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TOT: phones at school

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Scott

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Feb 19, 2024, 3:15:53 PMFeb 19
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I see the Poms are trying to ban school pupils using mobile phones
during the school day, including lunchtime. How is this supposed to
work? I would refuse to be searched by anyone other than a police
officer acting on suspicion of criminal conduct. I would exercise my
right to leave the curtilage during lunchtime. And I would communicate
as I saw fit. All subject to negotiation with my parents of course :-)

Colin Bignell

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Feb 19, 2024, 3:54:02 PMFeb 19
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From the sound of it, you would work your way down the system, until
you ended up in a school that can only suspend pupils, as there is
nowhere else to go if they expel them.

--
Colin Bignell

Scott

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Feb 19, 2024, 3:57:40 PMFeb 19
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I was not so much stating my personal intent as proposing a scenario
for debate. FWIW I think they would struggle to expel anyone for not
following non-statutory guidance.

GB

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Feb 19, 2024, 4:06:00 PMFeb 19
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Surely, most school rules have nothing to do with statute?



Scott

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Feb 19, 2024, 4:17:34 PMFeb 19
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On Mon, 19 Feb 2024 21:05:55 +0000, GB <NOTso...@microsoft.invalid>
wrote:
But do school rules apply outside the school? The suggestion is that
pupils will not be allowed to use mobile phones outside school
premises during the lunch break.

Joe

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Feb 19, 2024, 4:31:57 PMFeb 19
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In the UK, schools are legally responsible for the safety of pupils
until the end of the day. The school will normally require written
instructions from parents to allow the pupils to leave the premises
during the day.

--
Joe

alan_m

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Feb 19, 2024, 4:58:48 PMFeb 19
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On 19/02/2024 20:15, Scott wrote:
By all accounts from the Head Teacher's union its already implemented in
may UK schools. It's political sound bite with no value.

--
mailto : news {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk

GB

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Feb 20, 2024, 4:06:39 AMFeb 20
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On 19/02/2024 21:17, Scott wrote:
>>>
>>> I was not so much stating my personal intent as proposing a scenario
>>> for debate. FWIW I think they would struggle to expel anyone for not
>>> following non-statutory guidance.
>>
>> Surely, most school rules have nothing to do with statute?
>
> But do school rules apply outside the school?

Yes, of course they do.


Scott

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Feb 20, 2024, 4:35:17 AMFeb 20
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On Mon, 19 Feb 2024 21:31:51 +0000, Joe <j...@jretrading.com> wrote:
[snip]
>
>In the UK, schools are legally responsible for the safety of pupils
>until the end of the day. The school will normally require written
>instructions from parents to allow the pupils to leave the premises
>during the day.

Okay, maybe I am imagining difficulties that don't exist. I just
wondered what other thought (OT).

SteveW

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Feb 20, 2024, 4:40:02 AMFeb 20
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On 19/02/2024 20:15, Scott wrote:
My sons' school bans mobile phone use ont he premises. If caught using
one, the phone is confiscated for a week and must be collected by a
parent. Any teacher can override the rule to allow online research in
class or to save a pupil trekking to the other side of the school and
queuing to use the school phone, if a pupil needs to contact a parent.

The system works well.

As for being searched, that is not necessary, as phones can be carried,
just not used. Although teachers *DO* have the power to search a pupil
for weapons or substances and phones could be considered to be under the
same permissions, as they can be used for bullying.

Leaving school at lunchtime is not an option. With almost 2000 pupils,
the problems in the area (especially in the local supermarket) of large
numbers of children at the same time would cause local resentment, so
pupils are not allowed off the premises.

SteveW

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Feb 20, 2024, 4:43:21 AMFeb 20
to
Yes. From at least when our eldest son started in year 7 (secondary
school), they have not allowed mobile phones to be used in my sons'
school - except under instruction of a teacher. He is now in his 3rd
year of university.

Scott

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Feb 20, 2024, 7:38:15 AMFeb 20
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On Tue, 20 Feb 2024 09:39:56 +0000, SteveW <st...@walker-family.me.uk>
wrote:
Okay, this shows how out of date I am about school issues.

John Rumm

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Feb 20, 2024, 8:07:27 AMFeb 20
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On 20/02/2024 09:39, SteveW wrote:
> On 19/02/2024 20:15, Scott wrote:
>> I see the Poms are trying to ban school pupils using mobile phones
>> during the school day, including lunchtime. How is this supposed to
>> work? I would refuse to be searched by anyone other than a police
>> officer acting on suspicion of criminal conduct. I would exercise my
>> right to leave the curtilage during lunchtime. And I would communicate
>> as I saw fit. All subject to negotiation with my parents of course :-)
>
> My sons' school bans mobile phone use ont he premises. If caught using
> one, the phone is confiscated for a week and must be collected by a
> parent. Any teacher can override the rule to allow online research in
> class or to save a pupil trekking to the other side of the school and
> queuing to use the school phone, if a pupil needs to contact a parent.

ISTR that the same applied in our son's and our daughter's schools. The
implementations were subtly different in each, but amounted to you could
have your phone at school, but not use it unless it was deemed necessary
/ helpful for a lesson.

> The system works well.

Yup, I think most were of the same opinion - especially beneficial not
having to compete for attention with screens.

> As for being searched, that is not necessary, as phones can be carried,
> just not used. Although teachers *DO* have the power to search a pupil
> for weapons or substances and phones could be considered to be under the
> same permissions, as they can be used for bullying.
>
> Leaving school at lunchtime is not an option. With almost 2000 pupils,
> the problems in the area (especially in the local supermarket) of large
> numbers of children at the same time would cause local resentment, so
> pupils are not allowed off the premises.

I think ours could leave premises once in the sixth form...

--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\=================================================================/

SteveW

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Feb 20, 2024, 12:47:32 PMFeb 20
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Yes, that's actually the case for their 6th form too. I just didn't
include that in the pupil numbers, as it is a completely separate
building, with it's own head, it's own cafeteria, etc. and does not come
under the control of the main school.


Scott

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Feb 20, 2024, 1:11:23 PMFeb 20
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What? I could leave the premises from primary school onwards. I went
home for my lunch.

charles

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Feb 20, 2024, 1:35:08 PMFeb 20
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In article <ur2oje$2k6np$1...@dont-email.me>, SteveW
Sounds like a Sixth Form College

--
from KT24 in Surrey, England - sent from my RISC OS 4t้ฒ
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle

SteveW

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Feb 20, 2024, 5:03:36 PMFeb 20
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Yes, but it is within the grounds of and officially part of the main
school. Although run by its own head the entire school's reception is in
the 6th form building and teachers do move between the two parts. It is
both part of the main school and a separate 6th form college at the same
time.

SteveW

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Feb 20, 2024, 5:08:55 PMFeb 20
to
In infants I stayed for lunch, in juniors I went home for lunch most of
the time, but stayed with a packed lunch some of the time. At secondary,
I either stayed in the school, playing cards or badminton or went to the
chip shop and then to a friend's house to mess around with his railway
or fiddle about on the computer. We had an hour and a quarter for lunch.

In my son's school, a) they only get 30 minutes for lunch, so there is
no time to go anywhere and b) nearly 2000 kids invading the local Tesco
at lunchtime would be impossible, so they are not allowed out at all.

The disappearance of smaller secondary schools and the expansion of a
few large ones has pretty well dictated that no-one can go out at lunchtime.

Bob Eager

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Feb 20, 2024, 5:39:39 PMFeb 20
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On Tue, 20 Feb 2024 22:03:30 +0000, SteveW wrote:

>> Sounds like a Sixth Form College

> Yes, but it is within the grounds of and officially part of the main
> school. Although run by its own head the entire school's reception is in
> the 6th form building and teachers do move between the two parts. It is
> both part of the main school and a separate 6th form college at the same
> time.

Similar round here. But on the same site are: 6th form college, secondary
school, junior school, nursery, pupil referral unit, and a special one.

--
My posts are my copyright and if @diy_forums or Home Owners' Hub
wish to copy them they can pay me £1 a message.
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK: http://www.mirrorservice.org
*lightning surge protection* - a w_tom conductor

Joe

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Feb 20, 2024, 6:15:11 PMFeb 20
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On Tue, 20 Feb 2024 18:11:19 +0000
Scott <newsg...@gefion.myzen.co.uk> wrote:


>
> What? I could leave the premises from primary school onwards. I went
> home for my lunch.

Yes, so could I, and a number of primary pupils went home for lunch,
primary schools generally serving smaller catchment areas then.

But in all cases, the parents had to have given written permission for
this (only once).

--
Joe

alan_m

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Feb 21, 2024, 4:02:44 AMFeb 21
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These days primary pupils don't do "walk to school" on their own.

Rod Speed

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Feb 21, 2024, 4:10:08 AMFeb 21
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On Wed, 21 Feb 2024 20:02:38 +1100, alan_m <ju...@admac.myzen.co.uk> wrote:

> On 20/02/2024 23:15, Joe wrote:
>> On Tue, 20 Feb 2024 18:11:19 +0000
>> Scott <newsg...@gefion.myzen.co.uk> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> What? I could leave the premises from primary school onwards. I went
>>> home for my lunch.
>> Yes, so could I, and a number of primary pupils went home for lunch,
>> primary schools generally serving smaller catchment areas then.
>> But in all cases, the parents had to have given written permission for
>> this (only once).
>>
>
> These days primary pupils don't do "walk to school" on their own.

BULLSHIT

Scott

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Feb 21, 2024, 4:49:57 AMFeb 21
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On Wed, 21 Feb 2024 09:02:38 +0000, alan_m <ju...@admac.myzen.co.uk>
wrote:

>On 20/02/2024 23:15, Joe wrote:
>> On Tue, 20 Feb 2024 18:11:19 +0000
>> Scott <newsg...@gefion.myzen.co.uk> wrote:
>>
>>> What? I could leave the premises from primary school onwards. I went
>>> home for my lunch.
>>
>> Yes, so could I, and a number of primary pupils went home for lunch,
>> primary schools generally serving smaller catchment areas then.
>>
>> But in all cases, the parents had to have given written permission for
>> this (only once).
>>
>These days primary pupils don't do "walk to school" on their own.

I think I was taken to school for the first term only. When I was
about four I was allowed to take my grandfather's dog for a walk as
long as I did not cross any roads. As my mum put it, 'Even if you
don't, the dog will know the way home'.

Peeler

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Feb 21, 2024, 4:55:52 AMFeb 21
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On Wed, 21 Feb 2024 20:09:58 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

<FLUSH the abnormal trolling senile cretin's latest trollshit unread>

--
Richard addressing senile Rodent Speed:
"Shit you're thick/pathetic excuse for a troll."
MID: <ogoa38$pul$1...@news.mixmin.net>

SteveW

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Feb 21, 2024, 6:40:44 AMFeb 21
to
On 21/02/2024 09:02, alan_m wrote:
> On 20/02/2024 23:15, Joe wrote:
>> On Tue, 20 Feb 2024 18:11:19 +0000
>> Scott <newsg...@gefion.myzen.co.uk> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>
>>> What? I could leave the premises from primary school onwards. I went
>>> home for my lunch.
>>
>> Yes, so could I, and a number of primary pupils went home for lunch,
>> primary schools generally serving smaller catchment areas then.
>>
>> But in all cases, the parents had to have given written permission for
>> this (only once).
>>
>
> These days primary pupils don't do "walk to school" on their own.

Things have changed.

My own children are 16, 18 and 21. When they were at primary school, it
was a bit too far to walk (cycling would have been okay). Many pupils
cannot get into their local school and have to travel further or the
local school is poor and best avoided. In our case it was because my
wife wanted them to attend the church school that she attended and also
that gave priority access to the church secondary school, which was very
good academically.

The school rules prevented any child below year 5 (might have been 6)
from leaving the school unless an adult was there to pick them up, so
for many, walking or cycling home alone was not an option - even if they
lived in the houses opposite the school! They would not even allow older
siblings to walk them home.

On arrival in the morning, parents were *required* to stay until the
school bell rang and they all lined up to go in.

Rod Speed

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Feb 21, 2024, 12:48:48 PMFeb 21
to
On Wed, 21 Feb 2024 22:40:39 +1100, SteveW <st...@walker-family.me.uk>
wrote:
Stupid approach and none of ours do it like that.

> On arrival in the morning, parents were *required* to stay until the
> school bell rang and they all lined up to go in.

Ditto.

Most show up on the school bus, but that's because
its too far for the younger primary school kids.

Plenty do still walk or ride their bike unaccomanied.

Even the ones waiting for the bus are unaccompanied by any adult.

Peeler

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Feb 21, 2024, 1:03:19 PMFeb 21
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On Thu, 22 Feb 2024 04:48:36 +1100, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
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