Another (cold) water tank question

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AJH

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Sep 23, 2021, 4:22:09 PMSep 23
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Has anyone experience of galvanised water tanks failing after years of
use and corrosion. Mine must be over 42 years old and probably from 1959
when the bathroom was added, it looks very rusty inside but the outside
galvanising looks okay, should I worry?

Chris Bacon

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Sep 23, 2021, 4:44:48 PMSep 23
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If it was made in 1959, simple arithmetic says it's over 60 yars old.

If it's a worry, replace it ("the cistern") with a plastic tank, or two
connected together.

newshound

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Sep 23, 2021, 4:59:44 PMSep 23
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On 23/09/2021 21:22, AJH wrote:
Almost impossible to answer. 42 years ago copper would have been the
usual domestic solution, so I'd guess it is original.

If there is *any* sign of leakage, it's time to act. Do you know if it
is supported on beams, or on a flat surface? The plates are thinner than
the angle iron frame, so these are the weak spots. When they are
undisturbed, the rust can hold them together.

Jeff Layman

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Sep 23, 2021, 5:30:49 PMSep 23
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On 23/09/2021 21:22, AJH wrote:
Only if the tank is in the loft and it was installed when the place was
built and the roof was constructed around it! From what I've seen, you
can sometimes only get quite small replacement tanks though many loft
hatches.

--

Jeff

Theo

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Sep 23, 2021, 6:07:46 PMSep 23
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If it's structurally mostly OK, just leaking, can you get liners that will
go inside to waterproof the structure?

Or you could go for a battery of smaller tanks that will fit, like these:
https://www.ecosure.co.uk/acatalog/75_litre_to_1000_litre_Potable_water_tanks.html

Theo

Michael Chare

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Sep 23, 2021, 6:41:07 PMSep 23
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On 23/09/2021 21:22, AJH wrote:
Once when I wanted to sell a house the purchaser complained about the
galvanised water tank so I replaced it with a plastic one. I had to cut
the old tank in half to remove it from the roof. It was hard work, as
far as I could tell the old tank was fine.

Chris J Dixon

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Sep 24, 2021, 3:22:09 AMSep 24
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Theo wrote:

>Or you could go for a battery of smaller tanks that will fit, like these:
>https://www.ecosure.co.uk/acatalog/75_litre_to_1000_litre_Potable_water_tanks.html

I had similar fitted when my system was renewed a few years ago.

They made a point of ensuring that the feed and draw off were at
opposite ends of the group of 4, to avoid stagnation.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
ch...@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1

Plant amazing Acers.

Brian Gaff (Sofa)

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Sep 24, 2021, 4:13:57 AMSep 24
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Well, Ours went with a seep, but not until the mid 60s and it was put in in
1939. My only gripe is that its been wedged in the loft space ever since as
its too big to go through the loft hatch. How did they get it in there in
the first place?
Brian

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Ian Jackson

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Sep 24, 2021, 5:19:44 AMSep 24
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In message <sik1c3$fmu$1...@dont-email.me>, "Brian Gaff (Sofa)"
<bri...@blueyonder.co.uk> writes
>Well, Ours went with a seep, but not until the mid 60s and it was put in in
>1939. My only gripe is that its been wedged in the loft space ever since as
>its too big to go through the loft hatch. How did they get it in there in
>the first place?
> Brian
>
Was it put in while the house was being built? I had the same problem.
The house was built in 1955, and I moved in in 1980. The rusting steel
tank had been superseded by a plastic one - but it had been left there,
sitting beside it. Too big for the hatch, so I had to saw it in half to
get it out. [An angle grinder would have been useful!]
--
Ian

Bev

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Sep 24, 2021, 6:06:59 AMSep 24
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Way, way back in the early 1980's we bought a house built in the late
60's or early 70's. We spotted that there was a very slight rust patch
on the outside of the tank (in the cistern cupbaord not loft) - it lasted
a further 12 monts before a pinprick leak started. We changed the tank.

So, at the age of yours I'd swap it out.

Rod Speed

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Sep 24, 2021, 6:09:38 AMSep 24
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Brian Gaff (Sofa) <bri...@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote

> Well, Ours went with a seep, but not until the mid 60s and it was put in
> in 1939. My only gripe is that its been wedged in the loft space ever
> since as its too big to go through the loft hatch. How did they get it in
> there in the first place?

By putting it in the roof space as the roof was being built.

noth...@aolbin.com

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Sep 24, 2021, 7:49:44 AMSep 24
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On 23/09/2021 21:22, AJH wrote:
At that age, given the devastation that could result from a failure, I
would remove it ASAP. Also, you may have galvanised pipes that will be
starting to generate flakes of rust.
Providing your mains water pressure and flow rate are OK I would remove
the need for a header tank by converting to mains pressure DHW and mains
water at all cold taps. It's a fairly simple change but the DHW cylinder
will probably need replacing unless it's a new'ish one and rated for
mains pressure. Benefits are increased DHW pressure, potable water at
all taps and less plumbing in the roof space.

Unknown

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Sep 24, 2021, 7:59:30 AMSep 24
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noth...@aolbin.com wrote on 24/09/2021 :
> At that age, given the devastation that could result from a failure, I would
> remove it ASAP. Also, you may have galvanised pipes that will be starting to
> generate flakes of rust.
> Providing your mains water pressure and flow rate are OK I would remove the
> need for a header tank by converting to mains pressure DHW and mains water at
> all cold taps. It's a fairly simple change but the DHW cylinder will probably
> need replacing unless it's a new'ish one and rated for mains pressure.
> Benefits are increased DHW pressure, potable water at all taps and less
> plumbing in the roof space.

Although, before deciding on that, it might be worth checking that
there is adequate flow and pressure from the cold water mains to
support a shower.

Peeler

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Sep 24, 2021, 9:29:19 AMSep 24
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On Fri, 24 Sep 2021 20:09:29 +1000, cantankerous trolling geezer Rodent
Speed, the auto-contradicting senile sociopath, blabbered, again:

<FLUSH the abnormal trolling senile cretin's latest trollshit>

--
Norman Wells addressing trolling senile Rodent:
"Ah, the voice of scum speaks."
MID: <g4t0jt...@mid.individual.net>

AJH

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Sep 24, 2021, 5:31:25 PMSep 24
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Good point, there is no way it fitted through the loft hatch and the
ceilings are all lath and plaster so I must have been much earlier as
the house is 1862 build.

There was a fire prior to 1939 so it may date from then.

AJH

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Sep 24, 2021, 5:33:46 PMSep 24
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On 24/09/2021 08:22, Chris J Dixon wrote:
> Theo wrote:
>
>> Or you could go for a battery of smaller tanks that will fit, like these:
>> https://www.ecosure.co.uk/acatalog/75_litre_to_1000_litre_Potable_water_tanks.html
>
> I had similar fitted when my system was renewed a few years ago.
>
> They made a point of ensuring that the feed and draw off were at
> opposite ends of the group of 4, to avoid stagnation.
>
> Chris
>

Is there any good reason for needing that much cold water storage
nowadays? Biggest draw down would be a bath.

Anyway there is a well in the garden that I could use for washing if needed.

AJH

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Sep 24, 2021, 5:37:49 PMSep 24
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Yes this would require a new connection to the main, the current
galvanised mains water pipe is under the extension and the flow is poor.
This would likely precipitate having a meter fitted which in my case
could well reduce the water bill.

AJH

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Sep 24, 2021, 5:39:45 PMSep 24
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On 24/09/2021 10:19, Ian Jackson wrote:
> Was it put in while the house was being built? I had the same problem.
> The house was built in 1955, and I moved in in 1980. The rusting steel
> tank had been superseded by a plastic one - but it had been left there,
> sitting beside it. Too big for the hatch, so I had to saw it in half to
> get it out. [An angle grinder would have been useful!]


I had this in a bungalow at work and decided an angle grinder was too
dangerous a fire risk so cut it into four with a sabre saw, it took a
while and about three blades.

Chris J Dixon

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Sep 25, 2021, 2:37:06 AMSep 25
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AJH wrote:

>On 24/09/2021 08:22, Chris J Dixon wrote:

>> I had similar fitted when my system was renewed a few years ago.
>>
>> They made a point of ensuring that the feed and draw off were at
>> opposite ends of the group of 4, to avoid stagnation.

>Is there any good reason for needing that much cold water storage
>nowadays? Biggest draw down would be a bath.

Quite so, and as I was having a larger one fitted, I needed more
storage.

This is the one:

<http://www.airbath.nationwide-bathrooms.co.uk/elegance/baths/airbath-elegance-double-ended-bath.html>

Vir Campestris

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Sep 27, 2021, 4:41:48 PMSep 27
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My rich great uncle (who didn't believe in passing wealth down) once
owned a _big_ country house. I found the tank once - there was a big
plastic tank in the middle of an attic, and leaning against the walls
were the remains of the original (prewar) galvanised tank.

It had been cut up with a gas axe :O I could tell by the melt.

Andy

AJH

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Sep 28, 2021, 7:01:43 AMSep 28
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Well the house didn't burn down so it worked. Generally I found an angle
grinder with a 9" cutting wheel was faster than a oxy-propane cutter on
thin sheet, I think because there was insufficient burning iron to
propagate the cut.

Anyway I have had a further inspection and will risk it till next
summer, given my incompetence with plumbing in general. I have decided a
25 gallon plastic tank will suffice and will fit through the loft hatch
but tackling the galvanised iron rising main, overflow and two outlets
is a bit daunting at present.

alan_m

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Sep 29, 2021, 4:52:19 AMSep 29
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On 23/09/2021 21:22, AJH wrote:
You should worry
My parents had a 30 year old galvanised tank expansion tank for CH in
the loft and over a period of a year the paper on the ceiling in one of
the bedrooms started to peel off. The cause was traced to the
galvanised tank that looked OK from the outside but appeared to be
slightly rusty on the inside. On removal it had a couple of pinholes
where the rust had eaten its way throug the tank. No catastrophic
failure but just enough water dripping to make the ceiling below
slightly damp.

--
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alan_m

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Sep 29, 2021, 4:58:34 AMSep 29
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My plastic cold water tank sits on top of the old galvanised tank.

I do find it strange that a purchaser of a house trusts a seller to do a
good job or to use good quality materials.
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