Radial saws?

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T i m

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Apr 17, 2010, 2:14:27 PM4/17/10
to
Hi All,

I hope to be cutting up a batch of 4x2" and I thought I'd treat myself
to one of the basic compound / mitre saws as sold by Argos / Homebase
/ Screwfix (~�35).

http://preview.tinyurl.com/y3s86po

http://preview.tinyurl.com/yyoxcxp

http://preview.tinyurl.com/y5pku77

.. but feel one of the ones that move out over a wider span (Radial
saw?) might be more useful long-term (laminate flooring, workshop
shelves etc).

However, there seems to be a big price jump from said 'basic' saws to
anything that slides (over double from what I've found so far) so it
starts being something that may need a bit more consideration if I'm
to go that way.

So, based on the fact that I'm more into metalwork / machinery than
woodwork these days (so it's probably not going to see *loads* of use
or fancy work), are there any useable but cheap offerings out there
and if so what please?

Cheers, T i m

stuart noble

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Apr 17, 2010, 3:06:34 PM4/17/10
to

Don't think there's any such thing as a cheap radial arm saw. Any play
in the bearings and they're worse than useless.

Andy Dingley

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Apr 17, 2010, 3:07:37 PM4/17/10
to
On 17 Apr, 19:14, T i m <n...@spaced.me.uk> wrote:

> However, there seems to be a big price jump from said 'basic' saws to
> anything that slides

Not necessarily - just the more sophisticated sliders.

There are two reasons for sliding: wider cuts, and also half-depth
cuts to make halved joints.

If you're just butting things and only need a chop action, then a
purely swinging chop saw with a decent size blade will probably do you
right, and for less money.

If you're making bigger things and want to cut dados, look for a real
radial arm saw (bargains S/H) which is great at doing this, but so
inflexible that many buy them and get rid in disappointment (they
don't replace a cabinet saw).

In the middle ground, yes, sliders cost a whole lot more. Oddly not
Aldi's though, which makes a great on-site carpentry saw and cost
fivepence ha'penny. If you do plan to cut joints with these though,
you're looking at a usable depth stop and some precision (probably a
Makita with the top slide bars) and yes, it'll cost.

T i m

unread,
Apr 17, 2010, 3:14:32 PM4/17/10
to
On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 20:06:34 +0100, stuart noble
<stuart...@ntlworld.com> wrote:

>
>Don't think there's any such thing as a cheap radial arm saw. Any play
>in the bearings and they're worse than useless.

I thought that might be a weakness (unless engineered out etc).

Cheers, T i m

T i m

unread,
Apr 17, 2010, 3:31:24 PM4/17/10
to
On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 12:07:37 -0700 (PDT), Andy Dingley
<din...@codesmiths.com> wrote:

>On 17 Apr, 19:14, T i m <n...@spaced.me.uk> wrote:
>
>> However, there seems to be a big price jump from said 'basic' saws to
>> anything that slides
>
>Not necessarily - just the more sophisticated sliders.

Hmm, I couldn't find much under 80 quid. Seems a lot to add a couple
of sliders etc?


>
>There are two reasons for sliding: wider cuts, and also half-depth
>cuts to make halved joints.

Ok.


>
>If you're just butting things and only need a chop action, then a
>purely swinging chop saw with a decent size blade will probably do you
>right, and for less money.

Well, that's all I'm intending now but then that's all it would do
(but I guess better do that well than try to do more badly).


>
>If you're making bigger things and want to cut dados, look for a real
>radial arm saw (bargains S/H) which is great at doing this, but so
>inflexible that many buy them and get rid in disappointment (they
>don't replace a cabinet saw).

OK.


>
>In the middle ground, yes, sliders cost a whole lot more. Oddly not
>Aldi's though, which makes a great on-site carpentry saw and cost
>fivepence ha'penny.

Are they always there or only pop up now and again do you know?

> If you do plan to cut joints with these though,
>you're looking at a usable depth stop and some precision (probably a
>Makita with the top slide bars) and yes, it'll cost.

Hmm ok. I think I'll go for one of the basic saws then, thanks. ;-)

T i m

Harry Bloomfield

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Apr 17, 2010, 4:39:13 PM4/17/10
to
Andy Dingley formulated on Saturday :

> In the middle ground, yes, sliders cost a whole lot more. Oddly not
> Aldi's though, which makes a great on-site carpentry saw and cost
> fivepence ha'penny. If you do plan to cut joints with these though,
> you're looking at a usable depth stop and some precision (probably a
> Makita with the top slide bars) and yes, it'll cost.

...and the first time you need to cut something a little wider, you
will find yourself paying a second time for a sliding mitre saw. I
bought a very capable one from Argos a few months ago for around ᅵ80 -
which was discussed in this ng. I remain delighted with it and it cuts
much better (much more rigid) than either of my two none sliders.

--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk


T i m

unread,
Apr 17, 2010, 5:50:12 PM4/17/10
to
On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 21:39:13 +0100, Harry Bloomfield
<harry...@NOSPAM.tiscali.co.uk> wrote:

>Andy Dingley formulated on Saturday :
>> In the middle ground, yes, sliders cost a whole lot more. Oddly not
>> Aldi's though, which makes a great on-site carpentry saw and cost
>> fivepence ha'penny. If you do plan to cut joints with these though,
>> you're looking at a usable depth stop and some precision (probably a
>> Makita with the top slide bars) and yes, it'll cost.
>
>...and the first time you need to cut something a little wider, you
>will find yourself paying a second time for a sliding mitre saw.

And / or getting the panel / jig / saber / circular saw out? ;-)

> I
>bought a very capable one from Argos a few months ago for around £80 -

>which was discussed in this ng.

I did a search before I asked and nothing came up here under 'radial'
(I haven't used the Google groups thing).

>I remain delighted with it and it cuts
>much better (much more rigid) than either of my two none sliders.

Ok thanks. I've just had a quick look on Argos's site and can't see it
now? Was it an end of line do you know?

Cheers, T i m

Harry Bloomfield

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Apr 17, 2010, 6:10:11 PM4/17/10
to
T i m was thinking very hard :

> I did a search before I asked and nothing came up here under 'radial'
> (I haven't used the Google groups thing).

You are looking for the wrong thing - look for 'sliding mitre saw'.

>
>> I remain delighted with it and it cuts
>> much better (much more rigid) than either of my two none sliders.
>
> Ok thanks. I've just had a quick look on Argos's site and can't see it
> now? Was it an end of line do you know?

Not when I bought it, though I suspect their stock will vary quite
quickly.

Harry Bloomfield

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Apr 17, 2010, 6:18:49 PM4/17/10
to
Harry Bloomfield laid this down on his screen :

> T i m was thinking very hard :
>> I did a search before I asked and nothing came up here under 'radial'
>> (I haven't used the Google groups thing).
>
> You are looking for the wrong thing - look for 'sliding mitre saw'.
>
>>
>>> I remain delighted with it and it cuts much better (much more rigid) than
>>> either of my two none sliders.
>>
>> Ok thanks. I've just had a quick look on Argos's site and can't see it
>> now? Was it an end of line do you know?
>
> Not when I bought it, though I suspect their stock will vary quite quickly.

Got it -

http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/catalogId/1500002201/partNumber/7113079.htm

Roger Mills

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Apr 17, 2010, 6:40:19 PM4/17/10
to
In an earlier contribution to this discussion, Harry Bloomfield


Yes, I've got one of those and, as I have said on earlier occasions, I'm
very impressed with build quality and precision. I would certainly recommend
it. You could pay several times the price for an equivalent 'famous brand'
model. I've screwed mine to a board with a batten underneath - so that it
can easily be clamped in my B&D Workmate.

The only negatives are that the dust collection bag doesn't collect any
dust, and my laser seems to have given up - but I can manage quite well
without that!
--
Cheers,
Roger
_______
Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
checked.


T i m

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Apr 17, 2010, 6:56:17 PM4/17/10
to

Ah, cheers. ;-)

T i m

John Rumm

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Apr 17, 2010, 9:53:40 PM4/17/10
to
T i m wrote:

> I hope to be cutting up a batch of 4x2" and I thought I'd treat myself
> to one of the basic compound / mitre saws as sold by Argos / Homebase
> / Screwfix (~£35).
>
> http://preview.tinyurl.com/y3s86po
>
> http://preview.tinyurl.com/yyoxcxp
>
> http://preview.tinyurl.com/y5pku77

Those will cut 4x2 quickly and easily, although it is worth noting that
with an 8" blade they may not be able to do anything other than straight
cuts - i.e. they won't be able to do a mitre in 4x2.

> ... but feel one of the ones that move out over a wider span (Radial


> saw?) might be more useful long-term (laminate flooring, workshop
> shelves etc).

These are often called Sliding Compound Mitre Saws (SCMS). A radial arm
saw is a saw that dangles down from an overhead arm.

> However, there seems to be a big price jump from said 'basic' saws to
> anything that slides (over double from what I've found so far) so it
> starts being something that may need a bit more consideration if I'm
> to go that way.

Indeed. The mechanism is more complex, and needs to be of a fairly
decent quality if its going to work well and last more than five minutes.

> So, based on the fact that I'm more into metalwork / machinery than
> woodwork these days (so it's probably not going to see *loads* of use
> or fancy work), are there any useable but cheap offerings out there
> and if so what please?

With light use, one of the shed cheapies will probably do you. The usual
problem with many is the slide mechanism becomes sloppy or graunchy with
age and use.

Another solution is to get a decent one second hand... the Makita LS1013
is rated by many as one of the best SCMS about - and you can usually get
these on ebay for 160 - 200.

Getting a decent stand with slide out supports makes them far easier to
use for chopping up long lengths of timber as well - i.e. when doing
framing / studwork etc.

--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\=================================================================/

T i m

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Apr 18, 2010, 2:57:45 AM4/18/10
to
On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 23:40:19 +0100, "Roger Mills"
<watt....@googlemail.com> wrote:


>> Got it -
>>
>> http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/catalogId/1500002201/partNumber/7113079.htm
>
>
>Yes, I've got one of those and, as I have said on earlier occasions, I'm
>very impressed with build quality and precision. I would certainly recommend
>it. You could pay several times the price for an equivalent 'famous brand'
>model.

Thanks Roger.

> I've screwed mine to a board with a batten underneath - so that it
>can easily be clamped in my B&D Workmate.

It looks a bit big from a storage pov though (I mean that sort of
thing in general etc). Is it?


>
>The only negatives are that the dust collection bag doesn't collect any
>dust, and my laser seems to have given up - but I can manage quite well
>without that!

I think unless I was paying proper money I'd envisage any of those
sorts of 'extras' as just that (either they don't work, don't work
well or don't last etc).

Cheers, T i m

mike

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Apr 18, 2010, 3:02:48 AM4/18/10
to
On Apr 18, 2:53 am, John Rumm <see.my.signat...@nowhere.null> wrote:
>The usual
> problem with many is the slide mechanism becomes sloppy or graunchy with
> age and use.


Graunchy?

T i m

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 3:18:45 AM4/18/10
to
On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 02:53:40 +0100, John Rumm
<see.my.s...@nowhere.null> wrote:

>T i m wrote:
>
>> I hope to be cutting up a batch of 4x2" and I thought I'd treat myself
>> to one of the basic compound / mitre saws as sold by Argos / Homebase
>> / Screwfix (~£35).
>>
>> http://preview.tinyurl.com/y3s86po
>>
>> http://preview.tinyurl.com/yyoxcxp
>>
>> http://preview.tinyurl.com/y5pku77
>
>Those will cut 4x2 quickly and easily, although it is worth noting that
>with an 8" blade they may not be able to do anything other than straight
>cuts - i.e. they won't be able to do a mitre in 4x2.

Understood. The thing is I can actually do all I need (and always have
done) with a square, pencil and hand saw. Or a circular saw but I
often can't be bothered to get that out and set it up. They are also
noisy and send the sawdust everywhere. I've hand cut many a thing in
the kitchen and a quick hoover of the floor afterwards you wouldn't
know I'd been there. ;-)

It just that as these sorts of tools become available cheap (in real
terms), the idea of having the cut done quickly and (hopefully) as or
more accurately than I can do by hand becomes more attractive. The
offset being the storage of such kit compared with the hand versions.

I'm also not someone who generally hires stuff either, mainly because
for my typical workload I can buy for what it would cost to hire (so
could give it away afterwards) plus I've generally got a new tool to
use rather than one hat may have had a hard life. I do have a mate
with a SCMS <g> that has said I'm welcome to borrow it but I don't
like borrowing such stuff (for all sorts of reasons).


>
>> ... but feel one of the ones that move out over a wider span (Radial
>> saw?) might be more useful long-term (laminate flooring, workshop
>> shelves etc).
>
>These are often called Sliding Compound Mitre Saws (SCMS). A radial arm
>saw is a saw that dangles down from an overhead arm.

Ah, thanks.


>
>> However, there seems to be a big price jump from said 'basic' saws to
>> anything that slides (over double from what I've found so far) so it
>> starts being something that may need a bit more consideration if I'm
>> to go that way.
>
>Indeed. The mechanism is more complex, and needs to be of a fairly
>decent quality if its going to work well and last more than five minutes.

Ok.


>
>> So, based on the fact that I'm more into metalwork / machinery than
>> woodwork these days (so it's probably not going to see *loads* of use
>> or fancy work), are there any useable but cheap offerings out there
>> and if so what please?
>
>With light use, one of the shed cheapies will probably do you. The usual
>problem with many is the slide mechanism becomes sloppy or graunchy with
>age and use.

Like I said, I'm not so into woodwork these days so it would typically
be used to do the jobs I have to do rather than building cabinets etc
for fun. I have bought tools, partly to use the tool but it wouldn't
be the case for this.


>
>Another solution is to get a decent one second hand... the Makita LS1013
>is rated by many as one of the best SCMS about - and you can usually get
>these on ebay for 160 - 200.

Hmm, that's starting to become 'expensive', especially for the
immediate project (that will mainly be cutting 4x2 at 90 deg). ;-)


>
>Getting a decent stand with slide out supports makes them far easier to
>use for chopping up long lengths of timber as well - i.e. when doing
>framing / studwork etc.

Yeah, I have a carpenter mate with such a rig and it does make the
whole thing so much easier. The trouble is I don't have a lwb Transit
van to keep it all in. I could take it round to him but I don't want
the faff and would rather use the favour on something more important.

Cheers, T i m

T i m

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 3:26:27 AM4/18/10
to
On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 00:02:48 -0700 (PDT), mike <mike...@yahoo.com>
wrote:


Yeah, where something doesn't move smoothly and feels like there is
some (say) metal to metal contact going on?

I'd say one of the worst / typical thing to feel like that would be
the sliders on such a tool. A proper design might have proper bushes
to carry the rails and dust seals to keep the crap out. A cheap design
might have rough castings just drilled out.

Another use of 'graunchy' might be a bearing going bad?

<on the phone to yer Dad as you are looking at his lawnmower for him>
"Yeah, they aren't seized but they feel very graunchy so I'll fit a
new pair for you ..."

Cheers, T i m

Harry Bloomfield

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Apr 18, 2010, 4:41:58 AM4/18/10
to
T i m formulated the question :

>>
>> The only negatives are that the dust collection bag doesn't collect any
>> dust, and my laser seems to have given up - but I can manage quite well
>> without that!
>
> I think unless I was paying proper money I'd envisage any of those
> sorts of 'extras' as just that (either they don't work, don't work
> well or don't last etc).

I agree on the dust bag, but not the laser. The laser on mine was very
accurate, in that you could set it to indicate where it would cut to a
fraction of a millimetre. It is adjustable to indicate the precise left
or right of the cut, but was difficult to see under direct sun. It runs
on a single AA and I had a tendency to forget to switch it off - an
improvement would have been some sort of trigger type switch, so you
cannot leave it on.

It is quite a bulky object to have to store. I ended up making a shelf
for it to fit up between the rafters of my flat roofed garage - but be
warned that the sliders can rust, if not kept well oiled.

The Medway Handyman

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Apr 18, 2010, 4:47:22 AM4/18/10
to

Got fed up with waiting for the Aldi one to reappear in stock, bought one of
these http://www.wickes.co.uk/1500W-Sliding-Compound-Mitre-Saw/invt/200363

Tried in anger on my first deck of the year (50+ sq mtrs) and I like it.

Also small enough that I can keep it in the van all the time.


--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk


Harry Bloomfield

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Apr 18, 2010, 5:07:46 AM4/18/10
to
It happens that The Medway Handyman formulated :

> Got fed up with waiting for the Aldi one to reappear in stock, bought one of
> these http://www.wickes.co.uk/1500W-Sliding-Compound-Mitre-Saw/invt/200363
>
> Tried in anger on my first deck of the year (50+ sq mtrs) and I like it.

Which has a maximum cut of 210mm. The Argos one manages 310mm - which
was the reason I chose it, I had some 300mm wide soffits to cut.

T i m

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 5:21:50 AM4/18/10
to
On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 09:41:58 +0100, Harry Bloomfield
<harry...@NOSPAM.tiscali.co.uk> wrote:

>T i m formulated the question :
>>>
>>> The only negatives are that the dust collection bag doesn't collect any
>>> dust, and my laser seems to have given up - but I can manage quite well
>>> without that!
>>
>> I think unless I was paying proper money I'd envisage any of those
>> sorts of 'extras' as just that (either they don't work, don't work
>> well or don't last etc).
>
>I agree on the dust bag, but not the laser. The laser on mine was very
>accurate, in that you could set it to indicate where it would cut to a
>fraction of a millimetre.

Oh, better than I expected then.

> It is adjustable to indicate the precise left
>or right of the cut, but was difficult to see under direct sun.

Ok.

> It runs
>on a single AA and I had a tendency to forget to switch it off - an
>improvement would have been some sort of trigger type switch, so you
>cannot leave it on.

IR movement sensor from a LED battery lamp? (we bought a couple of the
3 LED / battery / IR movement jobbies from B&Q and I'd have to say
they are pretty good. If somewhere is completely dark and you walk
into it they come on instantly and provide enough light to be able to
see your way through etc).

>
>It is quite a bulky object to have to store.

Hmm, that could be a deal breaker.

> I ended up making a shelf
>for it to fit up between the rafters of my flat roofed garage -

<Thinks> I guess it's not too heavy to put (get up into) in the loft?

> but be
>warned that the sliders can rust, if not kept well oiled.

'Well oiled', I like the sound of that! ;-)

Cheers, T i m

T i m

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 5:23:34 AM4/18/10
to
On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 09:47:22 +0100, "The Medway Handyman"
<davi...@no-spam-blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:


>Got fed up with waiting for the Aldi one to reappear in stock, bought one of
>these http://www.wickes.co.uk/1500W-Sliding-Compound-Mitre-Saw/invt/200363

Starting to creep up in price (ok for you though etc).


>
>Tried in anger on my first deck of the year (50+ sq mtrs) and I like it.

Gdgd


>
>Also small enough that I can keep it in the van all the time.

Bit of a trek for me though. ;-(

Cheers, T i m

Roger Mills

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 7:25:56 AM4/18/10
to
In an earlier contribution to this discussion, T i m

<ne...@spaced.me.uk> wrote:
> On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 23:40:19 +0100, "Roger Mills"
> <watt....@googlemail.com> wrote:
>
>> I've screwed mine to a board with a batten underneath - so that it
>> can easily be clamped in my B&D Workmate.
>
> It looks a bit big from a storage pov though (I mean that sort of
> thing in general etc). Is it?

Well, it's bigger than a hand-held circular saw, for sure. I park mine on
top of my table saw when it's not in use.
http://www.mills37.plus.com/Saw_park.JPG

And this is what it looks like mounted on the Workmate, ready for use:
http://www.mills37.plus.com/Saw_use.JPG

The Medway Handyman

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Apr 18, 2010, 7:37:23 AM4/18/10
to
Harry Bloomfield wrote:
> It happens that The Medway Handyman formulated :
>> Got fed up with waiting for the Aldi one to reappear in stock,
>> bought one of these
>> http://www.wickes.co.uk/1500W-Sliding-Compound-Mitre-Saw/invt/200363
>> Tried in anger on my first deck of the year (50+ sq mtrs) and I like
>> it.
>
> Which has a maximum cut of 210mm. The Argos one manages 310mm - which
> was the reason I chose it, I had some 300mm wide soffits to cut.

I've got an old Axminster which will do 300mm but its far too big a beast to
carry in a Kangoo van. 90% of my needs are to cut a maximum of 6 x 2 & 6"
deck boards.

Horses etc

The Medway Handyman

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 7:39:42 AM4/18/10
to
T i m wrote:
> On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 09:47:22 +0100, "The Medway Handyman"
> <davi...@no-spam-blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
>
>
>> Got fed up with waiting for the Aldi one to reappear in stock,
>> bought one of these
>> http://www.wickes.co.uk/1500W-Sliding-Compound-Mitre-Saw/invt/200363
>
> Starting to creep up in price (ok for you though etc).

I've got one of them Wickes points cards, so I had £30 worth of vouchers.
That made it a good deal for me.

>> Tried in anger on my first deck of the year (50+ sq mtrs) and I like
>> it.
>
> Gdgd

Two of us & four days.

TheOldFellow

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 8:24:27 AM4/18/10
to
On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 19:14:27 +0100, T i m wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> I hope to be cutting up a batch of 4x2" and I thought I'd treat myself
> to one of the basic compound / mitre saws as sold by Argos / Homebase /
> Screwfix (~£35).
>
> http://preview.tinyurl.com/y3s86po
>
> http://preview.tinyurl.com/yyoxcxp
>
> http://preview.tinyurl.com/y5pku77
>
> .. but feel one of the ones that move out over a wider span (Radial
> saw?) might be more useful long-term (laminate flooring, workshop
> shelves etc).


I have a Radial Arm Saw that can cut 700mm. But it cost £700 (some time
ago). I would not buy another one. I only use it infrequently as the
time it takes to set it up accurately is a PITA. However, if you ever
need to cut 600-700 wide stuff repeatedly, say to make a wood panel wall
(it can do raised panels too), it's the bee's knees.

R.

Harry Bloomfield

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 10:36:19 AM4/18/10
to
T i m was thinking very hard :
>> I ended up making a shelf
>> for it to fit up between the rafters of my flat roofed garage -
>
> <Thinks> I guess it's not too heavy to put (get up into) in the loft?

7.2Kg, so not particularly heavy just rather awkwardly shaped.

John Rumm

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 10:41:10 AM4/18/10
to
T i m wrote:
> On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 02:53:40 +0100, John Rumm
> <see.my.s...@nowhere.null> wrote:
>
>> T i m wrote:
>>
>>> I hope to be cutting up a batch of 4x2" and I thought I'd treat myself
>>> to one of the basic compound / mitre saws as sold by Argos / Homebase
>>> / Screwfix (~£35).
>>>
>>> http://preview.tinyurl.com/y3s86po
>>>
>>> http://preview.tinyurl.com/yyoxcxp
>>>
>>> http://preview.tinyurl.com/y5pku77
>> Those will cut 4x2 quickly and easily, although it is worth noting that
>> with an 8" blade they may not be able to do anything other than straight
>> cuts - i.e. they won't be able to do a mitre in 4x2.
>
> Understood. The thing is I can actually do all I need (and always have
> done) with a square, pencil and hand saw. Or a circular saw but I
> often can't be bothered to get that out and set it up. They are also
> noisy and send the sawdust everywhere. I've hand cut many a thing in
> the kitchen and a quick hoover of the floor afterwards you wouldn't
> know I'd been there. ;-)
>
> It just that as these sorts of tools become available cheap (in real
> terms), the idea of having the cut done quickly and (hopefully) as or
> more accurately than I can do by hand becomes more attractive. The
> offset being the storage of such kit compared with the hand versions.

Yup, I know what you mean. I did all the studwork for my first proper
workshop with an 8" £30 nutool chop saw. It was cheap (in
construction), flimsy, and not in any way refined. However it would cut
4x2 very quickly, and square enough repeatedly. It was also fairly small
and light. So for jobs like that its much faster than hand sawing. Dust
was not too bad in fact - tending to direct most down and back.

The other things these excel at is when you want a cut that is shaving
half a mm off the end of a stud (or any fraction of a blade kerf) - dead
easy on a chop saw, but difficult to do by hand.


>> With light use, one of the shed cheapies will probably do you. The usual
>> problem with many is the slide mechanism becomes sloppy or graunchy with
>> age and use.
>
> Like I said, I'm not so into woodwork these days so it would typically
> be used to do the jobs I have to do rather than building cabinets etc
> for fun. I have bought tools, partly to use the tool but it wouldn't
> be the case for this.

If you can cope with a chop saw, then they will probably last better at
a lower price point - there is less to go wrong. Even a cheap slider may
be ok since you are not demanding pin point accuracy. The only thing you
need to avoid is one that gets sticky enough to be dangerous (i.e.
requiring too much push and then "letting go" unexpectedly etc).

>> Another solution is to get a decent one second hand... the Makita LS1013
>> is rated by many as one of the best SCMS about - and you can usually get
>> these on ebay for 160 - 200.
>
> Hmm, that's starting to become 'expensive', especially for the
> immediate project (that will mainly be cutting 4x2 at 90 deg). ;-)

Indeed. With a chop saw the price jump from shed mid range to top of the
range is not actually that great. For example:

http://www.lawson-his.co.uk/scripts/details.php?cat=Makita%20Mitre%20Saws&product=62060

The move to a 10" fixed blade is probably a good compromise between an
8" fixed and 8" slider.

>> Getting a decent stand with slide out supports makes them far easier to
>> use for chopping up long lengths of timber as well - i.e. when doing
>> framing / studwork etc.
>
> Yeah, I have a carpenter mate with such a rig and it does make the
> whole thing so much easier. The trouble is I don't have a lwb Transit
> van to keep it all in. I could take it round to him but I don't want
> the faff and would rather use the favour on something more important.

There are a number of fairly light weight alloy ones about that fold up
into something about the size of a small set of golf clubs. Makro do/did
a JCB branded thing for about £60 IIRC that would do the job nicely.

T i m

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 12:15:19 PM4/18/10
to
On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 12:25:56 +0100, "Roger Mills"
<watt....@googlemail.com> wrote:

>In an earlier contribution to this discussion, T i m
><ne...@spaced.me.uk> wrote:
>> On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 23:40:19 +0100, "Roger Mills"
>> <watt....@googlemail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> I've screwed mine to a board with a batten underneath - so that it
>>> can easily be clamped in my B&D Workmate.
>>
>> It looks a bit big from a storage pov though (I mean that sort of
>> thing in general etc). Is it?
>
>Well, it's bigger than a hand-held circular saw, for sure. I park mine on
>top of my table saw when it's not in use.
>http://www.mills37.plus.com/Saw_park.JPG
>
>And this is what it looks like mounted on the Workmate, ready for use:
>http://www.mills37.plus.com/Saw_use.JPG


Thanks for those.

I guess it's not that big but it is quite long and awkwardly shaped.

I really must go though my workshop now the weather is getting
slightly more predictable.

Cheers, T i m

Dave

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 1:17:17 PM4/18/10
to
Harry Bloomfield wrote:

> It is quite a bulky object to have to store. I ended up making a shelf
> for it to fit up between the rafters of my flat roofed garage - but be
> warned that the sliders can rust, if not kept well oiled.

I ended up leaving it in an outside shed for 9 months, because of the
storage problem and I have just been out to look at the slider bars and
they are showing slight corrosion. Trouble is, if you oil them, the wood
will stick to the oil and clog up the bore of he sliders. Under normal
storage conditions, I would have said use graphite powder as a lubricant.

Anyone got any ideas on this pleas?

Dave

Harry Bloomfield

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 1:40:25 PM4/18/10
to
Dave used his keyboard to write :

Angle Gr - sorry. WD40 should be good for that.

Dave

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 5:08:22 PM4/18/10
to
I'll stick to Schobright if you don't mind :-)

Dave

Dave

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 5:25:13 PM4/18/10
to

Make that Scotch bright.

Dave

The Medway Handyman

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 5:37:00 PM4/18/10
to
Roger Mills wrote:
> In an earlier contribution to this discussion, Harry Bloomfield
> <harry...@NOSPAM.tiscali.co.uk> wrote:
>> Harry Bloomfield laid this down on his screen :
>>> T i m was thinking very hard :
>>>> I did a search before I asked and nothing came up here under
>>>> 'radial' (I haven't used the Google groups thing).
>>>
>>> You are looking for the wrong thing - look for 'sliding mitre saw'.
>>>
>>>>
>>>>> I remain delighted with it and it cuts much better (much more
>>>>> rigid) than either of my two none sliders.
>>>>
>>>> Ok thanks. I've just had a quick look on Argos's site and can't see
>>>> it now? Was it an end of line do you know?
>>>
>>> Not when I bought it, though I suspect their stock will vary quite
>>> quickly.
>>
>> Got it -
>>
>> http://www.argos.co.uk/static/Product/catalogId/1500002201/partNumber/7113079.htm
>
>
> Yes, I've got one of those and, as I have said on earlier occasions,
> I'm very impressed with build quality and precision. I would
> certainly recommend it. You could pay several times the price for an
> equivalent 'famous brand' model. I've screwed mine to a board with a
> batten underneath - so that it can easily be clamped in my B&D
> Workmate.

I have an almost new folding SCMS stand that I don't have a use for - and
its clogging up the workshop
http://www.axminster.co.uk/product-Axminster-Folding-Stand-with-Work-Supports-366137.htm

If its any good to anyone, a bottle of scotch would secure it. Have to sort
out delivery somehow.

The Medway Handyman

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 5:44:53 PM4/18/10
to

Have you been drinking Scho again? :-)

Dave

unread,
Apr 18, 2010, 7:06:53 PM4/18/10
to

No, we have had the g daughters up for the last two weeks and I have
spent the last 36 hours tidying up after them :-(((

I'm looking forward to a lie in in the morning, without having to listen
to what the youngest is up to, she gets up very early and I have to be
semi awake to hear what she is doing. She is very good and watches TV
until someone gets up.

Dave

JTM

unread,
Apr 19, 2010, 5:40:24 AM4/19/10
to
In article <4JmdnZcIGc8TDVbW...@bt.com>, Dave

<dave...@btopenworld.com> wrote:
> No, we have had the g daughters up for the last two weeks
> and I have spent the last 36 hours tidying up after them
> :-(((
Know that feeling well. Just returned 3 g/kids.
Last summer we had 4 of our own g kids + my sister and her 4
g kids.- allat the same time for three weeks. Lovely. ;-(

> I'm looking forward to a lie in in the morning, without
> having to listen to what the youngest is up to, she gets
> up very early and I have to be semi awake to hear what
> she is doing. She is very good and watches TV until
> someone gets up.

ours has just done the same, watch tv or gone back to her
room until we got up. At home though it's straight into
parent's room to wake them up

John

--
John Mulrooney
NOTE Email address IS correct but might not be checked for a while.

It doesn't matter who you vote for, the politicians will still get in

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