washing machine connection

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sm_jamieson

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Sep 3, 2012, 6:28:58 AM9/3/12
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Just found this somewhere:

The machine’s flexible hose is for disposing of waste water. It must discharge into a waste pipe or trap above the level of the top of the drum. The option is to hook the hose into the top of an open standpipe with a P-trap and the bottom. The waste pipe should through the outside wall to a hopper head or gully. An air gap at the top of the standpipe is important to stop back-siphonage of dirty water into the machine.
Manufacturers will recommend that you use a standpipe and insurers and water companies often insist on it being in place. But if you find it easier to position your washing machine next to a sink you can change the sink trap to a washing machine trap, saving space.

1. Whats this bit about insurance companies and manufacturers wanting a stand pipe ?

2. The washing machine outlet must discharge at a level higher than the drum ?
My washing machine pipe is formed into a U to create a trap, then straight into a soil pipe via one of those 4-way waste manifolds. Much lower than the drum all the way, and no problems.

Is this info rubbish, or is there something I should know about ?

Simon.

David WE Roberts

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Sep 3, 2012, 8:33:23 AM9/3/12
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"sm_jamieson" <sm_ja...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:6807dbb5-5534-433b...@googlegroups.com...
Just found this somewhere:

The machine�s flexible hose is for disposing of waste water. It must
**********************************************************************

The one issue with some washing machines is that if you have the highest
point of the outlet pipe lower than the fill level of the water, they start
to empty during the fill cycle and then just sit there pissing water down
the drain.
More likely to be a problem with older machines which use more water than
modern ones.

--
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[Not even bunny]

Helmuth von Moltke the Elder

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(='.'=)
(")_(")

Andrew Gabriel

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Sep 3, 2012, 3:46:07 PM9/3/12
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In article <6807dbb5-5534-433b...@googlegroups.com>,
sm_jamieson <sm_ja...@hotmail.com> writes:
> Just found this somewhere:
>
> The machine's flexible hose is for disposing of waste water. It must disc
> harge into a waste pipe or trap above the level of the top of the drum. The

That's not quite true - it must be looped up above the max fill level.
The discharge point can however be lower.

> option is to hook the hose into the top of an open standpipe with a P-trap
> and the bottom. The waste pipe should through the outside wall to a hopper
> head or gully. An air gap at the top of the standpipe is important to stop
> back-siphonage of dirty water into the machine.

True, and pushing the hose in too far so the end is under the u-trap
water level is not good.

> Manufacturers will recommend that you use a standpipe and insurers and wate
> r companies often insist on it being in place. But if you find it easier to
> position your washing machine next to a sink you can change the sink trap
> to a washing machine trap, saving space.
>
> 1. Whats this bit about insurance companies and manufacturers wanting a sta
> nd pipe ?

No idea. What makes you think that what you found has any validity?

> 2. The washing machine outlet must discharge at a level higher than the dru
> m ?
> My washing machine pipe is formed into a U to create a trap, then straight
> into a soil pipe via one of those 4-way waste manifolds. Much lower than th
> e drum all the way, and no problems.

The pipe must loop up higher than the highest water level in the drum
(plus a margin), or the machine won't be able to fill to that level,
as it will run out the waste pipe. The highest water level in the drum
is always below the drum centre (the drum bearing seal is not designed
to be submerged). The highest fill levels tend to be the rinses, and
on some machines, the wool wash program (since woollens mustn't be
repeatedly lifted out and dropped back into the water).

Washing machines don't close off the waste pipe, they rely on having
to pump over a raised section of the pipe when they need to empty out.

> Is this info rubbish, or is there something I should know about ?

There's some truth to the info, but it's not a good complete
unambigous description.

Your setup cannot be as you describe, as the machine would never fill.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]

NT

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Sep 4, 2012, 6:00:20 AM9/4/12
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There is. I woudn't never recommend just sticking the pipe in
unsealed, washing machines chuck out all sorts of muck on occasion,
and an unsealed connection is an invitation to flood.


NT

stuart noble

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Sep 4, 2012, 7:09:43 AM9/4/12
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On 04/09/2012 11:00, NT wrote:
> On 3 Sep, 11:28, sm_jamieson <sm_jamie...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>> Just found this somewhere:
>>
>> The machine�s flexible hose is for disposing of waste water. It
There has to be a good reason why an open standpipe is the norm

Bob Eager

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Sep 4, 2012, 8:25:19 AM9/4/12
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On Tue, 04 Sep 2012 12:09:43 +0100, stuart noble wrote:

> On 04/09/2012 11:00, NT wrote:
>> On 3 Sep, 11:28, sm_jamieson <sm_jamie...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>> Just found this somewhere:
>>>
>>> The machine’s flexible hose is for disposing of waste water. It must
Better than it backing into the washing machine, IMHO.

I put in an open standpipe 20 years ago, and it's never given any trouble.

--
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http://www.mirrorservice.org

*lightning protection* - a w_tom conductor

NT

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Sep 4, 2012, 1:52:21 PM9/4/12
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its cheap and consumer easy

> Better than it backing into the washing machine, IMHO.

that won't happen if its plumbed sensibly.

> I put in an open standpipe 20 years ago, and it's never given any trouble.

usually the way. But if your waste pipe blocks, and sometimes they do,
you can say bye bye to your kitchen cabinets, carpets, some furniture
and appliances. It only takes a simple connector to do it properly.
Failing to do so is a false economy imho.

Before someone says insurance, claims too often result in enough
premium hike to get the full amount back again, and a load of
unnecessary hassle is just... unnecessary.


NT

Bob Eager

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Sep 4, 2012, 2:21:49 PM9/4/12
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Utility room with concrete floor and washable flooring.

NT

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Sep 4, 2012, 2:58:00 PM9/4/12
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Indeed. A lot of folk don't have that though.


NT

sm_jamieson

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Sep 4, 2012, 2:59:16 PM9/4/12
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I've just checked and it is. From the outlet pipe its downhill all the way to the waste connection.
Maybe my machine has some kind of valve to stop it draining.
Simon.

SteveW

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Sep 4, 2012, 4:11:43 PM9/4/12
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But at what height does the outlet pipe come out? The pump (and the
internal) part of the pipe will be at the bottom of the machine, but the
outlet pipe may feed up internally or externally before leaving the
machine high up - effectively giving you a fixed high point.

SteveW

PeterC

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Sep 4, 2012, 4:54:30 PM9/4/12
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On Tue, 4 Sep 2012 11:59:16 -0700 (PDT), sm_jamieson wrote:

>> Washing machines don't close off the waste pipe, they rely on having
>>
>> to pump over a raised section of the pipe when they need to empty out.
>>
>>> Is this info rubbish, or is there something I should know about ?
>>
>> There's some truth to the info, but it's not a good complete
>>
>> unambigous description.
>>
>> Your setup cannot be as you describe, as the machine would never fill.
>>
> I've just checked and it is. From the outlet pipe its downhill all the way to the waste connection.
> Maybe my machine has some kind of valve to stop it draining.
> Simon.

The Miele that I installed (for somebody else) about 12 years ago could be
run straight down to a drain as it had a valve of some sort. It could also
pump high enough to get the water out of a cellar to a drain, IIRC, 10'
above.
Most machines though will just siphon out if the pipe's not high enough.
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
whilst religions hold sway

sm_jamieson

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Sep 5, 2012, 4:17:11 AM9/5/12
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The pipe exits the machine about 6 inches from the floor and is downhill all the way to a waste manifold at the bottom of the soil pipe (with a small U-bend formed out of the pipe). It would certainly be a good design for the outlet to have an upward loop internally, since the position the user places the outlet pipe should not fundamentally affect the functioning of the machine.
Simon.

Andrew Gabriel

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Sep 5, 2012, 11:17:51 AM9/5/12
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In article <aama9f...@mid.individual.net>,
Not sure I'd agree there.

> I put in an open standpipe 20 years ago, and it's never given any trouble.

Only problem I've had with a standpipe was some tenants who managed
to pull it out, then run the machine several times, and then wait for
2 weeks before telling us there was a nasty smell in the kitchen,
by which time �5000+ of solid maple flooring was written off.
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