OT: Hand-held Blenders

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Chris J Dixon

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Nov 17, 2008, 12:20:51 PM11/17/08
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Off-topic, but I know you all like to talk equipment ;-)

Currently I liquidise large pans of soup by ladling it in batches
into the liquidiser attachment on my Kenwood Chef. It does an
excellent job, but the process is a bit messy and time-consuming.

I am contemplating getting a hand blender for this task, so that
I can simply process it whilst still in the saucepan, and
wondered what experience others have had.

I have a feeling that many of these appliances are only
intermittently rated, say 1 minute out of three, for instance,
which would not really be suitable.

Which best buys are:

Braun MR4050 HC £29.00
Kenwood HB615 Wizzard Pro £25.00
Kenwood HB150 £13.00

But looking on Amazon you can get plenty which are very much more
expensive than any of those tested. At what point would more
money buy something gutsy enough for my intended use?

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
ch...@cdixon.me.uk

Have dancing shoes, will ceilidh.

NOSP...@gmail.com

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Nov 17, 2008, 12:30:26 PM11/17/08
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On Mon, 17 Nov 2008 17:20:51 GMT, Chris J Dixon <ch...@cdixon.me.uk>
wrote:

I have a Braun and use it for the very purpose you mention and have
had no problem with it .It does that job admirably and saves several
filling of the liquidiser. I can't remember which model it is but it
has the small jug,large jug,whisk and the 3 different bladed parts .
It's multi-speed with Turbo setting . It was a lot more than £29
tho'.I got it in Argos.

Adrian C

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Nov 17, 2008, 12:37:26 PM11/17/08
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Chris J Dixon wrote:
> Off-topic, but I know you all like to talk equipment ;-)
>
> Currently I liquidise large pans of soup by ladling it in batches
> into the liquidiser attachment on my Kenwood Chef. It does an
> excellent job, but the process is a bit messy and time-consuming.
>
> I am contemplating getting a hand blender for this task, so that
> I can simply process it whilst still in the saucepan, and
> wondered what experience others have had.
>

Don't forget the obvious!

<http://www2.northerntool.com/power-tools/grinders-stands/item-1591733.htm>

A quote there from a satisfied user ...

"I have used mine for years and ground everything from soup to nuts I
think it will out last me , thats ok I'll hand it down to someone who
likes to work"

--
Adrian C

Lino expert

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Nov 17, 2008, 12:40:05 PM11/17/08
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+1 for a Braun, mine's a Vario, I've had it for a few years now so the
name may have been superceded, but it's an extremely nifty bit of kit
- easy to up the speed while you're holding it, good blades, nice
extras with the jugs (ooh err) and all that malarky.

Gordon Henderson

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Nov 17, 2008, 12:41:44 PM11/17/08
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In article <1h93i41kqfff5vgot...@4ax.com>,

Chris J Dixon <ch...@cdixon.me.uk> wrote:

We got a Bamix a couple of years back. Maybe 3.

http://www.bamix-blender.co.uk/

I don't think we got it from there, but that's sort of what we have -
the blender, 3 blades and a grinder and a stand. The "Gastro 200" is
probably the closest to what we have.

We've given it a lot of abuse - mostly grinding ice to make
slush/smoothies. The flat blade makes a really smooth milk shake though!
(Ice, crushed + cream, blended + flavour = instant ice cream/really thick
"shake"... crude but effective!)

Much more expensive that the ones you're looking at though!

Ours came with 4 beakers too, although I can't remember if we bought them
separately - 2 plain ones and 2 with pouring spouts. Ah, they're on the
accessories page:

http://www.bamix-blender.co.uk/accessories-9-c.asp

it's the wet and dry mill we have - although I have to say, I've only
ever used it once more out of curiosity than anything else!

Just checked the model - it's a 200W model and rated for 5 minutes
constant use. I know I've given it plenty of abuse for what seemed long
periods of time and it's never felt hot...

FWIW: I used to have one of the older Braun ones, and it was fine for
soup, but I've never consider blitzing ice with it!

Of-course, there's always a Blendtec...

http://www.willitblend.com/

(yes, it probably will!)

Gordon

Rod

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Nov 17, 2008, 12:56:21 PM11/17/08
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I absolutely 100% agree - much better idea. I used to avoid whizzing
soups in a liquidiser because it tends to be messy and tedious and ends
up with more washing up! And dangerous - setting it off with a litre of
very hot soup and a lid not quite down isn't a good idea.

I've always felt, perhaps unfairly, that liquidised soups can end up a
bit homogenised - and prefer to stop slightly early with the stick
blender - while there is a little texture left.

At the time, I was absolutely 'off' Kenwood as they had let me down over
something or other - ended up with a Braun Type 4193 (400W). Think that
might be the MR4000 here:

<http://www.amazon.co.uk/Braun-MR4000-Hand-Blender/dp/B00008J20O/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=kitchen&qid=1226943396&sr=8-3>


Adequate - but nothing special. We make fairly thick soups as a rule and
it copes. I have been finding it seems to cut out intermittently at high
speed. :-( Our previous Braun was in some ways better. Never knowingly
had a problem with limited usage time - it doesn't really take very long
in the sort of quantities we process - maybe at most 2/3 litres or so at
a time.

I wondered about this one:

<http://www.nisbets.co.uk/products/productdetail.asp?productCode=J772&BrandGroupCode=&BrandGroupName=&ShopByBrand=>

(and there are many more, at much higher prices, if you click on 'stick
blenders' towards the top of that page).

One thing - I would *always* choose one where the whizzy bit separates
from the motor bit. Makes washing it much easier, even finding somewhere
to put it down for a few minutes is easier. I know the Warings one
doesn't... :-) But it is more of a beast to look at although a lower
wattage. Variable speed would also be quite nice but we manage with two
speeds.

What would make these far, far better would be a good LiIon power pack
to make them cordless. Any chance of a Makita stick blender sometime soon?

--
Rod

Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
onset.
Although common it frequently goes undiagnosed.
<www.thyromind.info> <www.thyroiduk.org> <www.altsupportthyroid.org>

Bob Eager

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Nov 17, 2008, 1:18:24 PM11/17/08
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On Mon, 17 Nov 2008 17:20:51 UTC, Chris J Dixon <ch...@cdixon.me.uk>
wrote:

> But looking on Amazon you can get plenty which are very much more


> expensive than any of those tested. At what point would more
> money buy something gutsy enough for my intended use?

Or DIY it using a V8 engine...

(see last night's Top Gear!)

--
The information contained in this post is copyright the
poster, and specifically may not be published in, or used by
http://www.diybanter.com

Dave Liquorice

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Nov 17, 2008, 2:27:37 PM11/17/08
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On Mon, 17 Nov 2008 09:40:05 -0800 (PST), Lino expert wrote:

> +1 for a Braun, mine's a Vario, I've had it for a few years now so the
> name may have been superceded,

Same here Braun Vario 300W type 418 (possibly 4189 the 9 is separated from
and in different font to the 418 so might be part of date code or serial
number that is next to it).

Variable speed is very useful, low speed for making milk shakes, top speed
for soups. For ease of washing I'd say a detachable head is essential.

--
Cheers
Dave.

Toby

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Nov 17, 2008, 3:54:43 PM11/17/08
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Another vote for the Bamix, I have the mill thing too, and have used it one,
to try it, it now been downgraded to living in one of the high cupboards!

We also make large batches of soup (and freeze it)

Had the Bamix for abut 3 years too, hasn't missed a beat!

Toby...

meow...@care2.com

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Nov 17, 2008, 4:17:13 PM11/17/08
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FWIW I've used a few different wand blenders, makes varying from posh
to argos cookworks, and I've really not noticed any difference between
them. Removable blades sound like a good idea, but one doesnt have
that and I've not found it to make any difference, it cleans so easily
under the tap.

All of them gradually overheat and take a very long time to cool down.
So maybe a good option for you would be 3x cookworks handheld
blenders. These things are good as long as you're ok with some
remaining texture - not so good when you want puree.

Oh, dont overlook blade sharpening, its necessary to avoid slowdown of
work.


NT

Mike Barnes

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Nov 17, 2008, 2:40:21 PM11/17/08
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You'll be pleased by what you can achieve in one minute.

We have a Bamix which is the Rolls-Royce brand and is priced
accordingly. The comprehensive instructions make no mention of duty
cycles and they recommend that you oil it every now and then, which I
take as a sign of a good attitude! Ours has never shown the slightest
sign of distress despite intensive use, and I'm reassured by the ten-
year guarantee.

--
Mike Barnes

Peter Parry

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Nov 17, 2008, 6:01:22 PM11/17/08
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On Mon, 17 Nov 2008 17:20:51 GMT, Chris J Dixon <ch...@cdixon.me.uk>
wrote:

>I have a feeling that many of these appliances are only


>intermittently rated, say 1 minute out of three, for instance,
>which would not really be suitable.

I've had a Bamix one for about 20 years and it has survived regular
use. Soup is usually made in 5 gallon lots when there is a glut of
appropriate ingredients and it will happily turn a few hundred
tomatoes into soup in a few minutes. It's also more than paid for
itself making mayonnaise.

I had a Braun (no idea which model) at one stage but it wasn't
anywhere near as fast or effective.

ajp

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Nov 18, 2008, 8:59:13 AM11/18/08
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Chris J Dixon wrote:

Bought a Kenwood HB665 in August - seemed Ok but now the gearing mechanism
for the chopper unit is making an awful racket - I suspect damaged gears.

We have an old Braun model which has now gone out to Crete which has given
stirling service for years.

Oh, and the end of the blender unit on the Kenwood is metal so it can't be
used in non-stick pans.

Alan
--
email =~ s/nospam/fudokai/

NOSP...@gmail.com

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Nov 18, 2008, 12:05:21 PM11/18/08
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On Mon, 17 Nov 2008 09:40:05 -0800 (PST), Lino expert
<rumtr...@tesco.net> wrote:

I had a Vario 300W/ 5 Speed but the part I used the most ....the long
part with the blade at the end ( like a Flymo) packed in so I bought a
newer Model .I still have the old one( well the motor part ) but it
seems from the Braun site that you can get every other attachment but
that part that died .

You can have it free if you want it :-)

Phil Addison

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Nov 19, 2008, 7:15:56 PM11/19/08
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Got the Kenwood HB615 Wizzard Pro couple of weeks ago from Comet (best
price I could find and you can reserve it online and pickup there).
Previuosly only iused the KW liquidiser before and was amazed to find
the stick design is MUCH better. The blade is kind of propeller shapped
and partially enclosed so it acts as a powerful pump that sucks stuff
into it from the bottom, blends it and shoots it out holes in the sie of
the enclosure. Its so powerful that if you switch it on in a beaker full
of water you can actually lift the beaker by lifting the stick. ie it
sucks itself to the beaker. Of course in use you hold the beaker down
and plunge the stick up and down. The downside for your application is
the 700ml capacity of the beaker, though you could use it in a bigger
pan, but I think efficiency is max in a narrow beaker.

It comes with a second chopper attachment in a more squat tub and that
is very effective at grinding 300 grams of supermarket mince into
smaller bits for bolagnaise sauce. It does that in about 30 secs.

Compared to this the KW liquidiser just whirls in the base and the
blades throwing the heavier bits upwards where they remain. I doubt I'll
use it again now we have the stick blender.

Phil

Chris J Dixon

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Nov 21, 2008, 3:00:26 AM11/21/08
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Mike Barnes wrote:

>You'll be pleased by what you can achieve in one minute.

;-)

>We have a Bamix which is the Rolls-Royce brand and is priced
>accordingly. The comprehensive instructions make no mention of duty
>cycles and they recommend that you oil it every now and then, which I
>take as a sign of a good attitude! Ours has never shown the slightest
>sign of distress despite intensive use, and I'm reassured by the ten-
>year guarantee.

Thanks to all for the suggestions. I have to say that Bamix was
the first name to come to mind - I remember seeing them
demonstrated when I was a lad, back when Lewis's existed in
Leeds.

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