Shower not hot enough

138 views
Skip to first unread message

meow...@care2.com

unread,
Jul 6, 2006, 5:23:38 PM7/6/06
to
Hi


I have an electric shower, and its alright in summer, but orrible come
winter. I thought I could maybe fix it now for when cold weather comes
around.

The metal pipe outlet on the unit is in 2 halves, with a plastic joint
between them. So I had a clever idea. Can I keep the earth connection
to the outer one, and connect the inner one to live? This should make
it run better.

I'd have to wire over the rcd of course, but thats ok, it works fine
like that. The 2.5mm wire only gets hot after about 20 mins, and I wont
ever be in there more than 10 minutes, so I figure I could double the
power rating and still be ok. Any comments?


NT :)

Graham.

unread,
Jul 6, 2006, 5:50:25 PM7/6/06
to

<meow...@care2.com> wrote in message
news:1152221018.4...@s53g2000cws.googlegroups.com...

LOL
Should be OK but make sure you wear rubber wellies whilst showering.

Graham.


Ron Lowe

unread,
Jul 6, 2006, 6:04:40 PM7/6/06
to
<meow...@care2.com> wrote in message
news:1152221018.4...@s53g2000cws.googlegroups.com...

You can probably reduce the temperature on the 2.5mm wire by hooking the
incoming L, N, and E cores together in parallell as a combined 3 * 2.5 Live
( at both the shower and CU) and then on the shower unit hooking the N to
the pipework as a combined Neutral /Earth.

If it's plastic pipe, the N leg won't actually connect till the water is
flowing, so there may be a 'lag' before the water gets hot, but the tingling
sensation should compensate.

--
Ron

Owain

unread,
Jul 6, 2006, 5:59:51 PM7/6/06
to
meow...@care2.com wrote:
> I have an electric shower, and its alright in summer, but orrible come
> winter. I thought I could maybe fix it now for when cold weather comes
> around.
> The metal pipe outlet on the unit is in 2 halves, with a plastic joint
> between them. So I had a clever idea. Can I keep the earth connection
> to the outer one, and connect the inner one to live? This should make
> I'd have to wire over the rcd of course, but thats ok, it works fine
> like that. The 2.5mm wire only gets hot after about 20 mins, and I wont
> ever be in there more than 10 minutes, so I figure I could double the
> power rating and still be ok. Any comments?

Yeah, wire it between live and *neutral* ya numpty, not earth, then you
won't get RCD trip.

Better still, pop over to Germany and get a 3-phase one. "Du kann es
macht, wann du es BundQ't"; "Fusenblowenduschepoppen durch Technik" and
all those other pearls of wisdom apply.

Owain

Ron Lowe

unread,
Jul 6, 2006, 6:25:08 PM7/6/06
to
>> I'd have to wire over the rcd of course, but thats ok, it works fine
>> like that. The 2.5mm wire only gets hot after about 20 mins, and I wont
>> ever be in there more than 10 minutes, so I figure I could double the
>> power rating and still be ok. Any comments?
>>
>>
>> NT :)
>>
>
> You can probably reduce the temperature on the 2.5mm wire by hooking the
> incoming L, N, and E cores together in parallell as a combined 3 * 2.5
> Live ( at both the shower and CU) and then on the shower unit hooking the
> N to the pipework as a combined Neutral /Earth.
>
> If it's plastic pipe, the N leg won't actually connect till the water is
> flowing, so there may be a 'lag' before the water gets hot, but the
> tingling sensation should compensate.
>
> --
> Ron
>


Oh, I forgot to mention...

If the 'Significant Other' complains ( after getting out of the Burns Unit
at the local hospital ); then there's a modification to the '3-cores-Live,
Pipework-Neutral' configuration to reduce the tingling.

'Float' the entire bathroom electrically.

Place rubber pads under the feet of the bath, and insert short sections if
plastic pipework in the bath / basin / bog supplies.

Then, the entire metalwork in the bathroom floats to 240v, so no potential
difference -> no tingles.

You might consider some tastefull blue LED lighting betwen the floating live
of the bath and true earth. This would 'modulate' nicely as the user
showers in blissfull ignorange. Perhaps it could be calibrated as a
'cleanliness' indicator, according to water conductivity and dirt content.

--
Ron

Frank Erskine

unread,
Jul 6, 2006, 6:48:37 PM7/6/06
to
On 6 Jul 2006 14:23:38 -0700, meow...@care2.com had this to say:

If you run the 2.5mm wires _through_ the incoming cold water pipe
you'd keep them nice and cool. You might have to use a bit bigger pipe
so that you get enough water through though, especially if you leave
the sheath on the wires. It's a good idea to use 2.5mm wires, because
you'll save a lot on energy bills (and the wire is cheap).

For the bits of wire that can't go by pipe, just cover them in a bit
of cloth which you can keep damp with a watering can. Just remember to
use a plastic watering can rather than a galvanised tin one.

--
Frank Erskine
Sunderland

meow...@care2.com

unread,
Jul 6, 2006, 8:11:23 PM7/6/06
to
Frank Erskine wrote:
> On 6 Jul 2006 14:23:38 -0700, meow...@care2.com had this to say:

> >I have an electric shower, and its alright in summer, but orrible come


Some seriously smart ideas in this thread.


NT

meow...@care2.com

unread,
Jul 6, 2006, 8:14:06 PM7/6/06
to

OK, heres what I plan to do. I realised the missus might take a bt
longer now and then, so I need to uprate the cable. 3x2.5 live is an
excellant move, and I'm looking at using the water pipe as a combined
N/E conductor. This has been done in US since WW2, and doesnt seem to
be causing safety problems, so ok. Only question is, how do I deal with
the water in the CU?


NT

meow...@care2.com

unread,
Jul 6, 2006, 8:14:08 PM7/6/06
to

OK, heres what I plan to do. I realised the missus might take a bt

Phil Anthropist

unread,
Jul 7, 2006, 4:30:30 AM7/7/06
to

Some shocking replies. All I can add is to make sure you strip all the
insulation off the cables as any insulation will keep the heat in.


Ron Lowe

unread,
Jul 7, 2006, 4:46:08 AM7/7/06
to
> Only question is, how do I deal with
> the water in the CU?
>
>
> NT


If the flow is more than can be accomodated by simply drilling a small hole
in the underside of the CU, then you'll need to fit an overflow.

Most CUs have 20mm punch-outs for fitting overflows to, and overflow pipe is
cheap.
Here's some from screwfix:

http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/cat.jsp?cId=A331821&ts=61694

If you want to fit an exteror light, this would be a goot time.
You can run the wire through the overflow to outside.

--
Ron

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages