Looking for lightweight (breathable) foot protection

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tin...@isbd.co.uk

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Jul 31, 2008, 8:46:16 AM7/31/08
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I wear sandals just about all of the time, at work, shopping, walking,
working, etc. This includes the winter. I just find them more
comfortable and my feet are healthy.

However there are times when I need some foot protection, e.g. using
a strimmer or brush cutter, tree felling, etc. I have a pair of boots
I acquired when I worked in the oil industry and usually use them but
they have some disadvantages:-

They take a while to put on, need socks and laces to be done up,
thus I don't always use them when I should.

They're hot, especially at the moment.

They will eventually wear out.

So I'm looking for alternatives, my main criteria are:-

Easy/quick to put on, e.g. a side zipper or maybe velcro fastening.

It would be good if they were lined so don't need socks, less hassle.

Some sort of breathable material so my feet don't get too hot.

They don't *have* to be serious protection against droppping heavy
weights on my feet, i.e. steel toecaps are not necessary. That's not
what happens with a strimmer or brush cutter.


Any ideas or suggestions?

--
Chris Green

Andy Dingley

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Jul 31, 2008, 8:58:07 AM7/31/08
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On 31 Jul, 13:46, tinn...@isbd.co.uk wrote:

> However there are times when I need some foot protection, e.g. using
> a strimmer or brush cutter, tree felling, etc.  I have a pair of boots

Yanks in Vietnam discovered the need for a new sort of boot - Big
cleated sole for mud, canvas sides rather than leather, with drainage
holes, and an anti-spike plate in the sole. You can get these through
mil-surplus or eBay. They're lighter and cooler than ammo boots, have
good soles for gardening and have a reasonable level of impact
resistance. You could always add zip-lacing if you wanted quicker
access (a pair of zips with lace holes in, that you lace permanently
onto the boots - you can convert your best combats into Damart
Grannywarmers).

Bob Hobden

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Jul 31, 2008, 9:10:13 AM7/31/08
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<tin...@isbd.co.uk> wrote
Some builders type "trainers" would fit the bill. They should have steel
toecaps and a steel midsole too (for spreading the load when digging).
You do need steel toecaps if you use a brush cutter or even a mower of any
description, "mower foot" is a well known medical condition (as they try to
put it all back together!). The RHS at Wisley supply all their mower folk
with such footwear and none of them have any material left on the toecaps!
I use some DeWalt ones which cost about £60 but they are lace ups.

--
Regards
Bob Hobden


Ed

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Jul 31, 2008, 12:23:01 PM7/31/08
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You tried local camping/outdoor shop? Surely they have something suitable?

Ed

Franko

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Jul 31, 2008, 12:33:16 PM7/31/08
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<tin...@isbd.co.uk> wrote in message
news:4891b418$0$620$bed6...@news.gradwell.net...


Crocs maybe ?


The Medway Handyman

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Jul 31, 2008, 1:12:50 PM7/31/08
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tin...@isbd.co.uk wrote:
> I wear sandals just about all of the time, at work, shopping, walking,
> working, etc. This includes the winter. I just find them more
> comfortable and my feet are healthy.
>
> However there are times when I need some foot protection, e.g. using
> a strimmer or brush cutter, tree felling, etc. I have a pair of boots
> I acquired when I worked in the oil industry and usually use them but
> they have some disadvantages:-
>
> They take a while to put on, need socks and laces to be done up,
> thus I don't always use them when I should.
>
> They're hot, especially at the moment.
>
> They will eventually wear out.
>
> So I'm looking for alternatives, my main criteria are:-


I've recently been using these
https://www.screwfix.com/prods/35987/Workwear/Footwear/Dickies-Safety-Trainers/Dickies-Storm-Trainer-Anti-Static-Sole-Size-9

> Easy/quick to put on, e.g. a side zipper or maybe velcro fastening.

Fairly easy, you only have to do up/undo the lace at the top, not all the
way down.


>
> It would be good if they were lined so don't need socks, less
> hassle.
>
> Some sort of breathable material so my feet don't get too hot.

Not too bad, better than boots in the hot weather.


>
> They don't *have* to be serious protection against droppping heavy
> weights on my feet, i.e. steel toecaps are not necessary. That's not
> what happens with a strimmer or brush cutter.

No, but a strimmer could do serious damage to toes I expect.


--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk


Derek

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Jul 31, 2008, 2:27:55 PM7/31/08
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<tin...@isbd.co.uk> wrote in message
news:4891b418$0$620$bed6...@news.gradwell.net...
sounds like pull on Riggers boots but thats if you can be comfy in them
probably best with socks or if you are using lighter weight cutters Dealer
boots the elastic sided boots beloved by farmers about £25 at farmers
auctions (Chelford) or fleabay. If you are using metal bladed cutters then
ask at a Farm Shop they do sell proper heavy duty boots for the purpose
better to be safe than in A&E
Derek


tin...@isbd.co.uk

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Jul 31, 2008, 3:18:06 PM7/31/08
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What "local camping/outdoor shop", I don't think there are any worth
knowing about within miles (South Suffolk).

--
Chris Green

tin...@isbd.co.uk

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Jul 31, 2008, 3:22:27 PM7/31/08
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Riggers boots sound a possibility and they're pretty cheap so not too
much to spend to find out.

Thanks for all the other ideas too.

--
Chris Green

newshound

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Jul 31, 2008, 6:19:03 PM7/31/08
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>>
> Riggers boots sound a possibility and they're pretty cheap so not too
> much to spend to find out.
>
> Thanks for all the other ideas too.
>
> --
> Chris Green

I carry rigger boots in the car, mainly use them for taking the horses in
and out of muddy fields. They are quite heavy and although they are cheaper
on the web do try before you buy, because some have more supple leather than
others (even in the shop). Farm supply shops like Countrywide stock them
They soften up well if treated with lots of traditional dubbin. They pull
off if you get stuck in mud, I think this is a design feature for
construction sites etc if you find yourself about to be mown down by a
digger. They come in fleece lined and unlined versions but the lining isn't
particularly durable and you probably want thick socks (eg cotton sports
socks).


Gordon H

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Aug 1, 2008, 5:26:00 AM8/1/08
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In message <4891b418$0$620$bed6...@news.gradwell.net>,
tin...@isbd.co.uk writes

>I wear sandals just about all of the time, at work, shopping, walking,
>working, etc. This includes the winter. I just find them more
>comfortable and my feet are healthy.
>
>However there are times when I need some foot protection, e.g. using
>a strimmer or brush cutter, tree felling, etc. I have a pair of boots
>I acquired when I worked in the oil industry and usually use them but
>they have some disadvantages:-
>
>So I'm looking for alternatives, my main criteria are:-
> Easy/quick to put on, e.g. a side zipper or maybe velcro fastening.
> It would be good if they were lined so don't need socks, less hassle.
> Some sort of breathable material so my feet don't get too hot.
>
>They don't *have* to be serious protection against droppping heavy
>weights on my feet, i.e. steel toecaps are not necessary. That's not
>what happens with a strimmer or brush cutter.
>
>
>Any ideas or suggestions?
>
Clogs.
I bought some plastic ones from ALDI to slip on my feet when I check the
garden in the morning when the grass is wet, and slip 'em off as soon as
I step indoors.

Wooden ones offer better protection. When using a strimmer I always
wear goggles.
--
Gordon H

tin...@isbd.co.uk

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Aug 1, 2008, 9:37:07 AM8/1/08
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newshound <news...@fairadsl.co.uk> wrote:
>
> >>
> > Riggers boots sound a possibility and they're pretty cheap so not too
> > much to spend to find out.
> >
> > Thanks for all the other ideas too.
> >
>
> I carry rigger boots in the car, mainly use them for taking the horses in
> and out of muddy fields. They are quite heavy and although they are cheaper
> on the web do try before you buy, because some have more supple leather than
> others (even in the shop). Farm supply shops like Countrywide stock them
> They soften up well if treated with lots of traditional dubbin. They pull
> off if you get stuck in mud, I think this is a design feature for
> construction sites etc if you find yourself about to be mown down by a
> digger. They come in fleece lined and unlined versions but the lining isn't
> particularly durable and you probably want thick socks (eg cotton sports
> socks).
>
Thanks for the info., we have horses too but that's not what I wanted
the boots for, our soil is sandy so mud just doesn't happen.

--
Chris Green

tin...@isbd.co.uk

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Aug 1, 2008, 9:38:05 AM8/1/08
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What, on your feet? :-) Quite agree though, I wear my safety glasses.

--
Chris Green

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