Wiki: Replace a eurolock cylinder

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NT

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Jan 29, 2012, 3:44:27 AM1/29/12
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Based on the last one, tweaked to suit...

NT



[[image:Eurolock 2282-2.jpg|right|100px]]
[[image:Euro_cylinder_481-3.jpg|right|100px]]

Eurolocks are a modern pattern of cylinder deadlock. As well as key
operation, thumbturn cylinders are available, mainly for bathrooms.

Replacing a eurolock key cylinder is very easy, you just need to get
the right length of cylinder to suit the door thickness. The lock
cylinder can be replaced on its own, without removing the lock itself.

There are also other incompatible cylinder lock systems in use, such
as [[night latches|Replace a lock cylinder]].


==How easy==
Replacing the key cylinder is a very simple job, as long as you can
open the door. The lock itself isn't replaced.


==Why replace==
Apart from the obvious...

A new cylinder is around £5 for a basic one, or £20 for one with 6
hardened pins in 2011. So replacement is sometimes cheaper than
copying keys. New cylinders usually come with 3 keys.

When moving into a house, you've no idea who has keys. Its prudent to
replace external cylinders.

Some house insurance policies are invalid if a cylinder with
unhardened pins is used on an external door. Such policies generally
require a eurolock to meet EN....


==The new cylinder==
[[image:Eurolock measurements 3978-3.jpg|right|250px]]

The main choice with new cylinders is what length you need. The
pictured one is called either 40-10-30 or 45-35.

Then you can have brass or chrome finish, and hardened or unhardened
pins, 5 or 6 pins, and key operated or thumbturn.
* Cheaper unhardened pin cylinders are easier to drill open
* house insurance often requires 6 hardened pins
* unhardened is usually preferable for internal rooms & cupboards,
easier to remove if keys are ever lost.

Its best not to have new locks, cylinders or keys posted to you, the
seller usually has your address, either from the delivery address or
credit card details, and there are people that copy keys and misuse
them.

Used cylinders are just as secure as new, if the seller doesn't know
where you live. If it doesn't come with 3 keys, bear in mind the cost
of copies. If its for external use, check its stamped EN.


==How to replace==
[[image:Eurolock screw 5321-3.jpg|right|100px]]
[[image:Eurolock going in 3976-3.jpg|right|100px]]



Replacement is simple:
# Open the door
# remove the retaining screw
# Turning the key about 30 degrees in the right direction enables the
cylinder to slide right out.
# Insert key in new cylinder, turn it, and slide the cylinder into
place. If it catches, waggle it.
# Replace the retaining screw


==Issues==
Issues sometimes encountered:

===Gain access===
If you're locked out and can't get in any other way, you can drill the
lock cylinder, or if there are no protection plates fitted, snap it in
two. if drilling, expect to ruin a few [[drill bit]]s in the process.

===Lock needs to accept old key===
In some situations you might need a new lock that takes the old key.
Rekeying a lock cylinder is a locksmith job.

===Stiffness===
The usual cause is a door that isn't correctly aligned with the frame,
resulting in a multilocking mechanism that isn't engaging 100%, thus
the lock refuses to engage readily.

[[Oil]]ing the cylinder is never the solution. It causes staining of
hands & clothing with dirty oil, and accumulation of muck inside the
lock that hinders operation.

===Key needs waggling===
If the key needs waggling to be able to turn, this is caused by a
poorly cut key copy. It can also happen on old lock cylinders that
have had a lot of use, and the mechanism is well worn.

===Key doesn't insert smoothly===
[[image:Key projections 5284-3.jpg|right|185px]]

The key needs waggling to insert, or is stiff to insert. Some keys
have a series of raised points between the pin landing areas as a
result of the way they're cut. This can cause keys to not go in
smoothly. The solution is to file these raised points on the key down
- obviously the pin landing areas must not be filed down.

In the picture to the right, the right key has these projections, the
left one doesn't. The 5 flat low points between the projections in the
right key are the pin landing areas.

===Key doesn't turn===
If a key just doesn't turn at all, its not uncommon for a copied key
to fail to work, due to a slight error in cutting.


==See also==
* [[Replace a lock cylinder]]
* [[Special:Allpages|Wiki Contents]]
* [[Special:Categories|Wiki Subject Categories]]
* [[Door Security]]
* [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cylinder_lock Wikipedia]


[[Category:Basics]]
[[Category:Doors]]
[[Category:Repair]]
[[Category:Security]]

d...@gglz.com

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Jan 29, 2012, 4:57:46 AM1/29/12
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I've found that very slightly slackening the retaining bolt can help
with hard-to-turn keys in euro-cylinders.

It might also be worth mentioning that there are now some very well
known attack methods on euro-cylinders, and the buyer may want to look
for locks that are anti-bump etc. Also that it's good to have the
barrel near-flush with the outside of the door to reduce forceful lock-
attacks. Otherwise over-length barrels will fit, but just look
unsightly. (perhaps also make clear that cylinder length is specified
as the distance to the lock face on either side in mm, from the
retaining bolt).

For people willing to spend a bit more, there are restricted key
profiles available, meaning that key duplicates can only be cut by
producing a certificate of ownership to the manufacturer or their
authorised dealers. Very useful if a key is loaned out.

Finally, locksmiths are able to make up keyed-alike sets of euro-
cylinders for the convenience of one-key-opens-all (or any other
pattern of master and sub-master keys on more sophisticated cylinders).

The Medway Handyman

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Jan 29, 2012, 5:32:48 AM1/29/12
to
On 29/01/2012 08:44, NT wrote:
> Based on the last one, tweaked to suit...
>
> NT
>
>
>
> [[image:Eurolock 2282-2.jpg|right|100px]]
> [[image:Euro_cylinder_481-3.jpg|right|100px]]
>
> Eurolocks are a modern pattern of cylinder deadlock. As well as key
> operation, thumbturn cylinders are available, mainly for bathrooms.

You wouldn't have a eurolock on a bathroom door Shirley?

Thumbturns are a good idea on the inside of external doors. If you
deadlock & remove the key, how do you get out fast enough in a fire?

>
> Replacing a eurolock key cylinder is very easy, you just need to get
> the right length of cylinder to suit the door thickness. The lock
> cylinder can be replaced on its own, without removing the lock itself.
>
> There are also other incompatible cylinder lock systems in use, such
> as [[night latches|Replace a lock cylinder]].
>
>
> ==How easy==
> Replacing the key cylinder is a very simple job, as long as you can
> open the door. The lock itself isn't replaced.
>
>
> ==Why replace==
> Apart from the obvious...
>
> A new cylinder is around £5 for a basic one, or £20 for one with 6
> hardened pins in 2011. So replacement is sometimes cheaper than
> copying keys. New cylinders usually come with 3 keys.
>
> When moving into a house, you've no idea who has keys. Its prudent to
> replace external cylinders.
>
> Some house insurance policies are invalid if a cylinder with
> unhardened pins is used on an external door. Such policies generally
> require a eurolock to meet EN....
>
>
> ==The new cylinder==
> [[image:Eurolock measurements 3978-3.jpg|right|250px]]
>
> The main choice with new cylinders is what length you need. The
> pictured one is called either 40-10-30 or 45-35.

Not just the overall length, its the distances either side of the centre
IYSWIM.


--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

Jim K

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Jan 29, 2012, 5:42:53 AM1/29/12
to
On Jan 29, 10:32 am, The Medway Handyman <davidl...@blueyonder.co.uk>
wrote:

> Thumbturns are a good idea on the inside of external doors.

Easier for thieving scrotes to get out looking "innocent" too....

> If you
> deadlock & remove the key, how do you get out fast enough in a fire?

keep the key handy ;>))

"avocet abs" cylinders now supplied by Police crime prevention bods -
after burglaries (I happen to know)

Jim K

Andrew Gabriel

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Jan 29, 2012, 6:07:31 AM1/29/12
to
In article <d79a92e1-919c-4a7f...@p13g2000yqd.googlegroups.com>,
NT <meow...@care2.com> writes:
> Based on the last one, tweaked to suit...
> NT
> [[image:Eurolock 2282-2.jpg|right|100px]]
> [[image:Euro_cylinder_481-3.jpg|right|100px]]
> Eurolocks are a modern pattern of cylinder deadlock. As well as key
> operation, thumbturn cylinders are available, mainly for bathrooms.
> Replacing a eurolock key cylinder is very easy, you just need to get
> the right length of cylinder to suit the door thickness. The lock

Not just the length, but you have to match the toggle position
along the length too - the toggle is often not centred (and is
also the retaining screwhole position).

The barrel must be flush (and not protrude) on the unsecured side of
the door (which is normally the outside, but can be both sides in some
cases).

> cylinder can be replaced on its own, without removing the lock itself.
> There are also other incompatible cylinder lock systems in use, such
> as [[night latches|Replace a lock cylinder]].
> ==How easy==
> Replacing the key cylinder is a very simple job, as long as you can
> open the door. The lock itself isn't replaced.
> ==Why replace==
> Apart from the obvious...
> A new cylinder is around £5 for a basic one, or £20 for one with 6
> hardened pins in 2011. So replacement is sometimes cheaper than
> copying keys. New cylinders usually come with 3 keys.
> When moving into a house, you've no idea who has keys. Its prudent to
> replace external cylinders.
> Some house insurance policies are invalid if a cylinder with
> unhardened pins is used on an external door. Such policies generally
> require a eurolock to meet EN....

That applies to the whole lock, and few if any PVC door locks conform,
but insurance policies often also allow multipoint locking PVC doors.

Could mention that a locksmith can make up barrels to match other keys
so a single key can operate a number of different types of locks.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]

The Medway Handyman

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Jan 29, 2012, 7:59:39 AM1/29/12
to
On 29/01/2012 10:42, Jim K wrote:
> On Jan 29, 10:32 am, The Medway Handyman<davidl...@blueyonder.co.uk>
> wrote:
>
>> Thumbturns are a good idea on the inside of external doors.
>
> Easier for thieving scrotes to get out looking "innocent" too....


You would be surprised at how many houses I go to which have the front
door locked & the key not handy.

Quite often I ring the bell, see someone in the hall & wait for 1 or 2
minutes while they find the key.

That could kill you in a fire.


>
>> If you
>> deadlock& remove the key, how do you get out fast enough in a fire?
>
> keep the key handy ;>))

So the scrotes can find it?

Mike Clarke

unread,
Jan 29, 2012, 8:57:01 AM1/29/12
to
On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 00:44:27 -0800 (PST)
NT <meow...@care2.com> wrote:

> Replacement is simple:
> # Open the door
> # remove the retaining screw
> # Turning the key about 30 degrees in the right direction enables the
> cylinder to slide right out.
> # Insert key in new cylinder, turn it, and slide the cylinder into
> place. If it catches, waggle it.

If it still catches then loosen the screws holding the handles in
place.

--
Mike Clarke

Jim K

unread,
Jan 29, 2012, 12:03:15 PM1/29/12
to
On Jan 29, 12:59 pm, The Medway Handyman <davidl...@blueyonder.co.uk>
wrote:
> On 29/01/2012 10:42, Jim K wrote:
>
> > On Jan 29, 10:32 am, The Medway Handyman<davidl...@blueyonder.co.uk>
> > wrote:
>
> >> Thumbturns are a good idea on the inside of external doors.
>
> > Easier for thieving scrotes to get out looking "innocent" too....
>
> You would be surprised at how many houses I go to which have the front
> door locked & the key not handy.
>
> Quite often I ring the bell, see someone in the hall & wait for 1 or 2
> minutes while they find the key.
>
> That could kill you in a fire.
>
>
>
> >> If you
> >> deadlock& remove the key, how do you get out fast enough in a fire?
>
> > keep the key handy ;>))
>
> So the scrotes can find it?

in my pocket?

Jim K

NT

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Jan 29, 2012, 1:26:47 PM1/29/12
to
On Jan 29, 8:44 am, NT <meow2...@care2.com> wrote:
> Based on the last one, tweaked to suit...
>
> NT

next version... thank you folks



[[image:Eurolock 2282-2.jpg|right|100px]]
[[image:Euro_cylinder_481-3.jpg|right|100px]]

Eurolocks are a modern pattern of cylinder deadlock. As well as key
operation, thumbturn cylinders are available, mainly for bathrooms.

Replacing a eurolock key cylinder is very easy, you just need to get
the right length of cylinder to suit the door thickness. The lock
cylinder can be replaced on its own, without removing the lock itself.

There are also other incompatible cylinder lock systems in use, such
as [[night latches|Replace a lock cylinder]].


==How easy==
Replacing the key cylinder is a very simple job, as long as you can
open the door. The lock itself isn't replaced.


==Why replace==
Apart from the obvious...

A new cylinder is around £5 for a basic one, or £20 for one with 6
hardened pins in 2011. So replacement is sometimes cheaper than
copying keys. New cylinders usually come with 3 keys.

When moving into a house, you've no idea who has keys. Its prudent to
replace external cylinders.

Some house insurance policies are only valid when a specified type of
cylinder is used on an external door. Such policies typically require
a cylinder with 6 hardened pins. (There are typically requirements for
the lock too, such as either meeting EN... or being a multipoint
lock.)


==The new cylinder==
[[image:Eurolock measurements 3978-3.jpg|right|250px]]

The main choice with new cylinders is what length you need. The
pictured one is called either 40-10-30 or 45-35. The replacement
cylinder does need to be the right size, cylinders that stick out are
rather vulnerable to well known attacks. And obviously a 33-55
couldn't be replaced with a 45-45. If the old cylinder is missing,
each of the 2 length figures is the distance in mm from the retaining
screw to the outer face.

Then you can have brass or chrome finish, and hardened or unhardened
pins, 5 or 6 pins, and key operated or thumbturn.
* Cheaper unhardened pin cylinders are easier to drill open
* house insurance often requires 6 hardened pins on external doors
* unhardened is usually preferable for internal rooms & cupboards,
easier to remove if keys are ever lost.

You can also get cylinders with restricted key profiles. Keys can then
only be copied by authorised dealers, once a certificate of ownership
has been produced.

You can also get keyed alike cylinders, and cylinders with master &
submaster keying etc. Locksmiths can make these up.

Eurolocks have been opened by burglars by snapping & bumping. Snap &
bump proof cylinders are available, like the [http://www.avocet-
hardware.co.uk/abs-secure.asp Avocet ABS].

Its best not to have new locks, cylinders or keys posted to you, the
seller usually has your address, either from the delivery address or
credit card details, and there are people that copy keys and misuse
them.

Used cylinders are just as secure as new, if the seller doesn't know
where you live.
* If it doesn't come with 3 keys, bear in mind the cost of copies
* If its for external use, check... stamped EN ?
* The number of pin landings on the key reveal whether its a 5 or 6
pin cylinder


==How to replace==
[[image:Eurolock screw 5321-3.jpg|right|100px]]
[[image:Eurolock going in 3976-3.jpg|right|100px]]



Replacement is simple:
# Open the door
# remove the retaining screw
# Turning the key about 30 degrees in the right direction enables the
cylinder to slide right out.
# Insert key in new cylinder, turn it, and slide the cylinder into
place. If it catches, waggle it. If it still catches, loosen the
handle screws a little temporarily.

Jim K

unread,
Jan 29, 2012, 1:38:27 PM1/29/12
to
maybe a bit more about measuring existing & selecting the appropriate
size and the "X:Y:Z" spec? Some anti-snap cylinders have to be
measured and selected so that the snappy bit is on the outside of the
door....

Comments about correct size cylinders being "flush" are a bit of a red
herring when a certain crim variation on the "snap" method is
considered.....
Also some supposed snapsafes are not necessarily crim proof hence
avocet abs being the Crime Prevention preference....

Jim K

The Medway Handyman

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Jan 29, 2012, 3:42:28 PM1/29/12
to
On 29/01/2012 17:03, Jim K wrote:
> On Jan 29, 12:59 pm, The Medway Handyman<davidl...@blueyonder.co.uk>
> wrote:
>> On 29/01/2012 10:42, Jim K wrote:
>>
>>> On Jan 29, 10:32 am, The Medway Handyman<davidl...@blueyonder.co.uk>
>>> wrote:
>>
>>>> Thumbturns are a good idea on the inside of external doors.
>>
>>> Easier for thieving scrotes to get out looking "innocent" too....
>>
>> You would be surprised at how many houses I go to which have the front
>> door locked& the key not handy.
>>
>> Quite often I ring the bell, see someone in the hall& wait for 1 or 2
>> minutes while they find the key.
>>
>> That could kill you in a fire.
>>
>>
>>
>>>> If you
>>>> deadlock& remove the key, how do you get out fast enough in a fire?
>>
>>> keep the key handy ;>))
>>
>> So the scrotes can find it?
>
> in my pocket?

Pyjamas pocket?

Nightjar

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Jan 29, 2012, 4:47:21 PM1/29/12
to
On 29/01/2012 09:57, d...@gglz.com wrote:
...
> For people willing to spend a bit more, there are restricted key
> profiles available, meaning that key duplicates can only be cut by
> producing a certificate of ownership to the manufacturer or their
> authorised dealers....

That was ruled as contrary to the EU anti-competition laws some years ago.

Colin Bignell
Message has been deleted

Steve Firth

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Jan 29, 2012, 5:22:49 PM1/29/12
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Huge <Hu...@nowhere.much.invalid> wrote:
> Didn't stop some scum-sucking toe-rag fitting one to my elderly M-I-Ls
> front door when she locked herself out a couple of years ago. She called
> someone from the Yellow Pages who came and drilled out the Yale lock and
> fitted a restricted profile lock instead. Are you listening, Totteridge
> Locksmiths, you thieving shits?
>
> I swapped it back for a real Yale lock a few weekends ago. Did they really
> imagine I was going to drive to Totteridge to get a key cut? Fuckers.
>
> (And yes, I *am* pretty angry about it. No idea what to do about it, though.)

I know people in Totteridge. It would be terrible if the locksmith's
premises had a superglue related accident.

Zapp Brannigan

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Jan 29, 2012, 5:24:46 PM1/29/12
to

<d...@gglz.com> wrote in message
news:f3ff596a-3935-4f44...@m11g2000yqe.googlegroups.com...

> It might also be worth mentioning that there are now some very well
> known attack methods on euro-cylinders, and the buyer may want to look
> for locks that are anti-bump etc. Also that it's good to have the
> barrel near-flush with the outside of the door to reduce forceful lock-
> attacks. Otherwise over-length barrels will fit, but just look
> unsightly.

Anti-snap seems to be the key (ouch) here. A deliberate weak point halfway
along the keyway, so that some pins remain active.

Nightjar

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Jan 29, 2012, 6:08:19 PM1/29/12
to
On 29/01/2012 22:11, Huge wrote:
> On 2012-01-29, Nightjar<c...@insert.my.surname.here.me.uk> wrote:
> Didn't stop some scum-sucking toe-rag fitting one to my elderly M-I-Ls
> front door when she locked herself out a couple of years ago. She called
> someone from the Yellow Pages who came and drilled out the Yale lock and
> fitted a restricted profile lock instead. Are you listening, Totteridge
> Locksmiths, you thieving shits?
>
> I swapped it back for a real Yale lock a few weekends ago. Did they really
> imagine I was going to drive to Totteridge to get a key cut? Fuckers.
>
> (And yes, I *am* pretty angry about it. No idea what to do about it, though.)

There is nothing to stop anyone fitting them. What is illegal is to
refuse to supply the key blanks to anyone else to cut, which rather
defeats the whole idea of a restricted profile.

Colin Bignell

NT

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Jan 29, 2012, 6:55:24 PM1/29/12
to
On both counts, what would you like added?

> Some anti-snap cylinders have to be
> measured and selected so that the snappy bit is on the outside of the
> door....
>
> Comments about correct size cylinders being "flush" are a bit of a red
> herring when a certain crim variation on the "snap" method is
> considered.....
> Also some supposed snapsafes are not necessarily crim proof hence
> avocet abs being the Crime Prevention preference....
>
> Jim K

Do you have something specific about the Abs versus other types?

thanks,


NT

Jim K

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Jan 29, 2012, 7:16:58 PM1/29/12
to

Jim K

unread,
Jan 29, 2012, 7:23:32 PM1/29/12
to
On Jan 29, 11:55 pm, NT <meow2...@care2.com> wrote:

> > maybe a bit more about measuring existing & selecting the appropriate
> > size and the "X:Y:Z" spec?
>
> On both counts, what would you like added?

?? it reads like you haven't done it?

read up on chossing and fitting - it's not rocket science...

<snip>
> Do you have something specific about the Abs versus other types?
>
> thanks,

more here

http://www.avocet-hardware.co.uk/images/catalogue/abs-a3-flyer-1110-wm-lr.pdf

Jim K

The Medway Handyman

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Jan 29, 2012, 7:39:32 PM1/29/12
to
But it is still the case Colin.

I took over the running of an office block around 6 months ago, the
previous caretaker having left under a cloud, most of the keys going
missing.

Several keys were 'security' keys & my local locksmith, who I know very
well, refused to cut duplicates.

I had to get a letter of authorisation sent to a locksmith on the other
side of town in order to get extra keys cut.

Owain

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Jan 29, 2012, 8:01:44 PM1/29/12
to
On Jan 29, 8:42 pm, The Medway Handyman wrote:
> > in my pocket?
> Pyjamas pocket?

small magnetic keyring, and body piercing.

Owain

Nightjar

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Jan 29, 2012, 8:06:10 PM1/29/12
to
On 30/01/2012 00:16, Jim K wrote:
...
> some here
> http://www.avocet-hardware.co.uk/abs-secure.asp

One of the problems that arose when car manufacturers started making
cars more difficult to steal was that it increased crimes against the
person, as people were mugged for their car keys. I see a similar danger
if houses get too secure. Remember, the idea is not to make your house
impossible to break into, merely more difficult than your neighbours'
houses.

Colin Bignell

Jim K

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Jan 29, 2012, 8:18:55 PM1/29/12
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On Jan 30, 1:06 am, Nightjar <c...@insert.my.surname.here.me.uk>
wrote:
well yeah but car thieves are after the car, house thieves are after
contents - they'll always find a way in if it's worth their risk/time.
Idea is to make it harder/riskier

JIm K

NT

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Jan 29, 2012, 7:35:41 PM1/29/12
to
On Jan 30, 12:23 am, Jim K <jk989...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Jan 29, 11:55 pm, NT <meow2...@care2.com> wrote:

> > > maybe a bit more about measuring existing & selecting the appropriate
> > > size and the "X:Y:Z" spec?
>
> > On both counts, what would you like added?
>
> ?? it reads like you haven't done it?
>
> read up on chossing and fitting - it's not rocket science...

I've done it plenty of times, its trivial, and I've written what one
needs to know, that I'm aware of. If you have more, say what it is.


> > Do you have something specific about the Abs versus other types?
>
> > thanks,
>
> more here
>
> http://www.avocet-hardware.co.uk/images/catalogue/abs-a3-flyer-1110-w...
>
> Jim K

I'm not going to do a drivel and put promotional hype into an article.


NT
Message has been deleted

Nightjar

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Jan 30, 2012, 3:50:20 AM1/30/12
to
There is nothing illegal about your local locksmith refusing to cut the
keys. However, if he had chosen to do so and the other locksmith had
refused to supply the blanks, that would have been a restriction on free
trade and, hence, illegal.

Colin Bignell

Nightjar

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Jan 30, 2012, 4:00:26 AM1/30/12
to
The idea is to make it harder, without having unintended consequences,
like increasing a different type of crime. I would rather have someone
break into my house than to mug me for the keys. Property is replaceable.

Some years ago, I was invited on to a government think tank that was
looking at exactly that problem - the possible side effects of
anti-crime measures. It was surprising what unintended effects various
measures, both anti-crime and others, such as road safety, had produced.
We also came up with a number of possible future trends, some of which
have since come to pass.

Colin Bignell

fred

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Jan 30, 2012, 8:03:56 AM1/30/12
to
In article <jg4gvl$gen$1...@dont-email.me>, Zapp Brannigan
<ZBr...@DOOP.com> writes
Emperor's new clothes IMV, snap off the front (removing all anti drill
protection) and leave a few pins that will succumb more easily to a
screwdriver bashed in and turned with a spanner, 20s max.

IMV the only way to protect a euro cylinder is with a security
escutcheon (as per BS guidance on the subject), all security rated BS
eurolocks have security escutcheons.

They have their place of course but even a protected one is no match for
a 15quid BS approved 5 lever mortice deadlock/sashlock.
--
fred
it's a ba-na-na . . . .

The Medway Handyman

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Jan 30, 2012, 2:58:51 PM1/30/12
to
It may be illegal, but my guy wouldn't even ask the other guy for the
blanks. And I suspect the same would happen the other way around.
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