Shooting Board

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Arthur 51

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Jul 17, 2007, 10:32:10 AM7/17/07
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hi all.
I've found a web site that helped me understand what a shooting board
is.
But my hand planing is dire.
Anyone ever used one with an electric planer?

Arthur

Andy Cap

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Jul 17, 2007, 10:48:20 AM7/17/07
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Surely the whole point of a shooting board is that it guides the plane. so
skill's not really an issue. Trimming the back edge does stop splitting however.

Using an electric plane on it's side with the blades exposed would be extremely
dangerous IMO.

Andy

NoSpam

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Jul 17, 2007, 11:17:25 AM7/17/07
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Many years ago I made a shooting board for my electric plane. I used
some old kitchen worktop to get flat siding faces and made a 90 degree
mount for the plane. It worked well but finger care is needed.

D

John Rumm

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Jul 17, 2007, 11:20:05 AM7/17/07
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Arthur 51 wrote:

The electric version looks more like:

http://www.axminster.co.uk/recno/2/product-Axminster-WP150-150mm-Planer-21722.htm

or

http://www.axminster.co.uk/recno/1/product-Axminster-CT1502-150mm-Planer-370404.htm

;-)

(having said that, if you by PAR prepared boards, then it ought to be
square and flat enough for edge jointing anyway)

--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\=================================================================/

Brian G

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Jul 18, 2007, 11:14:38 AM7/18/07
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John Rumm wrote:
> Arthur 51 wrote:
>
>> I've found a web site that helped me understand what a shooting board
>> is.
>> But my hand planing is dire.
>> Anyone ever used one with an electric planer?
>
> The electric version looks more like:
>
> http://www.axminster.co.uk/recno/2/product-Axminster-WP150-150mm-Planer-21722.htm
>
> or
>
> http://www.axminster.co.uk/recno/1/product-Axminster-CT1502-150mm-Planer-370404.htm
>
> ;-)
>
> (having said that, if you by PAR prepared boards, then it ought to be
> square and flat enough for edge jointing anyway)
>
>
> /=================================================================\
>> Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
>> -----------------------------------------------------------------|
>> John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
> \=================================================================/

John,

"(having said that, if you by PAR prepared boards, then it ought to be
square and flat enough for edge jointing anyway)"

That little sentence must have my old apprentice master 'spinning in his
grave' and I won't repeat his reply and actions when, as a first year
apprentice, I asked him "why can't you this f***ing job on the planer" -
after spending nearly a week 'shooting' and jointing boards on his
instructions (ouch was my only reply). :-)

BTW, for the less experienced in this group, the terms *Shooting a board*
and *Shooting Board* have different meanings and purposes:

=====================================
Shooting a board:

The whole point of 'shooting' boards ready for edge gluing is to remove the
marks left by machining and straighten the joint to get as close a fit as
possible, apply the glue to the edges and then 'rub' the boards together to
spread the glue very thinly and then cramp (not clamp) the boards together.

This would be done with the board fixed in a vice (or other devices to hold
a long board) and using a jointing plane with a very sharp blade on a 'fine'
cut - and when done correctly, this produces an amazingly close and strong
joint.

=====================================

The use of a SHOOTING board:

The 'shooting' board is primarily used for accurately squaring and cleaning
up the end grain of timber or cleaning and adjusting mitres (standard or
compound) - it would not generally be used when jointing two 'long' boards
ready for gluing.

These are my last words now on stairs and 'shooting'


Brian G


John Rumm

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Jul 18, 2007, 12:48:16 PM7/18/07
to
Brian G wrote:

> "(having said that, if you by PAR prepared boards, then it ought to be
> square and flat enough for edge jointing anyway)"
>
> That little sentence must have my old apprentice master 'spinning in his
> grave' and I won't repeat his reply and actions when, as a first year
> apprentice, I asked him "why can't you this f***ing job on the planer" -
> after spending nearly a week 'shooting' and jointing boards on his
> instructions (ouch was my only reply). :-)

While I don't argue with the concept that a machine planed board will
have some ripple on the surface (which is often easy enough to see[1])
and hence offer a less perfect gluing surface, it would be interesting
to see exactly how much difference in bond strength you get when
compared to a manually finished flat edge joint. With modern adhesives
its seems quite common for the glue line to out perform the material
anyway.

[1] Having said that my thicknesser (which runs its cutter block at 20k
cuts / min) does leave a surface so flat that I can't actually see any
ripple in it.

> These are my last words now on stairs and 'shooting'

Last time I wanted to use stairs and shooting in the same sentence was
when I realised my architect could not count, and had specified 12 steps
(and set rise and going appropriately), but drawn 13!

--
Cheers,

John.

d...@gglz.com

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Jul 18, 2007, 4:26:59 PM7/18/07
to

> But my hand planing is dire.

Pay a lot of attention to sharpening and adjusting the plane - you
can't beat having somebody show you how. Buy an old Stanley No:4, the
steel in the modern ones doesn't measure up. Practice lots.

> Anyone ever used one with an electric planer?

They can probably be counted on half their fingers.

A power plane is a crude tool by comparison, more useful for taking
out the donkey work before finishing with a hand plane.

In their place, they're phenomenally useful - but that place is not
accurately trueing up a board.

Peter Ashby

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Jul 19, 2007, 3:06:19 PM7/19/07
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John Rumm <see.my.s...@nowhere.null> wrote:

> Brian G wrote:
>
> > "(having said that, if you by PAR prepared boards, then it ought to be
> > square and flat enough for edge jointing anyway)"
> >
> > That little sentence must have my old apprentice master 'spinning in his
> > grave' and I won't repeat his reply and actions when, as a first year
> > apprentice, I asked him "why can't you this f***ing job on the planer" -
> > after spending nearly a week 'shooting' and jointing boards on his
> > instructions (ouch was my only reply). :-)
>
> While I don't argue with the concept that a machine planed board will
> have some ripple on the surface (which is often easy enough to see[1])
> and hence offer a less perfect gluing surface, it would be interesting
> to see exactly how much difference in bond strength you get when
> compared to a manually finished flat edge joint. With modern adhesives
> its seems quite common for the glue line to out perform the material
> anyway.

If you don't care about being able to see the joint then sure slop on
some poly glue it'll probably hold. If you are filling gaps then you are
sure to see the joint. If there are no gaps (apart from a thin shaving
off the middle of course) then you won't see the joint. If you are going
to paint it then you may as well use mdf, ply or pine board.

Peter
--
Add my middle initial to email me. It has become attached to a country
www.the-brights.net

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