small angle grinder - or summat

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dave

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Jan 16, 2007, 8:29:35 PM1/16/07
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I think it might be useful to get a small angle-grinder for hacking
the occasional rusted bolt from the dark recesses of my car!

Any recommendation as to what and where from? Or maybe there's a
better tools for such things? Anything's got to be better than a
hacksaw blade in a rag!
Thanks

Andy Dingley <dingbat@codesmiths.com>

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Jan 16, 2007, 8:58:38 PM1/16/07
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dave wrote:
> I think it might be useful to get a small angle-grinder

Of course.

> Any recommendation as to what and where from?

Get a cheap one, kill it, finally get a Metabo.
Or buy a green Bosch, which will last for ages in light use.

Features you need are 4 1/2" disks and the standard thread size. Don't
go for 4" or 5".

You should have a spindle lock button and a well designed on/off
switch. Anything else is a question of build quality. Better ones also
have no-spanner nuts and anti-vibration handles.

You must also have good googles or faceshield, ear defenders and strong
gloves. Antivibration gloves are best, but thick leather will do.

You also need a big tin box to keep it in along with its stack of
whirly disks. Get _lots_ of whirly disks, they're the whole point of
the exercise. Choice here makes the tool more useful.

Screwfix do nice narrow chop blades. They have a good range of
everything.

Rigid disks (grind or cutoff, stone or metal) are traditional and
everyone should have some. For metal shaping a flap disk is a better
bet though. Leaves a much better finish and comes in a range of grits.
Norton's (via Screwfix) are OK, but the Hermes blue ones from CSM
Abrasives are even better and go to 120 grit fineness.

Whirly wire brushes are excellent rust strippers, but buy good quality
twisted ones and wear a thick apron. They throw bristles like crazy!

A diamond stone saw is handy and now cheap (Axminster!), but 9"
grinders have more reach. Could be an excuse to get a 5" for that extra
1/4" though.

3M make some nice metal polishing plastic abrasives.

Wood carving disks are scarey. Get an Arbortech (solid) not a Lancelot
(chainsaw), if you must.

> Or maybe there's a better tools for such things?

Plasma cutter, Multimaster. Nothing as cheap and universal though.

Dave Fawthrop

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Jan 16, 2007, 11:03:11 PM1/16/07
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Lidl then if it burns out get another. A little care and it will last
years.
--
Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk> Google Groups is IME the *worst*
method of accessing usenet. GG subscribers would be well advised get a
newsreader, say Agent, and a newsserver, say news.individual.net. These
will allow them: to see only *new* posts, a killfile, and other goodies.

Cicero

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Jan 17, 2007, 1:43:07 AM1/17/07
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===============================
Angle grinders are useful but a nut splitter can often be used where an
angle grinder can't go:

http://www.machinemart.co.uk/search.asp?q=nut+splitte

Cic.

--
================================
Testing UBUNTU Linux
Everything working so far
================================

Ian White

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Jan 17, 2007, 2:47:05 AM1/17/07
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Andy Dingley <din...@codesmiths.com> wrote:
>
>Whirly wire brushes are excellent rust strippers, but buy good quality
>twisted ones and wear a thick apron. They throw bristles like crazy!
>

Are there such things as whirly *plastic* scrubbing brushes for an angle
grinder?


--
Ian White

Frank Erskine

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Jan 17, 2007, 2:58:14 AM1/17/07
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On Wed, 17 Jan 2007 06:43:07 GMT, Cicero <shel...@hellfire.co.uk>
wrote:

>On Wed, 17 Jan 2007 01:29:35 +0000, dave wrote:
>
>> I think it might be useful to get a small angle-grinder for hacking the
>> occasional rusted bolt from the dark recesses of my car!
>>
>> Any recommendation as to what and where from? Or maybe there's a better
>> tools for such things? Anything's got to be better than a hacksaw blade in
>> a rag!
>> Thanks
>
>===============================
>Angle grinders are useful but a nut splitter can often be used where an
>angle grinder can't go:
>

A nut splitter's fine on a nut, but the OP was referring to bolts

:-)
--
Frank Erskine

The Medway Handyman

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Jan 17, 2007, 3:41:40 AM1/17/07
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I'd just recommend being bloody careful with it :-) Stitches come out
tomorrow :-)


--
Dave
The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
01634 717930
07850 597257


Julian

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Jan 17, 2007, 3:36:13 AM1/17/07
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"Dave Fawthrop" <inv...@hyphenologist.co.uk.invalid> wrote in message
news:ft7rq2t1tobv0e3ut...@4ax.com...

> On Wed, 17 Jan 2007 01:29:35 GMT, dave <da...@notetnot.anetwork> wrote:

>
> Lidl then if it burns out get another. A little care and it will last
> years.

I quite agree, I've got 4 cheapies - cutting, grinding, zirconium flap and
twisted wire brush. Since they are so cheap I can afford to be lazy and not
have to swap wheels about, this can become a PITA on larger jobs.

Mine have lasted a few years, and at a tenner a pop (a couple or three
beers) it matters little when they expire.

Julian.


Cicero

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Jan 17, 2007, 3:52:00 AM1/17/07
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===============================
True, but in practice it's more often necessary to remove damaged nuts
rather than bolts / bolt heads by destructive means. Additionally, a nut
splitter can be used to grip a bolt head sufficiently to loosen it prior
to removing with a spanner.

Tim Lamb

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Jan 17, 2007, 4:04:42 AM1/17/07
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In message <1168999118....@l53g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>, "Andy
Dingley <din...@codesmiths.com>" <din...@codesmiths.com> writes

>
>dave wrote:
>> I think it might be useful to get a small angle-grinder
>
>Features you need are 4 1/2" disks and the standard thread size. Don't
>go for 4" or 5".

Why don't you like 5"? Very handy for all those worn down 9" discs:-)

Won't help the OP I agree.

regards
--
Tim Lamb

Dave Plowman (News)

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Jan 17, 2007, 5:51:12 AM1/17/07
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In article <31vqq2lojn60fl137...@4ax.com>,

dave <da...@notetnot.anetwork> wrote:
> I think it might be useful to get a small angle-grinder for hacking
> the occasional rusted bolt from the dark recesses of my car!

Likely to do lots of damage to the surrounding metalwork. A set of nut
splitters is a better idea. Angle grinders ain't precision tools.

--
*Those who live by the sword get shot by those who don't*

Dave Plowman da...@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.

robgraham

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Jan 17, 2007, 6:12:31 AM1/17/07
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How logical - hadn't thought of that and changing disks is a pain I
agree.

I certainly back up the Screwfix, Lidl, etc route, and will be now
looking for a 2nd one. Darn that's something else to be found a
storage place in the workshop!

Rob

Dieseldes

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Jan 17, 2007, 6:45:17 AM1/17/07
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"Dave Plowman (News)" <da...@davenoise.co.uk> wrote in message
news:4ea6914...@davenoise.co.uk...

> In article <31vqq2lojn60fl137...@4ax.com>,
> dave <da...@notetnot.anetwork> wrote:
>> I think it might be useful to get a small angle-grinder for hacking
>> the occasional rusted bolt from the dark recesses of my car!
>
> Likely to do lots of damage to the surrounding metalwork. A set of nut
> splitters is a better idea. Angle grinders ain't precision tools.
>

Angle grinders can be very useful tools, but definitely not in the dark
recesses of a car, they are indiscriminate in what they slice through,
wiring, lighter steel than what your aiming for!! and many other things you
didn't realise ran past the Bolt head you were trying to remove!!

Des


mrcheerful .

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Jan 17, 2007, 6:57:45 AM1/17/07
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"Ian White" <I...@ifwtech.co.uk> wrote in message
news:4iUWCOG5...@ifwtech.co.uk...

Yes, there are.


Andy Dingley <dingbat@codesmiths.com>

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Jan 17, 2007, 8:14:22 AM1/17/07
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Tim Lamb wrote:

> Why don't you like 5"?

I don't mind 5", but 4" are definitely a bad idea. Most disks you use
will be 4 1/2" and they're just a bit clumsy in a 5" machine. In a 4"
they simply won't fit.

If all you're after is day-in-day-out grinding in a factory, then 5" is
great. For the flexibility of a DIY machine, I wouldn't recommend it.

Dave Plowman (News)

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Jan 17, 2007, 8:37:58 AM1/17/07
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In article <0nlrq2thi5j3bcpch...@4ax.com>,

> :-)

Even more of a problem to remove using an angle grinder, then, without
damage to the surrounding structure. ;-)

--
*Great groups from little icons grow *

Dave Plowman (News)

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Jan 17, 2007, 8:41:01 AM1/17/07
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In article <4iUWCOG5...@ifwtech.co.uk>,

Yes - Wickes, for one, do them. Sort of heavy duty pan scourer. Great for
removing paint and light rust.

I keep one cheap angle grinder permanently so equipped.

--
*I have plenty of talent and vision. I just don't care.

Andy Dingley <dingbat@codesmiths.com>

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Jan 17, 2007, 8:55:50 AM1/17/07
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Ian White wrote:

> Are there such things as whirly *plastic* scrubbing brushes for an angle
> grinder?

Not AFAIK, as the speed is too high. Drill-chuck mounted ones are
common and useful.

dave

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Jan 17, 2007, 8:57:48 AM1/17/07
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On Wed, 17 Jan 2007 11:45:17 -0000, "Dieseldes" <des...@orange.net>
wrote:

Thanks for the warning. I understand the risks. Actually I have used a
dremel type thing with a cutting disk, in the past. That worked but
took a while :-)
On one occasion a reciprocating saw with a fine steel-cutting blade.
That also worked. But as usual the problem is access.
btw This in not all on the same car!

Just wondered what new thing(s) was/were out there for this kind of
job.
ps I light the dark recesses with a, um..., LV lamp :-)


Andy Dingley <dingbat@codesmiths.com>

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Jan 17, 2007, 10:45:30 AM1/17/07
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

> > Are there such things as whirly *plastic* scrubbing brushes for an angle
> > grinder?
>
> Yes - Wickes, for one, do them. Sort of heavy duty pan scourer. Great for
> removing paint and light rust.

3M do some excellent dense mesh ones of these, especially the one
that's a three-lobed blob rather than a circle. It avoids the usual
risk of scratches from the disk edge. They also have some good "plastic
bristle" pads that are a flat disk with axial bristles. Good for
stripping paint but expensive and wear rate is high.

If you use the loose mesh paint remover from Screwfix it works
tolerably well on some lighter materials (good for fibreglass) but it
self destructs almost instantly if you catch an edge.

Pete C

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Jan 17, 2007, 1:38:26 PM1/17/07
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On Wed, 17 Jan 2007 01:29:35 GMT, dave <da...@notetnot.anetwork> wrote:

Hi,

Some good info here:

<http://www.diyfaq.org.uk/powertools/anglegrinder.htm>

For light cutting anyhting from a basic 500W one will do, keep an eye
on the sheds/Screwfix/Argos etc for special offers.

Slitting discs are very handy but easily damaged, so get a few of
those. Once worn to a smaller size they're handy for getting in tight
spaces.

Best to practice on some scrap metal before doing anything on the car!

cheers,
Pete.

Ian White

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Jan 17, 2007, 2:21:57 PM1/17/07
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Thanks to you both.


--
Ian White

Julian

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Jan 17, 2007, 4:04:44 PM1/17/07
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"robgraham" <robkg...@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:1169032351.3...@a75g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
>

]>


> How logical - hadn't thought of that and changing disks is a pain I
> agree.
>
> I certainly back up the Screwfix, Lidl, etc route, and will be now
> looking for a 2nd one. Darn that's something else to be found a
> storage place in the workshop!

Especially when your using a wire brush as part of the job, you've got to
remove the guard to accommodate those things making it a Royal PITA! Then
you have to resist the temptation to cut corners by not replacing the guard
prior to abrasive disc use, as the day wears on the temptation grows.....

Julian.


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