through epson jet nozzles.

Dave

Dave

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Sep 9, 2008, 7:25:34 PM9/9/08
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meow...@care2.com wrote:

> On Sep 9, 11:05 pm, Dave <daven...@btopenworld.com> wrote:
>
>>dennis@home wrote:
>>
>>>Good advice and obvious if you know most electronic equipment is cleaned
>>>using water when its being made.
>>>Leaving the power on is the biggest killer when electronics is wet.
>>
>>>I suggest you rinse it with de-ionised water after the tap water as tap
>>>water may not be clean enough for some low power stuff.
>>
>>I have recently found out that de-ionised water is not as clean as we
>>think it is. I have an Epson printer and they are notorious for getting
>>blocked jets, so I went on the hunt for distilled water to push through
>>the jets from an old cartridge. Unfortunately, I couldn't find any. I
>>ended up at my local chemist and described what I wanted it for and said
>>that it must have no impurities and he said that he would order some in
>>for me. When I went to pick it up, he told me that he had come up with
>>something better. It is a pure water that is used to mix with powdered
>>injection drugs and is totally devoid of particles.
>>
>>Dave
>
>
>
> I thought 'water for injections' wasnt pure water, but pH balanced.

I am not sure, but I will ask next time I pass our chemist, which might
be in the morning.

Dave

Dave Liquorice

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Sep 10, 2008, 3:34:40 AM9/10/08
to
On Wed, 10 Sep 2008 00:21:49 +0100, Dave wrote:

> No, my stipulation was that there had to be no particles in it. Saline?
> I can't see that being a problem, pushing it through epson jet nozzles.

Normal Saline is water plus sodium chloride (salt) 0.9% w/v. I wouldn't
like to say what what that such a solution could do to tiny parts.

Water for injection has very low particulate content and is either
produced by distillation or 2 stage reverse osmosis.

--
Cheers
Dave.

Derek

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Sep 10, 2008, 4:58:36 AM9/10/08
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On Tue, 09 Sep 2008 19:01:10 +0100, The Natural Philosopher <a@b.c>
wrote:

>we've lost two macintosh keyboars to cat piss. No amount of washing
>works - chip inputs blown.
>
>
>The typical PC lkeyboard generally comes back though.
>

Thus demonstrating very clearly the superiority of the PC over the
Mac. ;-)

>
>> Another occasion where a bit of water resolved a problem was when my
>> wife came home from Scout camp with a waterlogged digital camera. She
>> had fallen into a stream and the camera was in the pocket on the side of
>> her jacket.
>> The batteries were new, but the camera always rejected them as flat. So
>> what I did was kill or cure. I dropped it into an ultrasonic bath filled
>> with water and a single drop of Fairy washing up liquid. After spend
>> quite some time in the bath with its lens extended and turned every way
>> which up, it now works fine and resides at the side of my computer ready
>> to use :-)
>
>thast a good one!
>

My young daughter fell into a chemiculated swimming pool with her game
boy and that was the end of it. Despite immediate removal of batteries
and prolonged soaking in clean water.


>We have te same issues with model seaplanes..people willland them wrong
>way up in the sea and so on. The above generally works unless power
>components have gone!
>

Derek

Andrew Gabriel

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Sep 10, 2008, 10:59:01 AM9/10/08
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In article <122098338...@proxy01.news.clara.net>,

The Natural Philosopher <a@b.c> writes:
>
> The typical PC lkeyboard generally comes back though.

There's a guy who used to come to local computer fairs, selling
old office PC's. He washed all the keyboards and mice in his
dishwasher, and left them to dry for a couple of weeks. Very
rarely had a dud one when he then tested them. (Don't know if
he used dishwasher detergent.) I bought a nice Dell one off him
for a couple of quid once, and it's still working (although not
used much now).

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]

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