OT: Alternative to scaffolding?

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GB

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Mar 25, 2009, 7:24:32 AM3/25/09
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My son lives in a 6/7 storey block of flats. the exterior needs some work,
eg some spalling bricks removed, some minor concrete repairs. The estimated
cost of the repairs is Ł10k, whilst the scaffolding is estimated at over
Ł30k. Is there any alternative to scaffolding that is markedly cheaper? Are
cradles allowed these days? It wouldn't matter if the working costs were
doubled if the scaffolding costs could be reduced by half. It would still be
cheaper overall.

Dave Osborne

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Mar 25, 2009, 7:29:44 AM3/25/09
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GB wrote:
> My son lives in a 6/7 storey block of flats. the exterior needs some work,
> eg some spalling bricks removed, some minor concrete repairs. The estimated
> cost of the repairs is £10k, whilst the scaffolding is estimated at over
> £30k. Is there any alternative to scaffolding that is markedly cheaper? Are
> cradles allowed these days? It wouldn't matter if the working costs were
> doubled if the scaffolding costs could be reduced by half. It would still be
> cheaper overall.
>


http://www.nationwideplatforms.co.uk/products/machineselector.asp

fred

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Mar 25, 2009, 7:58:18 AM3/25/09
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In article <49ca1470$0$2519$da0f...@news.zen.co.uk>, GB
<NOTso...@microsoft.com> writes
Rope Access is a term worth googling for, should be ok for relatively
minor repairs. Brick replacement may cause problems due to difficulty in
gaining purchase to hack out the spalled ones.

Here's the UK trade association:
http://www.irata.org/
--
fred
BBC3, ITV2/3/4, channels going to the DOGs

GB

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Mar 25, 2009, 8:10:03 AM3/25/09
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fred wrote:
> In article <49ca1470$0$2519$da0f...@news.zen.co.uk>, GB
> <NOTso...@microsoft.com> writes
>> My son lives in a 6/7 storey block of flats. the exterior needs some
>> work, eg some spalling bricks removed, some minor concrete repairs.
>> The estimated cost of the repairs is £10k, whilst the scaffolding is
>> estimated at over £30k. Is there any alternative to scaffolding that

>> is markedly cheaper? Are cradles allowed these days? It wouldn't
>> matter if the working costs were doubled if the scaffolding costs
>> could be reduced by half. It would still be cheaper overall.
>>
> Rope Access is a term worth googling for, should be ok for relatively
> minor repairs. Brick replacement may cause problems due to difficulty
> in gaining purchase to hack out the spalled ones.
>
> Here's the UK trade association:
> http://www.irata.org/

It gives me vertigo just looking at those pictures. Is rope access better
than a cradle? Safer?

fred

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Mar 25, 2009, 10:14:34 AM3/25/09
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In article <49ca1f1a$0$16158$db0f...@news.zen.co.uk>, GB
<NOTso...@microsoft.com> writes
When you said cradle I mistakenly thought bosuns chair so jumped to rope
access. By cradle do you mean a cable suspended work platform such as
high building window cleaners use?

The benefit of pure rope access would be ease of setup and low equipment
cost but the cradle would make a more stable platform for more serious
work provided the roof was compatible.

I've seen both in use on a building of the height you describe with rope
access being used to test and mark damaged areas with repairs being made
from a suspended platform.

martin_p...@hotmail.com

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Mar 25, 2009, 1:29:40 PM3/25/09
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I've had the scaffolding dilemma before. Can anyone explain how the
price can be so high? How much does it cost the scaffolding company to
buy some metal poles? They presumably last roughly forever anyway. I
would assume that the whole thing is rigged, but it's a competitive
market like any other, so how do they keep prices so high?

Stuart Noble

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Mar 25, 2009, 3:16:07 PM3/25/09
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GB wrote:
> fred wrote:
>> In article <49ca1470$0$2519$da0f...@news.zen.co.uk>, GB
>> <NOTso...@microsoft.com> writes
>>> My son lives in a 6/7 storey block of flats. the exterior needs some
>>> work, eg some spalling bricks removed, some minor concrete repairs.
>>> The estimated cost of the repairs is Ł10k, whilst the scaffolding is
>>> estimated at over Ł30k. Is there any alternative to scaffolding that

>>> is markedly cheaper? Are cradles allowed these days? It wouldn't
>>> matter if the working costs were doubled if the scaffolding costs
>>> could be reduced by half. It would still be cheaper overall.
>>>
>> Rope Access is a term worth googling for, should be ok for relatively
>> minor repairs. Brick replacement may cause problems due to difficulty
>> in gaining purchase to hack out the spalled ones.
>>
>> Here's the UK trade association:
>> http://www.irata.org/
>
> It gives me vertigo just looking at those pictures. Is rope access better
> than a cradle? Safer?
>
>
>

Who does your son pay his annual maintenance charge to? If there's a
residents association, they can shop around for a better deal. If it's
jobbed out to a "property company", they may have you over a barrel,
both in terms of what needs doing, and the price each flat has to pay.

Dave Liquorice

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Mar 25, 2009, 3:55:47 PM3/25/09
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On Wed, 25 Mar 2009 10:29:40 -0700 (PDT), martin_p...@hotmail.com
wrote:

I should imagine a significant proportion of the charge is insurance. If
the scaffold collapses, landing on a few cars, maybe taking a bit of the
building or a neigboring one with it or even some people the damages that
the company would be liable for will quickly reach into the millions...

--
Cheers
Dave.

Clot

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Mar 25, 2009, 4:16:33 PM3/25/09
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Gordon Henderson

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Mar 25, 2009, 4:18:16 PM3/25/09
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In article <nyyfbegfubjuvyypb...@srv1.howhill.net>,

Driving into Exeter today - traffic was crawling and I was later told
it was due to some scaffoling collapsing - onto some cars!

Ah, looks like A dozen or so:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/7963616.stm

Oops.

Gordon

GB

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Mar 25, 2009, 5:11:15 PM3/25/09
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Stuart Noble wrote:

>
> Who does your son pay his annual maintenance charge to? If there's a
> residents association, they can shop around for a better deal. If it's
> jobbed out to a "property company", they may have you over a barrel,
> both in terms of what needs doing, and the price each flat has to pay.

The freehold's owned by the residents. This was just a surveyor's report,
but I wanted to try to understand why the scaffolding was estimated to be
roughly 75% of the total cost.

fred

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Mar 25, 2009, 6:06:07 PM3/25/09
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In article <49ca9df2$0$16163$db0f...@news.zen.co.uk>, GB
<NOTso...@microsoft.com> writes
Sometimes it's worth it, sometimes it isn't, these days I balance the
cost of my time in managing the sourcing of alternative quotes vs the
saving divided by the number of (usually indifferent) residents. Half
the time I walk away and pay the inflated cost / x as the easy option.

Depending on the number of residents in your son's place, it may be
worth it.

gunsmith

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Mar 26, 2009, 3:19:55 AM3/26/09
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Perhaps he should sell the flat pronto!
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