Slab cutting - what do I need?

1 view
Skip to first unread message

A.Lee

unread,
Jun 28, 2007, 8:12:37 AM6/28/07
to
I've just been given a job to slab someones back garden, having only cut
up a few slabs before with my 115mm grinder, I realise it will not be up
to the job for this one where there are around 20 slabs needing cutting.

What should I get to do this?

Screwfix are doing a Dewalt 9" grinder for £70 - would this be alright?

And also, which discs should I go for - this'll be basic builders
merchant supplied conrete slabs.

Thanks
Alan.

--
To reply by e-mail, change the ' + ' to 'plus'.

Andrew Mawson

unread,
Jun 28, 2007, 8:23:13 AM6/28/07
to

"A.Lee" <alan@darkroom.+.com> wrote in message
news:1i0f5qe.1y526m81x5of0kN%alan@darkroom.+.com...

If they are solid concrete slabs it'll be hard going with an angle
grinder.

What you REALLY REALLY need is one of these, and now is you excuse to
buy one <G> :

http://tinyurl.com/2dey66

AWEM


Mathew Newton

unread,
Jun 28, 2007, 8:39:08 AM6/28/07
to
On 28 Jun, 13:23, "Andrew Mawson"
<andrew@no_spam_please_mawson.org.uk> wrote:
> "A.Lee" <a...@darkroom.+.com> wrote in message

>
> news:1i0f5qe.1y526m81x5of0kN%alan@darkroom.+.com...
>
>
>
>
>
> > I've just been given a job to slab someones back garden, having only
> cut
> > up a few slabs before with my 115mm grinder, I realise it will not
> be up
> > to the job for this one where there are around 20 slabs needing
> cutting.

> If they are solid concrete slabs it'll be hard going with an angle
> grinder.

It need not be. Remember you don't have to cut all the way through - a
groove (possibly half-depth) will suffice with a full depth cut right
at the ends.

Plenty of good advice at http://www.pavingexpert.com/cut_in01.htm

I recently laid a patio with about 20-30 slabs requiring cutting and
my standard angle grinder (with cheap stone cutting discs) worked
fine.

Mathew

robgraham

unread,
Jun 28, 2007, 10:48:05 AM6/28/07
to
On 28 Jun, 13:39, Mathew Newton <use...@newtonnet.co.uk> wrote:
> On 28 Jun, 13:23, "Andrew Mawson"
>
>
>
> <andrew@no_spam_please_mawson.org.uk> wrote:
> > "A.Lee" <a...@darkroom.+.com> wrote in message
>
> >news:1i0f5qe.1y526m81x5of0kN%alan@darkroom.+.com...
>
> > > I've just been given a job to slab someones back garden, having only
> > cut
> > > up a few slabs before with my 115mm grinder, I realise it will not
> > be up
> > > to the job for this one where there are around 20 slabs needing
> > cutting.
> > If they are solid concrete slabs it'll be hard going with an angle
> > grinder.
>
> It need not be. Remember you don't have to cut all the way through - a
> groove (possibly half-depth) will suffice with a full depth cut right
> at the ends.
>
> Plenty of good advice athttp://www.pavingexpert.com/cut_in01.htm

>
> I recently laid a patio with about 20-30 slabs requiring cutting and
> my standard angle grinder (with cheap stone cutting discs) worked
> fine.
>
> Mathew

Have to agree with Mathew - I cut 10 in half using the small angle
grinder, just putting a groove along each side, so that I could put an
edging round my veg patch.

Rob

The Natural Philosopher

unread,
Jun 28, 2007, 10:48:27 AM6/28/07
to
Best of all is hire a concrete saw. Not expensive.
A diamond blade on the angle grinder may well be similar price - check
with the stockist and get one suitable for concrete.

The limitation on an angle grinder is the depth of cut.

daddy...@gmail.com

unread,
Jun 28, 2007, 11:53:54 AM6/28/07
to

Done mine with a Makita 9" grinder and budget diamond blade from
Screwfix (which is still going several jobs later). Very easy work but
just make sure you keep your body clear of the line of the grinder.
I'm sure the budget £15/£20 grinders work just as well.

Malcolm Race

unread,
Jun 28, 2007, 12:09:43 PM6/28/07
to
Go for a budget 9 inch. Faced with a similar situation a few years ago
I bought a 9 inch Ferm and used Screwfix cutting discs. It cut a 2 inch
slab in 5 or 6 passes, but it is a powerful beast.Cut in such a way that
the disc does not jam in the cut - if it does you will not be able to
control the kick, even though the disc slows quickly with the power off.
I have no experience of diamond discs but conventional ones produce a
large amount of dust - don't do it when your neighbours (or SWMBO) have
any washing out:-)

Malcolm

Andy Dingley

unread,
Jun 28, 2007, 12:17:07 PM6/28/07
to
On 28 Jun, 13:12, a...@darkroom.+.com (A.Lee) wrote:

> And also, which discs should I go for - this'll be basic builders
> merchant supplied conrete slabs.

Diamond. Dirt cheap these days - check eBay.

Cheap angle grinders usually work as well as good ones, but with
obvious lifetime limits. However the big difference is that they weigh
around twice what a good (£80ish) one weighs. For cutting slabs flat
on the floor this is almost an advantage, even though it's normally a
damn nuisance.

Dave Liquorice

unread,
Jun 30, 2007, 4:50:28 PM6/30/07
to
On Thu, 28 Jun 2007 13:12:37 +0100, A.Lee wrote:

> What should I get to do this?

Lump hammer, bolster chisel and tin of elbow grease.

Stone cutting or a diamond blade in an angle grinder will cut a slot and
make *lots* of dust. Once you have a slot about 3/8" deep along the entire
face and down the edges place the slab, slot upper most, over over an edge
and snap it.

--
Cheers new...@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail

The Natural Philosopher

unread,
Jun 30, 2007, 7:08:22 PM6/30/07
to
Dave Liquorice wrote:
> On Thu, 28 Jun 2007 13:12:37 +0100, A.Lee wrote:
>
>> What should I get to do this?
>
> Lump hammer, bolster chisel and tin of elbow grease.
>
> Stone cutting or a diamond blade in an angle grinder will cut a slot and
> make *lots* of dust.

Not if the slab is thoroughly wet first..

Weatherlawyer

unread,
Jul 1, 2007, 3:01:06 AM7/1/07
to

The traditional wetting agent for diamond is olive oil. Not that I am
suggesting it.

Is the diamond really diamond?

The Natural Philosopher

unread,
Jul 1, 2007, 5:58:33 AM7/1/07
to
Yes. I use water myself.
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages