Cutting a tile in situ

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David WE Roberts

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Oct 10, 2009, 1:39:55 PM10/10/09
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Hi,

I am replacing a shower tray.

The old one had sloping sides the new one (plus platform) will have vertical
sides.
As the tray was let in to the tiles I need to straighten up the sloping cut
on one of the tiles to make it vertical.
I would prefer just to cut it in situ but this seems to have a potential for
ending in tears.

I don't have any spare tiles - I could just hack the tile off and use a
white replacement but would prefer to keep the existing tile if possible.

So - score gently with an angle grinder (hah!) then cold chisel off?

Prise off the wall intact (hah!) cut and refit?

I really need a way to 'nibble' a tile edge whilst it is fixed to the wall.

Has anyone found a good way to do this, or am I just likely to waste a load
of time bugggering about and then end up replacing the tile anyway?

Cheers

Dave R

John Rumm

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Oct 10, 2009, 2:07:17 PM10/10/09
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David WE Roberts wrote:

> Has anyone found a good way to do this, or am I just likely to waste a
> load of time bugggering about and then end up replacing the tile anyway?

Dead easy with a multimaster (or clone) and a carbide segment saw. I
have even cut rectangular sections out of the middle of a tile for a
shaver socket using one of these.

Just plunge cut in, and extend to whatever extent you need:

http://www.internode.co.uk/temp/carbide-ss-face.jpg
http://www.internode.co.uk/temp/carbide-ss-side.jpg


--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\=================================================================/

NT

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Oct 10, 2009, 5:09:09 PM10/10/09
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die grinder or angle grinder with continuous rim disc, but I'd cut
through as far as poss, chiselling is asking for it.


NT

Arthur 51

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Oct 10, 2009, 6:45:36 PM10/10/09
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"David WE Roberts" <nos...@talk21.com> wrote in message
news:7jbv74F...@mid.individual.net...

You could use an ordinary ceramic tile drill to drill holes in a vertical
line to within a couple of milimetres.
Then use the same drill to mill the rough edge smooth.
Cheaply done if you have a steady hand.

Arthur


gazz

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Oct 10, 2009, 8:57:58 PM10/10/09
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"John Rumm" <see.my.s...@nowhere.null> wrote in message
news:to2dneq6q9PLUE3X...@brightview.co.uk...

> David WE Roberts wrote:
>
>> Has anyone found a good way to do this, or am I just likely to waste a
>> load of time bugggering about and then end up replacing the tile anyway?
>
> Dead easy with a multimaster (or clone) and a carbide segment saw. I have
> even cut rectangular sections out of the middle of a tile for a shaver
> socket using one of these.

Is there anything a multimaster can't do?

your gonna tell me it would have stripped the woodchip wallpaper off the
front bedroom... even the bits covered in gloss paint in seconds rather than
the hours it took me with a scraper, window scraper razor knifey thing,
hammer, chisel, sds drill etc,

i even tried to get my pet rats to have a go at it, they've done a good job
stripping the paint off the downstairs bedroom walls, i painted too soon
over fresh plaster, so once the paint layer is peirced, it comes off in
chunks, which of course the rats love doing,

In some places i'm sure they have been standing on each others shoulders to
get their teeth under the paint, as none of them can reach up 1 and a half
feet alone,

But they took a few sniffs of the walls up there and refused to help me, why
couldent they make the woodchips smell of peanut butter, it'd have been
stripped by them in no time,

John Rumm

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Oct 10, 2009, 9:38:42 PM10/10/09
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gazz wrote:
> "John Rumm" <see.my.s...@nowhere.null> wrote in message
> news:to2dneq6q9PLUE3X...@brightview.co.uk...
>> David WE Roberts wrote:
>>
>>> Has anyone found a good way to do this, or am I just likely to waste
>>> a load of time bugggering about and then end up replacing the tile
>>> anyway?
>>
>> Dead easy with a multimaster (or clone) and a carbide segment saw. I
>> have even cut rectangular sections out of the middle of a tile for a
>> shaver socket using one of these.
>
> Is there anything a multimaster can't do?

Plenty, but it is good for mopping up a collection of jobs that are hard
to do by other means...

> your gonna tell me it would have stripped the woodchip wallpaper off the
> front bedroom... even the bits covered in gloss paint in seconds rather
> than the hours it took me with a scraper, window scraper razor knifey
> thing, hammer, chisel, sds drill etc,

Can't say I have ever tried a mm on that. A big sharp scraper with
changeable blades however seems to do the trick.

> i even tried to get my pet rats to have a go at it, they've done a good
> job stripping the paint off the downstairs bedroom walls, i painted too
> soon over fresh plaster, so once the paint layer is peirced, it comes
> off in chunks, which of course the rats love doing,
>
> In some places i'm sure they have been standing on each others shoulders
> to get their teeth under the paint, as none of them can reach up 1 and a
> half feet alone,
>
> But they took a few sniffs of the walls up there and refused to help me,
> why couldent they make the woodchips smell of peanut butter, it'd have
> been stripped by them in no time,

Filling knife and a jar of sunpat?

Stuart Noble

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Oct 11, 2009, 7:38:17 AM10/11/09
to

>> Is there anything a multimaster can't do?
>
> Plenty, but it is good for mopping up a collection of jobs that are hard
> to do by other means...
>
I wonder how many tiles the carbide blade would have cut before giving
up the ghost.

I may need to find a way to cut round the edge of a new slate hearth
which was laid on the original 1920s hearth tiles.

http://i38.tinypic.com/ev5010.jpg

Sorry about the size of the photo, but the old tiles and floorboards are
currently flush, so I could use matching timber to "extend" the floor
boards (albeit by reducing the thickness) but obviously I can't be
whacking the tiles that close to the slate. Can't help thinking it would
have been a five minute job before the hearth was laid, and is now
likely to be a sting in the tail sort of a job.

Steve Firth

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Oct 11, 2009, 9:06:39 AM10/11/09
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gazz <s...@m.con> wrote:

> Is there anything a multimaster can't do?

Not much to be honest. It's up there with the angle grinder as "much
more useful than you think when you buy one".

> your gonna tell me it would have stripped the woodchip wallpaper off the
> front bedroom... even the bits covered in gloss paint in seconds rather
> than the hours it took me with a scraper, window scraper razor knifey
> thing, hammer, chisel, sds drill etc,

Mine has been used to remove anti-foul from boats, chase in wiring, cut
tiles, chop out rot from window frames, shape filler, and shape soft
brick for arches and columns. It's been damned good at each task.

John Rumm

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Oct 11, 2009, 11:59:03 AM10/11/09
to
Stuart Noble wrote:
>
>>> Is there anything a multimaster can't do?
>>
>> Plenty, but it is good for mopping up a collection of jobs that are
>> hard to do by other means...
>>
> I wonder how many tiles the carbide blade would have cut before giving
> up the ghost.

Don't know - I am still using the one that came with the machine. Hacing
said that - I don't use it that often. Its good for tiles in situ and
raking out old grout.

> I may need to find a way to cut round the edge of a new slate hearth
> which was laid on the original 1920s hearth tiles.
>
> http://i38.tinypic.com/ev5010.jpg
>
> Sorry about the size of the photo, but the old tiles and floorboards are
> currently flush, so I could use matching timber to "extend" the floor
> boards (albeit by reducing the thickness) but obviously I can't be
> whacking the tiles that close to the slate. Can't help thinking it would

Would you need to whack them if just extending the boards over?

You could do a hardwood inlay, neatly mitred at the corners, to separate
the new tiles from the existing boards. It would save it looking like
you extended the floor boards and could not quite match them ;-)

> have been a five minute job before the hearth was laid, and is now
> likely to be a sting in the tail sort of a job.

Often the way... "better not to start from here"

Stuart Noble

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Oct 11, 2009, 12:20:15 PM10/11/09
to
John Rumm wrote:
> Stuart Noble wrote:
>>
>>>> Is there anything a multimaster can't do?
>>>
>>> Plenty, but it is good for mopping up a collection of jobs that are
>>> hard to do by other means...
>>>
>> I wonder how many tiles the carbide blade would have cut before giving
>> up the ghost.
>
> Don't know - I am still using the one that came with the machine. Hacing
> said that - I don't use it that often. Its good for tiles in situ and
> raking out old grout.
>
>> I may need to find a way to cut round the edge of a new slate hearth
>> which was laid on the original 1920s hearth tiles.
>>
>> http://i38.tinypic.com/ev5010.jpg
>>
>> Sorry about the size of the photo, but the old tiles and floorboards
>> are currently flush, so I could use matching timber to "extend" the
>> floor boards (albeit by reducing the thickness) but obviously I can't
>> be whacking the tiles that close to the slate. Can't help thinking it
>> would
>
> Would you need to whack them if just extending the boards over?

The tiles have got to go because they're flush with the top of the
boards, and I reckon I need at least 10mm depth to fill in with wood


>
> You could do a hardwood inlay, neatly mitred at the corners, to separate
> the new tiles from the existing boards. It would save it looking like
> you extended the floor boards and could not quite match them ;-)

I might end up doing a softwood inlay, which might be fun :-)

John Rumm

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Oct 11, 2009, 12:51:19 PM10/11/09
to
Stuart Noble wrote:
> John Rumm wrote:
>> Stuart Noble wrote:
>>>
>>>>> Is there anything a multimaster can't do?
>>>>
>>>> Plenty, but it is good for mopping up a collection of jobs that are
>>>> hard to do by other means...
>>>>
>>> I wonder how many tiles the carbide blade would have cut before
>>> giving up the ghost.
>>
>> Don't know - I am still using the one that came with the machine.
>> Hacing said that - I don't use it that often. Its good for tiles in
>> situ and raking out old grout.
>>
>>> I may need to find a way to cut round the edge of a new slate hearth
>>> which was laid on the original 1920s hearth tiles.
>>>
>>> http://i38.tinypic.com/ev5010.jpg
>>>
>>> Sorry about the size of the photo, but the old tiles and floorboards
>>> are currently flush, so I could use matching timber to "extend" the
>>> floor boards (albeit by reducing the thickness) but obviously I can't
>>> be whacking the tiles that close to the slate. Can't help thinking it
>>> would
>>
>> Would you need to whack them if just extending the boards over?
>
> The tiles have got to go because they're flush with the top of the
> boards, and I reckon I need at least 10mm depth to fill in with wood

Ah, ok, thought you were keeping them - my bad.

If they must come up, then rake out the grout (aforementioned carbide
blade), and clobber gently from the side to see if you can shock them loose!

>> You could do a hardwood inlay, neatly mitred at the corners, to
>> separate the new tiles from the existing boards. It would save it
>> looking like you extended the floor boards and could not quite match
>> them ;-)
>
> I might end up doing a softwood inlay, which might be fun :-)

Or design some sort of wood trim to cover the lot ;-)

Stuart Noble

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Oct 11, 2009, 2:16:14 PM10/11/09
to

Or get an adjustable fender to cover the lot, possibly with little
leatherette seats at the corners and toasting forks.

mark

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Oct 12, 2009, 4:03:46 AM10/12/09
to

"David WE Roberts" <nos...@talk21.com> wrote in message
news:7jbv74F...@mid.individual.net...

I would use some wide masking tape centred along the desired line of cut.
Mark it with a thick black marker pen along the line of cut. That's so you
can see the line when the dust is being generated . Then with a diamond
bladed angle grinder cut fully through the tiles. In the corner you will
need to push the grinder blade in quite deep so as to get the cut-line
completed.


mark


David WE Roberts

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Oct 20, 2009, 5:18:08 AM10/20/09
to

"David WE Roberts" <nos...@talk21.com> wrote in message
news:7jbv74F...@mid.individual.net...
> Hi,
>
> I am replacing a shower tray.
>
> The old one had sloping sides the new one (plus platform) will have
> vertical sides.
> As the tray was let in to the tiles I need to straighten up the sloping
> cut on one of the tiles to make it vertical.
> I would prefer just to cut it in situ but this seems to have a potential
> for ending in tears.
>
> I don't have any spare tiles - I could just hack the tile off and use a
> white replacement but would prefer to keep the existing tile if possible.
>
> So - score gently with an angle grinder (hah!) then cold chisel off?
<snip>

Don't know why I went 'hah'.

The tile was fixed on a deep bed of plaster so my small angle grinder cut a
nice straight notch up the tile and was able to sink into the plaster
underneath which allowed me to cut right up to the edge of the tile.
Because the tile was supported underneath it didn't crack.
After all the usual over thinking, plus pricing up of Dremmel tools, turned
out to be a doddle.

Thanks for all the advice.

Cheers

Dave R

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