Soldering chromed pipe

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Andrew Gabriel

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Jul 1, 2008, 8:48:37 AM7/1/08
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Anyone tried soldering chromed pipe?
Looking to make a join with an endfeed fitting rather than a bulky
chrome compression fitting, which I might try painting silver afterwards.
I presume you have to strip the chrome to do the soldering, but does
the heat wreck the chrome further back up the pipe? (I don't have a
piece to hand to try it on, or I'd answer my own question.)

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]

bolt...@mailbolt.com

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Jul 1, 2008, 8:55:09 AM7/1/08
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You don't have to strip the chrome fully - but abrading it helps. I've
never done it on a joint in view, but as far as I recall, the chrome
gets a bit rainbow hued for about 1cm max from the joint - other than
that, it is unaffected. I don't know whether it would polish out
again.

Bruce

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Jul 1, 2008, 9:09:02 AM7/1/08
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and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

>Anyone tried soldering chromed pipe?
>Looking to make a join with an endfeed fitting rather than a bulky
>chrome compression fitting, which I might try painting silver afterwards.
>I presume you have to strip the chrome to do the soldering, but does
>the heat wreck the chrome further back up the pipe? (I don't have a
>piece to hand to try it on, or I'd answer my own question.)


The heat doesn't wreck the chrome, but it can turn it a little blueish
or brownish, while still leaving it shiny. A gentle rub with some
chrome polish (Solvol Autosol) is usually enough to restore it.

It is worth shielding the pipe to keep any discolouration to a
minimum.

John

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Jul 1, 2008, 11:04:47 AM7/1/08
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"Bruce" <n...@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:paak64hkjp3camjc3...@4ax.com...

I have serious doubts as to whether the solder will really work properly.
Soldering actually alloys itself into the metals being jointed. (I recall
sectioning and polishing samples at college) Chrome wouldn't alloy to the
solder - you may end up sticking the parts together - but it won't be as
good as solder on copper (IMHO).


Harry Bloomfield

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Jul 1, 2008, 11:09:17 AM7/1/08
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Andrew Gabriel submitted this idea :

> Anyone tried soldering chromed pipe?
> Looking to make a join with an endfeed fitting rather than a bulky
> chrome compression fitting, which I might try painting silver afterwards.
> I presume you have to strip the chrome to do the soldering, but does
> the heat wreck the chrome further back up the pipe? (I don't have a
> piece to hand to try it on, or I'd answer my own question.)

Well don't do what a British Gas - gas fitter did in my parents home
some years ago...

He tried to solder a copper fitting onto a chromed copper pipe without
taking the chrome off first. Of course the solder never wetted the pipe
at all and later the pipe worked its way out of the fitting causing a
gas leak. Strip the chrome off back to clean copper with abrasive and
you will be fine.

--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk


stillno...@gmail.com

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Jul 1, 2008, 11:29:26 AM7/1/08
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Thats what I did in my bathroom to use chrome on the rad tails and the
joint worked fine .

nightjar

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Jul 1, 2008, 1:06:05 PM7/1/08
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"Andrew Gabriel" <and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:486a27a5$0$78081$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk...

> Anyone tried soldering chromed pipe?
> Looking to make a join with an endfeed fitting rather than a bulky
> chrome compression fitting, which I might try painting silver afterwards.
> I presume you have to strip the chrome to do the soldering, but does
> the heat wreck the chrome further back up the pipe? (I don't have a
> piece to hand to try it on, or I'd answer my own question.)

Poor quality chrome can flake, due to differential expansion, but otherwise
there should be no noticeable effect, unless you overheat it. The best way
to strip the chrome off is to heat the pipe gently and dip it in
hydrochloric acid. Naturally, this is something that needs to be done with
care and with suitable protective measures, but you get very precise control
over how far it is stripped back and a neat line between chromed and (very
clean) non-chromed bits. Solder as quickly as possible after dipping for
best effect.

Colin Bignell


The Natural Philosopher

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Jul 1, 2008, 1:22:05 PM7/1/08
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Andrew Gabriel wrote:
> Anyone tried soldering chromed pipe?

You can't.

> Looking to make a join with an endfeed fitting rather than a bulky
> chrome compression fitting, which I might try painting silver afterwards.
> I presume you have to strip the chrome to do the soldering, but does
> the heat wreck the chrome further back up the pipe? (I don't have a
> piece to hand to try it on, or I'd answer my own question.)
>

My experience with chrome is you never get the stuff off, or it comes
off in huge ugly flakes.

stillno...@gmail.com

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Jul 1, 2008, 1:50:11 PM7/1/08
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On Tue, 01 Jul 2008 18:22:05 +0100, The Natural Philosopher <a@b.c>
wrote:

Not my experience .I just used rough sandpaper to start it then
finished with fine stuff .It wasn't easy but it came off in time .

Bruce

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Jul 1, 2008, 7:29:52 PM7/1/08
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"John" <Who90...@ntlworld.com> wrote:

>I have serious doubts as to whether the solder will really work properly.
>Soldering actually alloys itself into the metals being jointed. (I recall
>sectioning and polishing samples at college) Chrome wouldn't alloy to the
>solder - you may end up sticking the parts together - but it won't be as
>good as solder on copper (IMHO).


That is a valid point, but with respect, Andrew said at the outset
that he would be removing the chrome plating from the end of the
chromed copper pipe so that the solder would take.

Frank Erskine

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Jul 2, 2008, 3:08:33 AM7/2/08
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You'd probably be better off using stainless steel rather than
chrome-plated pipe.

--
Frank Erskine

bolt...@mailbolt.com

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Jul 2, 2008, 6:42:54 AM7/2/08
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On 1 Jul, 16:04, "John" <Who90nos...@ntlworld.com> wrote:
> "Bruce" <n...@nospam.net> wrote in message

> I have serious doubts as to whether the solder will really work properly.


> Soldering actually alloys itself into the metals being jointed. (I recall
> sectioning and polishing samples at college) Chrome wouldn't alloy to the
> solder - you may end up sticking the parts together - but it won't be as

> good as solder on copper (IMHO).- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

As long as you abrade it enough to get some copper shining through in
the troughs of the scratches, the solder will take well enough in my
experience. Having said that, it's only four years and counting since
the first one I did, so there would be ample time for premature
failure. It seems easy enough to tell the difference between one
which hasn't worked (the solder doesn't wet the joint properly at all)
and one which has.

Bruce

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Jul 2, 2008, 7:34:01 AM7/2/08
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Frank Erskine <frank....@btinternet.com> wrote:


How well does solder take to stainless steel? That's a genuine
question, because I have never tried it.

The Natural Philosopher

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Jul 2, 2008, 9:24:43 AM7/2/08
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Mostly it doesn't.

It's probably the chrome in the steel...;-)

Haidee01

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Jun 14, 2018, 8:14:19 AM6/14/18
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replying to John, Haidee01 wrote:
Hey, I believe you are thinking of welding where the weld alloys with the
parent metals, in soldering however, the temperature used is not high enough
to melt the parent metals so only the filler metal will be melted. Aside from
discolouring, solder should work on the chrome

--
for full context, visit https://www.homeownershub.com/uk-diy/soldering-chromed-pipe-491014-.htm


The Natural Philosopher

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Jun 14, 2018, 11:22:52 AM6/14/18
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On 14/06/18 13:14, Haidee01 wrote:
> replying to John, Haidee01 wrote:
> Hey, I believe you are thinking of welding where the weld alloys with the
> parent metals, in soldering however, the temperature used is not high
> enough
> to melt the parent metals so only the filler metal will be melted. Aside
> from
> discolouring, solder should work on the chrome

Golly. Only ten years out of date


--
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(or environmental activism) is becoming a general ideology about humans,
about their freedom, about the relationship between the individual and
the state, and about the manipulation of people under the guise of a
'noble' idea. It is not an honest pursuit of 'sustainable development,'
a matter of elementary environmental protection, or a search for
rational mechanisms designed to achieve a healthy environment. Yet
things do occur that make you shake your head and remind yourself that
you live neither in Joseph Stalin’s Communist era, nor in the Orwellian
utopia of 1984.”

Vaclav Klaus

Dave W

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Jun 14, 2018, 4:15:52 PM6/14/18
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On Thu, 14 Jun 2018 16:22:50 +0100, The Natural Philosopher
<t...@invalid.invalid> wrote:

>On 14/06/18 13:14, Haidee01 wrote:
>> replying to John, Haidee01 wrote:
>> Hey, I believe you are thinking of welding where the weld alloys with the
>> parent metals, in soldering however, the temperature used is not high
>> enough
>> to melt the parent metals so only the filler metal will be melted. Aside
>> from
>> discolouring, solder should work on the chrome
>
>Golly. Only ten years out of date

And I didn't think chrome can be soldered.
--
Dave W

Harry Bloomfield

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Jun 14, 2018, 5:24:30 PM6/14/18
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Dave W formulated on Thursday :
> And I didn't think chrome can be soldered.

It cannot be soldered. It can if the chrome plating is removed first.

harry

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Jun 15, 2018, 2:07:01 AM6/15/18
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On Tuesday, 1 July 2008 13:48:37 UTC+1, Andrew Gabriel wrote:
> Anyone tried soldering chromed pipe?
> Looking to make a join with an endfeed fitting rather than a bulky
> chrome compression fitting, which I might try painting silver afterwards.
> I presume you have to strip the chrome to do the soldering, but does
> the heat wreck the chrome further back up the pipe? (I don't have a
> piece to hand to try it on, or I'd answer my own question.)
>
> --

I have always stripped the chrome off completely on the bench grinder. (Angle grinder with longer bits of pipe.)
This is after I assembled some solder joints which just blew apart under mains pressure.
'Twas years ago, maybe fluxes have improved.

mb0...@gmail.com

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Jun 22, 2018, 8:46:27 AM6/22/18
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On Tuesday, 1 July 2008 13:48:37 UTC+1, Andrew Gabriel wrote:
Why Chrome pushfits? Used these on a shower years ago and no problems so far.

Andrew Gabriel

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Jun 22, 2018, 10:45:55 AM6/22/18
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In article <5b513246-f2eb-4d8f...@googlegroups.com>,
mb0...@gmail.com writes:
> On Tuesday, 1 July 2008 13:48:37 UTC+1, Andrew Gabriel wrote:
>> Anyone tried soldering chromed pipe?
>> Looking to make a join with an endfeed fitting rather than a bulky
>> chrome compression fitting, which I might try painting silver afterwards.
>> I presume you have to strip the chrome to do the soldering, but does
>> the heat wreck the chrome further back up the pipe? (I don't have a
>> piece to hand to try it on, or I'd answer my own question.)
>
> Why Chrome pushfits? Used these on a shower years ago and no problems so far.

Well, since I asked that 10 years ago, if I'd used pushfit,
they would be halfway through the life of the O-rings by now.
I generally design my plumbing installations to last longer
than the lifetime of pushfit couplings.
It's not smart to design a plumbing installation that is
likely to fail in my old age.

Second issue is that the chrome is very hard, and the grab
rings often fail to bite into it, and the coupling comes off
some random time later. So you should strip the chrome for
pushfit fittings too.

Third, I'm using chrome to make the installation look nice.
Why would I spoil that with bulbous pushfit fittings?
On appearance, I wiped solder over the outside of the end-
feed couplings whilst soldering them, and then they blended
in with the chrome pipe.

Harry Bloomfield

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Jun 22, 2018, 11:02:44 AM6/22/18
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Andrew Gabriel wrote :
> Well, since I asked that 10 years ago, if I'd used pushfit,
> they would be halfway through the life of the O-rings by now.
> I generally design my plumbing installations to last longer
> than the lifetime of pushfit couplings.
> It's not smart to design a plumbing installation that is
> likely to fail in my old age.
>
> Second issue is that the chrome is very hard, and the grab
> rings often fail to bite into it, and the coupling comes off
> some random time later. So you should strip the chrome for
> pushfit fittings too.
>
> Third, I'm using chrome to make the installation look nice.
> Why would I spoil that with bulbous pushfit fittings?
> On appearance, I wiped solder over the outside of the end-
> feed couplings whilst soldering them, and then they blended
> in with the chrome pipe.

Is the correct answer lol

mb0...@gmail.com

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Jun 22, 2018, 11:35:22 AM6/22/18
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On Tuesday, 1 July 2008 13:48:37 UTC+1, Andrew Gabriel wrote:
All fair points but the ones I used were a similar size to Yorkshire fittings.
not sure about the lifespan but after ten years (shower install) they seem to be OK.
Techtite make no mention of a lifespan but I'm strictly an amateur so only speaking of one experience, maybe ignorance is bliss?
The post is as you say 10yrs old (I didn't notice that) so it's a moot ponit now.

Tim+

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Jun 22, 2018, 3:05:07 PM6/22/18
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You’d make a lot more sense if you learned to quote what you’re replying
too rather than a 10 year old post (like I’ve just done).

Tim

--
Please don't feed the trolls
Message has been deleted

mb0...@gmail.com

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Jun 23, 2018, 10:48:50 AM6/23/18
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My apologies Oh great troll master. I'm deeply ashamed at my lack of skill and knowledge of newgroup etiquette. Now fuck off and don't let the door hit you in the arse as you leave.

johnone12

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Jan 27, 2019, 8:14:05 PM1/27/19
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replying to boltmail, johnone12 wrote:
use a dremel, with the barrel roll fitted. removes chrome in a minute

tabb...@gmail.com

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Jan 28, 2019, 3:44:57 AM1/28/19
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On Monday, 28 January 2019 01:14:05 UTC, johnone12 wrote:
> replying to boltmail, johnone12 wrote:
> use a dremel, with the barrel roll fitted. removes chrome in a minute

You don't think he's already done the job in the 11 years since asking then.

Brian Gaff

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Jan 28, 2019, 4:57:02 AM1/28/19
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He might have been stranded on Mars or something...
Or maybe not.
That bloody site needs a big rocket up its bum it sorts to months and
ignores years.
Brian

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