Loft Floor Material

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Joe

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Nov 20, 2008, 1:15:35 PM11/20/08
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Hi all,

Looking for a cheap(er) way to loft the floor than those B&Q Diy packs
that are for sale. The loft floors quite a big area so would be pretty
expensive for those. Would I be better just buying 6x4 chipboard and
cutting it up or is there alternatives out there..
Cheers

Joe.

stuart noble

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Nov 20, 2008, 1:49:59 PM11/20/08
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They do 8x2 flooring chip (if you can get it through the hatch)

Man at B&Q

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Nov 20, 2008, 2:58:34 PM11/20/08
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The problem with cutting the larger sheets is that you have no T+G at
any of the joints. You'll have to cut every piece to fit exactly so
that all the ends are supported on the joists.

MBQ


Dave

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Nov 20, 2008, 4:30:30 PM11/20/08
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Personally, I would use floor boards spaced 2 inches apart. Far lighter
and cheaper if bought from a timber merchant.

Dave

George (dicegeorge)

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Nov 20, 2008, 5:27:17 PM11/20/08
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re:
>>> Looking for a cheap(er) way to loft the floor xxxxxxxx
> Dave writ

>
> Personally, I would use floor boards spaced 2 inches apart. Far lighter
> and cheaper if bought from a timber merchant.
>

Why the 2" gap?
draughts and dropped bits could get through the gaps...

[g]



Dave

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Nov 20, 2008, 6:13:33 PM11/20/08
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If you suffer drafts, then you always will, no matter what the gaps are.
Drafts through the insulation are bad news and need to be sorted.

The reason for the gaps is to allow you to put less weight on the floor
than it was designed to take and still navigate it with relative safety.
No gaps in an old house, but the floor of a relatively new one will not
take lightly (no pun intended) to the weight of chip board loading it
down. Though there have been arguments that the boxing effect raises the
strength of the loft floor. I am not sure on that.

Dave

meow...@care2.com

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Nov 20, 2008, 8:17:57 PM11/20/08
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Dave wrote:
> George (dicegeorge) wrote:
> > re:

> >>>> Looking for a cheap(er) way to loft the floor xxxxxxxx

> No gaps in an old house, but the floor of a relatively new one will not
> take lightly (no pun intended) to the weight of chip board loading it
> down. Though there have been arguments that the boxing effect raises the
> strength of the loft floor.

precisely. Also the weight of the chip is fairly trivial.

Depends how brassic you are, but the very cheapest floorintg is free
discarded half inch chip. If you end up with veneered/melamine, paint
it with glue with something in after fitting to give it some grip.


NT

RW

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Nov 21, 2008, 1:29:30 AM11/21/08
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"Joe" <joero...@googlemail.com> wrote in message
news:8bda087f-173e-4d0c...@l14g2000yqj.googlegroups.com...

For the true *Pikey* solution

Pallet planks

YKIMS


Andy Dingley

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Nov 21, 2008, 6:05:13 AM11/21/08
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On 20 Nov, 18:49, stuart noble <stuart_no...@ntlworld.com> wrote:

> They do 8x2 flooring chip (if you can get it through the hatch)

I'd always use OSB rather than small-chip chipboard. Less sag over
time, less prone to moisture-related sag and a bit lighter all round.
If you can't buy it as 8x2, then the seller will rip it down for you.
Probably makes transport easier too.

George (dicegeorge)

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Nov 21, 2008, 5:25:57 PM11/21/08
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>> Looking for a cheap(er) way to loft the floor than those B&Q Diy packs
>> that are for sale. xxxxxxx>>
>> Joe.
>

I've been up in my loft for a few days insulating -
the floor depends what you want to do with it,
if you just want to store a few things
or if you're gonna let teenagers play in it
in which case it must be a lot tougher...

I've been laying kingspan over the rafters,
but if i step on them it can dent
so i've laid a few thin bits of plywood on it
and an upside down pallet in the middle -
I'm not going to let anyone else up there
so i dont need chipboard etc...

[g]

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