Gap between door casing and architrave - how to fill?

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R D S

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May 24, 2022, 9:57:04 AMMay 24
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I've overboarded a wall and as such i've a half inch gap between the
architrave and the door casing, internally.

Gut feeling... Foam, trimmed when gone off then thumbed in a mm or two
then sandable filler?

Any opinions?

The Natural Philosopher

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May 24, 2022, 11:43:46 AMMay 24
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should work. Or you can use about anything to to the mass fill -
polyfilla is good

If there is likely to be movement use decorators caulk for the top finish


--
You can get much farther with a kind word and a gun than you can with a
kind word alone.

Al Capone


Roger Mills

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May 24, 2022, 12:08:08 PMMay 24
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On 24/05/2022 14:56, R D S wrote:
I would have removed the architrave, extended the door casings into the
room using some strips of wood the same thickness as the boards, and
then boarded up to the strips and re-fitted the architrave to cover the
edge of the board.
--
Cheers,
Roger

Fredxx

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May 24, 2022, 12:26:32 PMMay 24
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On 24/05/2022 14:56, R D S wrote:
I have the same problem and intending to fill the gap with PAR timber
flush with the door casing and refit with a new architrave.

John Rumm

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May 24, 2022, 1:05:09 PMMay 24
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On 24/05/2022 14:56, R D S wrote:
Do you mean a gap between the back of the architrave and the wall, or
between the architrave and the door frame because the plasterboard now
stands proud of the door lining?

If the latter:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Hanging_a_door#Fitting_the_architraves


--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
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| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\=================================================================/

R D S

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May 25, 2022, 5:41:57 AMMay 25
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On 24/05/2022 17:08, Roger Mills wrote:
> On 24/05/2022 14:56, R D S wrote:
>> I've overboarded a wall and as such i've a half inch gap between the
>> architrave and the door casing, internally.
>>
>> Gut feeling... Foam, trimmed when gone off then thumbed in a mm or two
>> then sandable filler?
>>
>> Any opinions?
>
> I would have removed the architrave, extended the door casings into the
> room

You've made me think...
The door casing is only held in with foam and has no architrave on the
other side under the stairs, i'll pull it out and refit it an inch forward.

R D S

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May 25, 2022, 6:33:10 AMMay 25
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On 24/05/2022 18:05, John Rumm wrote:
> http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Hanging_a_door#Fitting_the_architraves
>

"and want to be set back from the edge of the lining by 5 to 10mm
depending on preference"

Now why is that, i've gone to pains to make them flush!
(To make any potential filling easier, except as I think about it it
wouldn't really have made any difference..

John Rumm

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May 25, 2022, 12:55:48 PMMay 25
to
On 25/05/2022 11:33, R D S wrote:
> On 24/05/2022 18:05, John Rumm wrote:
>> http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Hanging_a_door#Fitting_the_architraves
>>
>>
>
> "and want to be set back from the edge of the lining by 5 to 10mm
> depending on preference"
>
> Now why is that, i've gone to pains to make them flush!

Like most of these building "rules", because it was decided at some
point that it looks better... however there is usually a practical
element as well - if you fix things flush, then you can normally
guarantee they won't remain so with seasonal wood movement - so better
to make a feature of the reveal rather than have a line that splits the
paint each season.

Andrew

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May 25, 2022, 1:14:20 PMMay 25
to
On 25/05/2022 17:55, John Rumm wrote:
> On 25/05/2022 11:33, R D S wrote:
>> On 24/05/2022 18:05, John Rumm wrote:
>>> http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Hanging_a_door#Fitting_the_architraves
>>>
>>>
>>
>> "and want to be set back from the edge of the lining by 5 to 10mm
>> depending on preference"
>>
>> Now why is that, i've gone to pains to make them flush!
>
> Like most of these building "rules", because it was decided at some
> point that it looks better...  however there is usually a practical
> element as well - if you fix things flush, then you can normally
> guarantee they won't remain so with seasonal wood movement - so better
> to make a feature of the reveal rather than have a line that splits the
> paint each season.
>
>

Apparently having some sort of gap or inwards step in the plasterboard
around door linings is the 'modern' way -


https://www.doors4uk.co.uk/bespoke-doors-with-shadow-gap-frames

But anyone who has resorted to some sort of DIY plastering around
door linings is probably glad to use some sort of architrave trim
to hide the result :-)

R D S

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May 25, 2022, 2:17:13 PMMay 25
to
On 25/05/2022 17:55, John Rumm wrote:
> On 25/05/2022 11:33, R D S wrote:
>> On 24/05/2022 18:05, John Rumm wrote:
>>> http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Hanging_a_door#Fitting_the_architraves
>>>
>>>
>>
>> "and want to be set back from the edge of the lining by 5 to 10mm
>> depending on preference"
>>
>> Now why is that, i've gone to pains to make them flush!
>
> Like most of these building "rules", because it was decided at some
> point that it looks better...  however there is usually a practical
> element as well- if you fix things flush, then you can normally
> guarantee they won't remain so with seasonal wood movement - so better
> to make a feature of the reveal rather than have a line that splits the
> paint each season.
>

Interesting. And my hinges won't go back the same way without some
chipping away.

John Rumm

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May 26, 2022, 10:22:55 AMMay 26
to
On 25/05/2022 18:14, Andrew wrote:
> On 25/05/2022 17:55, John Rumm wrote:
>> On 25/05/2022 11:33, R D S wrote:
>>> On 24/05/2022 18:05, John Rumm wrote:
>>>> http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Hanging_a_door#Fitting_the_architraves
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> "and want to be set back from the edge of the lining by 5 to 10mm
>>> depending on preference"
>>>
>>> Now why is that, i've gone to pains to make them flush!
>>
>> Like most of these building "rules", because it was decided at some
>> point that it looks better...  however there is usually a practical
>> element as well - if you fix things flush, then you can normally
>> guarantee they won't remain so with seasonal wood movement - so better
>> to make a feature of the reveal rather than have a line that splits
>> the paint each season.
>>
>>
>
> Apparently having some sort of gap or inwards step in the plasterboard
> around door linings is the 'modern' way -
>
>
> https://www.doors4uk.co.uk/bespoke-doors-with-shadow-gap-frames

Now there's ugly for you :-)

(not to mention built in dust traps, with lots of places for shrinkage
and settlement cracks to become visible)


> But anyone who has resorted to some sort of DIY plastering around
> door linings is probably glad to use some sort of architrave trim
> to hide the result :-)

Indeed... and that is one of the reasons these things are traditionally
done, so you can fit square and plumb lining to what might not be a
perfectly matching hole in the wall, and then "tune"[1] it to the door
to get even looking gaps all round. Ultimately you need a way of hiding
the mechanisms used to make this all work from view.

[1] i.e. when you fix the lining, you want it square and level, but the
opening might not be, so you need packers to bring it square and plumb -
leaving visible packers and gaps behind the lining. Then once the door
is hung, you want the gap to be even all round, so you can hammer wedges
between the opening and the lining to move the frame slightly (which
will be fixed in the centre of the board deliberately so the edges can
move).

Hence on reason why you have architraves to hide any gaps, packers, and
wedges.
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