Wiki (new): Plasterboarding/drywalling

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Tim S

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Apr 10, 2009, 8:21:56 AM4/10/09
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Hi,

We don't seem to have a drywalling/plasterboarding Wiki and I've just done a
bit, so perhaps it's time:

I have limited experience of overboarding a knackered ceiling and some PB on
studwork, only with 9.5mm PB and drywall screws, all fixed to wood, so it's
going to be very specific! But, if anyone with other experience (especially
when to use other thicknesses of plasterboard, other fixing methods (eg
dot 'n' dab, metal studwork etc) want to add stuff, it would be great :)

Anyway - with no particular attention to formatting, overall layout, grammar
or spelling yet, here goes for a couple of sections:

It's a really rough draft and I did my first bit yesterday so hardly an
expert(!), if you think it's a load of old **** please say so.


Plasterboarding and Drywalling

<< Some sort of introduction, TBD>>

== Sizes and types ==

# Commonly available in sheet sizes of 2.4x1.2m, 1.8x0.9m and occasionally
1.2x0.6m.
# Thicknesses are typically 9mm and 12mm (with the odd 1/2mm added depending
on make).
# Finish is either plain paper or with a vapour barrier on one side
# Edge finish is either square or tapered.

Various combinations of the above are available.

<<Need examples of usage of various types, maybe stuff about Building Regs
requirements???>>
eg:
* For overboarding a ceiling, 9mm will generally be sufficient. 12mm is
better for walls where more rigidity is needed. << Would anyone ever use
19mm??? >>
* Unless you have help available, or access to props, it's easier to use the
smallest sheets you can get for ceiling work. 1.8x0.9 are hard enough for
two inexperienced people to manage on a ceiling. With 1.2x0.6m, single
handed working is more likely (remember you need one hand to hold the board
in place and one hand to screw the board up).
* 2.4x1.2m should be manageable on walls by one or two people and are better
if covering large areas as there will be less joints to tape, especially if
you are only going to paint the board rather than skim plastering it).

<< Something about taper edge vs plain edge, to do with type of finish >>

== Cutting plasterboard ==
There are three basic types of cut most commonly needed:

=== Straight cut across full board ===
* Used all the time when boarding large areas
* Very easy and clean to do.
# Place board across a couple of supports (eg sawhorses, workmates or even
lumps of timber or bricks if nothing else to hand). Be sure the board is
well supported near the new cut and stable.
# Mark the cut line
# Score through the cardboard layer on one side of the board with a sharp
stanley type knife. A couple of lighter strokes are better (and safer) than
applying serious pressure. Always work the knife away from your body and
hands - it's very easy for the knife to slip.
# Position the board so that one of the supports runs parallel and just
behind the score line.
# Put the knife away(!)
# Using both hands (better two people, if the cut is long, eg 2.4m board),
gently rotate the board edge downwards. The board should snap cleanly along
the scored line.
# The cut section of the board will continue to hang on the layer of
cardboard on the back. Do not attempt to rip by tearing the cut section
off - it will make a mess.
# Retrieve the knife and whilst supporting the cut section at 45-90 degrees,
simply cut through the remaining cardboard. The result should be a clean
straight edge, mostly square with almost no dust.
# If desired the edge may be cleaned up with sandpaper, a coarse file or a
coarse hand stone (this bit makes some mess).

=== Round hole ===

See section on holesaws

=== Fiddly cuts ===
* Generally you will need some sort of saw. A hacksaw blade in a suitable
holder will suffice for small works.
* For extended work or cutting square holes for lightswitches, proper
plasterboard saws are available, eg:
http://www.screwfix.com/prods/32237/Hand-Tools/Saws/Drywall-Saws/Drywall-Saw-6Tpi-6-152mm

=== Removing a rectangular section from a corner or edge can be done with a
combination of sawing and scoring for the final cut.

=== If you hate your lungs and neighbours ===

* Angle grinder

(Ok it's a joke!)

== Fixing plasterboard ==

=== To wood (eg ceilings and wooden studwork) ===

* The sheets may be screwed or nailed directly to the studwork or ceiling
rafters.

* For nailing, clout nails with a flat head are needed. Other nails will
pull through.

* For screwing, in principle, any countersunk wood screw would be
sufficient, proving it won't rust, through purpose made drywall screws
exist. These have a continuous thread and a very sharp point. On the end of
a small cordless electric screwdriver, these generally go in single handed,
quickly and securely. The heads will become "lost" in the surface of the
plasterboard.

* Be aware if you are screwing or nailing over an area with lo support (eg a
hole in the previous plasterboard that you are covering. The screws can
crack small sections of your new board especially near the edge.

* Apply edge screws as far from the edge as possible, preferably at least
2cm or there's a risk of the board cracking in localised spots. If it does,
don't worry: add an extra screw or two in the vincinity so the board is
supported. The cracked bit will generally be localised and won't matter if
over skimming with plaster. Otherwise, a bit of PVA and filler will
stabilise and repair it well enough.

* Put enough screws or nails in to support the board so it feels firm all
over. Every 40-50cm would be a reasonable gauge (<< Comments requested on
this??? >>>

=== To brickwork and old plaster ===

<< something about dot'n'dab >>

<< screws - is that even a good idea??? >>


It's too crap to stick up yet IMO but with some refinements it might get
there :)

Got a few photos available too...

Cheers

Tim


Rod

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Apr 10, 2009, 9:53:49 AM4/10/09
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This very day I passed by a boarded up shop in our local shopping
centre. And it has been totally covered by what appears to be
plasterboard - but with a dayglo pink surface (near-white core). Is this
a special type of PB?

--
Rod

Hypothyroidism is a seriously debilitating condition with an insidious
onset.
Although common it frequently goes undiagnosed.
<www.thyromind.info> <www.thyroiduk.org> <www.altsupportthyroid.org>

Tim S

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Apr 10, 2009, 9:58:02 AM4/10/09
to
Rod coughed up some electrons that declared:

> This very day I passed by a boarded up shop in our local shopping
> centre. And it has been totally covered by what appears to be
> plasterboard - but with a dayglo pink surface (near-white core). Is this
> a special type of PB?
>

I've seen something like that - not sure of the significance though...

Cheers

Tim

Franko

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Apr 10, 2009, 10:09:08 AM4/10/09
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"Rod" <poly...@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:7491biF...@mid.individual.net...

Pink is fireshield, a bit more retardent than standard plasterboard.
Blue is a soundblock board, rather denser than standard . . . . .bloody
heavy in 15mm form !
Green is a moistureshield board, used for areas of high humidity.

Colours vary between manufacturers between lighter and darker shades.

Franko.


Tim S

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Apr 10, 2009, 10:25:56 AM4/10/09
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Franko coughed up some electrons that declared:

> Pink is fireshield, a bit more retardent than standard plasterboard.
> Blue is a soundblock board, rather denser than standard . . . . .bloody
> heavy in 15mm form !
> Green is a moistureshield board, used for areas of high humidity.
>
> Colours vary between manufacturers between lighter and darker shades.
>
> Franko.

Mind if I steal that for the Wiki?

Cheers

Tim

Franko

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Apr 10, 2009, 10:31:50 AM4/10/09
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"Tim S" <t...@dionic.net> wrote in message
news:49df56f4$0$508$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk...

No problem at all Tim, better wait for others to confirm if it's correct
though - been off the tools for a while :-)

Franko.


meow...@care2.com

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Apr 10, 2009, 1:53:37 PM4/10/09
to
Tim S wrote:
> Hi,
>
> We don't seem to have a drywalling/plasterboarding Wiki and I've just done a
> bit, so perhaps it's time:
>
> I have limited experience of overboarding a knackered ceiling and some PB on
> studwork, only with 9.5mm PB and drywall screws, all fixed to wood, so it's
> going to be very specific! But, if anyone with other experience (especially
> when to use other thicknesses of plasterboard, other fixing methods (eg
> dot 'n' dab, metal studwork etc) want to add stuff, it would be great :)

Good to see more getting done. We have a PB aricle here:
http://www.wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Partition_Wall
and by chance, yours covers what that doesnt & vice versa. So I dont
know whether you want to make yours a separate article, or add new
sections into the older article. Actually... how about both? How about
making a standalone practical how-to article, which avoids going into
all the various options, just presents a how to make a standard wall,
and then putting all the complexities and choices into the existing
one? Just one idea anyway.

> Anyway - with no particular attention to formatting, overall layout, grammar
> or spelling yet, here goes for a couple of sections:
>
> It's a really rough draft and I did my first bit yesterday so hardly an
> expert(!), if you think it's a load of old **** please say so.
>
>
> Plasterboarding and Drywalling
>
> << Some sort of introduction, TBD>>

Plasterboard walls are very popular, as they're cheap, quick to build,
and fairly easy to do.


> == Sizes and types ==
>
> # Commonly available in sheet sizes of 2.4x1.2m, 1.8x0.9m and occasionally
> 1.2x0.6m.

4x8 being the main size used

> # Thicknesses are typically 9mm and 12mm (with the odd 1/2mm added depending
> on make).
> # Finish is either plain paper or with a vapour barrier on one side
> # Edge finish is either square or tapered.
>
> Various combinations of the above are available.
>
> <<Need examples of usage of various types, maybe stuff about Building Regs
> requirements???>>
> eg:
> * For overboarding a ceiling, 9mm will generally be sufficient. 12mm is
> better for walls where more rigidity is needed. << Would anyone ever use
> 19mm??? >>

9mm is very much the stuff to use for ceilings, 12 is unnecessary
weight.
9 is popular for walls too, but 12 is a fair bit tougher and very
little extra cost. More robust & less noise transmission.


> * Unless you have help available, or access to props, it's easier to use the
> smallest sheets you can get for ceiling work. 1.8x0.9 are hard enough for
> two inexperienced people to manage on a ceiling. With 1.2x0.6m, single
> handed working is more likely (remember you need one hand to hold the board
> in place and one hand to screw the board up).

Or support it with your head. Or use a prop. A prop for this work is
nothing more than a piece of 2x1 cut 1" longer than floor to ceiling
height. Just jam it in place to hold the PB.


> * 2.4x1.2m should be manageable on walls by one or two people and are better

1 person's no problem with 12mm 4x8 IME

> if covering large areas as there will be less joints to tape, especially if
> you are only going to paint the board rather than skim plastering it).
>
> << Something about taper edge vs plain edge, to do with type of finish >>

3 finishes:
paper taped
filled
skimmed

2 ways to cut:
- score & snap. Neat
- Saw. messy


> === Round hole ===
>
> See section on holesaws
>
> === Fiddly cuts ===
> * Generally you will need some sort of saw. A hacksaw blade in a suitable
> holder will suffice for small works.
> * For extended work or cutting square holes for lightswitches, proper
> plasterboard saws are available, eg:
> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/32237/Hand-Tools/Saws/Drywall-Saws/Drywall-Saw-6Tpi-6-152mm

You can do all that with a knife, but yes a saw's quicker


> === Removing a rectangular section from a corner or edge can be done with a
> combination of sawing and scoring for the final cut.
>
> === If you hate your lungs and neighbours ===
>
> * Angle grinder
>
> (Ok it's a joke!)
>
> == Fixing plasterboard ==
>
> === To wood (eg ceilings and wooden studwork) ===
>
> * The sheets may be screwed or nailed directly to the studwork or ceiling
> rafters.
>
> * For nailing, clout nails with a flat head are needed. Other nails will
> pull through.

PB nails should definitlely be avoided for that reason. Clouts would
look dreadful if not skimmed. Really, nailing pb just isnt a good
plan.


> * For screwing, in principle, any countersunk wood screw would be
> sufficient, proving it won't rust, through purpose made drywall screws
> exist.

noooo, ordinary coarse thread type screws make a disaster of PB. Try
it. The bugle shape of the PB screw is vital.


> These have a continuous thread and a very sharp point. On the end of
> a small cordless electric screwdriver, these generally go in single handed,
> quickly and securely. The heads will become "lost" in the surface of the
> plasterboard.

head depth matters. Set it so its flush, go any deeper and the paper
tears and the fixing is seriously weakened.


> * Be aware if you are screwing or nailing over an area with lo support (eg a
> hole in the previous plasterboard that you are covering. The screws can
> crack small sections of your new board especially near the edge.
>
> * Apply edge screws as far from the edge as possible, preferably at least
> 2cm or there's a risk of the board cracking in localised spots. If it does,

Dont think I've ever fixed that far away from the edge. 1/2" is about
the limit IME.


> don't worry: add an extra screw or two in the vincinity so the board is
> supported. The cracked bit will generally be localised and won't matter if
> over skimming with plaster. Otherwise, a bit of PVA and filler will
> stabilise and repair it well enough.

PVA is rarely used

> * Put enough screws or nails in to support the board so it feels firm all
> over. Every 40-50cm would be a reasonable gauge (<< Comments requested on
> this??? >>>

depends a lot on how youre finishing it off. Skim requires no
movement, so put them close. Paper tape finish is most movement
tolerant, and 50cm spacing would be ok.


> === To brickwork and old plaster ===
>
> << something about dot'n'dab >>
>
> << screws - is that even a good idea??? >>
>
>
> It's too crap to stick up yet IMO but with some refinements it might get
> there :)
>
> Got a few photos available too...
>
> Cheers
>
> Tim

neat

NT

Tim S

unread,
Apr 10, 2009, 2:32:26 PM4/10/09
to
meow...@care2.com coughed up some electrons that declared:

> Tim S wrote:
>> Hi,
>>
>> We don't seem to have a drywalling/plasterboarding Wiki and I've just
>> done a bit, so perhaps it's time:
>>
>> I have limited experience of overboarding a knackered ceiling and some PB
>> on studwork, only with 9.5mm PB and drywall screws, all fixed to wood, so
>> it's going to be very specific! But, if anyone with other experience
>> (especially when to use other thicknesses of plasterboard, other fixing
>> methods (eg dot 'n' dab, metal studwork etc) want to add stuff, it would
>> be great :)
>
> Good to see more getting done.

Indeed. Months (years?) ago I promised I'd do something in return for all
the excellent advice I got here. Now I'm actually doing stuff, I've got
something to say :)

Oh - maybe I'll stick soem links in then from "Drywall" to there.

> and by chance, yours covers what that doesnt & vice versa. So I dont
> know whether you want to make yours a separate article, or add new
> sections into the older article. Actually... how about both? How about
> making a standalone practical how-to article, which avoids going into
> all the various options, just presents a how to make a standard wall,
> and then putting all the complexities and choices into the existing
> one? Just one idea anyway.

Sounds like a plan - I'll look over the existing one and see how to fit
stuff in.



>> << Some sort of introduction, TBD>>
>
> Plasterboard walls are very popular, as they're cheap, quick to build,
> and fairly easy to do.

Excellent :)



>
>> == Sizes and types ==
>>
>> # Commonly available in sheet sizes of 2.4x1.2m, 1.8x0.9m and

>> # occasionally


>> 1.2x0.6m.
>
> 4x8 being the main size used

Good point

>
> 9mm is very much the stuff to use for ceilings, 12 is unnecessary
> weight.
> 9 is popular for walls too, but 12 is a fair bit tougher and very
> little extra cost. More robust & less noise transmission.

OK



>
>> * Unless you have help available, or access to props, it's easier to use
>> the smallest sheets you can get for ceiling work. 1.8x0.9 are hard enough
>> for two inexperienced people to manage on a ceiling. With 1.2x0.6m,
>> single handed working is more likely (remember you need one hand to hold
>> the board in place and one hand to screw the board up).
>
> Or support it with your head. Or use a prop. A prop for this work is
> nothing more than a piece of 2x1 cut 1" longer than floor to ceiling
> height. Just jam it in place to hold the PB.

That's a good thing to mention.



>
>> * 2.4x1.2m should be manageable on walls by one or two people and are
>> better
>
> 1 person's no problem with 12mm 4x8 IME
>
>> if covering large areas as there will be less joints to tape, especially
>> if you are only going to paint the board rather than skim plastering it).
>>
>> << Something about taper edge vs plain edge, to do with type of finish >>
>
> 3 finishes:
> paper taped
> filled
> skimmed

Which one requires taper board? Filled I assume? (I'm fairly certian, but
just to be sure)


>
> 2 ways to cut:
> - score & snap. Neat
> - Saw. messy

OK.



>
>> === Round hole ===
>>
>> See section on holesaws
>>
>> === Fiddly cuts ===
>> * Generally you will need some sort of saw. A hacksaw blade in a suitable
>> holder will suffice for small works.
>> * For extended work or cutting square holes for lightswitches, proper
>> plasterboard saws are available, eg:
>>
http://www.screwfix.com/prods/32237/Hand-Tools/Saws/Drywall-Saws/Drywall-Saw-6Tpi-6-152mm
>
> You can do all that with a knife, but yes a saw's quicker

That's true.



>
> PB nails should definitlely be avoided for that reason. Clouts would
> look dreadful if not skimmed. Really, nailing pb just isnt a good
> plan.

OK - I think anyway, these days, there's hardly any reason to both with
nails.



>
>> * For screwing, in principle, any countersunk wood screw would be
>> sufficient, proving it won't rust, through purpose made drywall screws
>> exist.
>
> noooo, ordinary coarse thread type screws make a disaster of PB. Try
> it. The bugle shape of the PB screw is vital.

OK - ta. Didn't actually try.

>
>> These have a continuous thread and a very sharp point. On the end of
>> a small cordless electric screwdriver, these generally go in single
>> handed, quickly and securely. The heads will become "lost" in the surface
>> of the plasterboard.
>
> head depth matters. Set it so its flush, go any deeper and the paper
> tears and the fixing is seriously weakened.

Good clarification. I was using one of those fancy PB screw bits and a
screwdriver with a torque limiter so I managed to avoid that problem.

>
>> * Be aware if you are screwing or nailing over an area with lo support
>> (eg a hole in the previous plasterboard that you are covering. The screws
>> can crack small sections of your new board especially near the edge.
>>
>> * Apply edge screws as far from the edge as possible, preferably at least
>> 2cm or there's a risk of the board cracking in localised spots. If it
>> does,
>
> Dont think I've ever fixed that far away from the edge. 1/2" is about
> the limit IME.

Something to do with the raggedy crap ceiling I was overboarding. There were
depressions and holes round the edge and it seemed rather easy to crack an
inch lump out of the board edge. I drove those screws in at an angle in the
end. 2mm head protrusion isn;t a problem for me as I'm skimming (later!).

>
>> don't worry: add an extra screw or two in the vincinity so the board is
>> supported. The cracked bit will generally be localised and won't matter
>> if over skimming with plaster. Otherwise, a bit of PVA and filler will
>> stabilise and repair it well enough.
>
> PVA is rarely used

I was thinkink if just painting - I would, to avoid having small wobbly
bits???...

>> * Put enough screws or nails in to support the board so it feels firm all
>> over. Every 40-50cm would be a reasonable gauge (<< Comments requested on
>> this??? >>>
>
> depends a lot on how youre finishing it off. Skim requires no
> movement, so put them close. Paper tape finish is most movement
> tolerant, and 50cm spacing would be ok.

That's good - mine are on a 30x50cm grid approx - thought I'd used too many.

Cheers

Tim

JDT2Q

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Apr 10, 2009, 6:09:08 PM4/10/09
to
Pasterboarding a ceiling.

When plasterboarding a high ceiling, and if the help of an assistant is
available, it's a good idea to make a T shaped support from 3x2's ( 3 x 4"
nails at joint for rigidity ) to support the other end of the board from
where you start screwing.

The horizontal part of the T should be a little narrower than the board used
and the vertical part of the T long enough to give support by the assistant
comfortably from the floor.

Having recently done a large 3 metre high ceiling in 1800x900x9mm
plasterboard I don't know how I would have coped without one.
20 or so years ago I did a lower cellar ceiling in 2400x1200x9 mm and I
think it would have been impossible without the T support.

General plasterboarding.

Just be aware when planning your studs and noggings that a national chain
with 2700x1200 board advertised on their website didn't actually do boards
of that size when I went to buy after the planning stage and it needed a
hasty replanning of the timber framing and the 2400x1200 sheets needed in
store at time of purchase. The store assistant said 'don't know why that's
on the website ( he looked while we were there ), we've never done sheets
that size' - but they are still on their website - checked tonight.
Of course they may have added them to their stocking list since but in
future I would always check availability of slightly odd sized boards before
planning the timberwork.

JD


Tim S

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Apr 10, 2009, 6:13:21 PM4/10/09
to
JDT2Q coughed up some electrons that declared:

Brilliant - thanks - I'll work it in if I may :)

Phil L

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Apr 10, 2009, 6:20:21 PM4/10/09
to
Tim S wrote:

> * Put enough screws or nails in to support the board so it feels firm
> all over. Every 40-50cm would be a reasonable gauge (<< Comments
> requested on this??? >>>

Obviously you are restricted when fixing to studding with regards to how far
apart the centres are, and so boards cannot be fixed where there is nothing
to screw into, but about 250mm (10in) apart is the norm along the joists -
that is to say, one at each edge about 25mm in, and then every 250mm.

>
> === To brickwork and old plaster ===
>
> << something about dot'n'dab >>

D&D is used on newbuild as well as old plaster and brickwork, certainly on
'thermalite' type blocks, the lightweight insulative ones are only really
fit to have D&D as most other plasters won't adhere - even dry lining
adhesive (DLA) will only stick to it once it's been damped down, indeed, all
surfaces to have D&D should be damped down but thermalite thoroughly due to
the high suction.

Mixing DLA is similar to mixing other plaster, except it's more sticky
obviously and it should be mixed slightly thicker if you are going over very
uneven surfaces, so that you can use huge blobs to get the board out to the
desired level, if you mix it too wet, you can't build it out thick enough.
Working time is normally 45mins, but it can last longer.

Make sure the wall to be lined is free from nails, screws and other
protusions and any old plaster is sound, flaky or loose plaster should be
removed, as should any old wallpaper, and painted surfaces should be scored
with a blade or scrabbler to form a key, and a coat of dilute (1:1) PVA and
water applied prior to work commencing - it doesn't matter if this is wet or
left to dry, brick or blockwork just requires wetting with plain water as
mentioned above.

Some people apply the DLA to the wall and others apply it to the back of the
board, personally I prefer to apply it to the wall because a board can get
very heavy with two dozen blobs of DLA on the back of it so I will describe
this method.

only apply the DLA to the part of the wall which is to be covered by one
board (you may need to measure) and using a gauger or small trowel apply
snowball sized blobs to the wall about every 12ins, try to keep the blobs
even because large ones will cause a bulge, while very small ones will
probably not touch the back of the board.
Once all the blobs are in place, offer the board to the wall, but remember
that if you are working on a bare wall, you will need some pieces of scrap
timber as spacers at the bottom so that the board is not in contact with the
floor, an inch or two is sufficient, this is assuming there is no skirting
board already in place. Once the board is in contact with the DLA, use a
spirit level (about 3 ft long if you have one) in all directions to make
sure the board is not bulging anywhere and then proceed with the blobs for
the next board, bearing in mind that on large walls, the joints should be
staggered in a similar way to brickwork, this is to avoid long straight
joints which are prone to cracking, even though you will still get a long
straight joint in one direction, there's no need for two!


>
> << screws - is that even a good idea??? >>

screwing PB is far better than nailing - ask any plasterer, with nails, they
tend to bounce out slightly when you knock adjacent nails in, this leaves a
small gap behind the board and when the plasterer is doing his thing, he
pushes the board in when he goes over it with a trowel full of plaster which
causes the nailhead to push the plaster out.
This is only usually visible when the plasterer is giving it the final
polish and the plaster has almost completely set and results in penny-sized
holes and much swearing.


>
>
> It's too crap to stick up yet IMO but with some refinements it might
> get there :)
>
> Got a few photos available too...
>
> Cheers
>
> Tim

--
Phil L
RSRL Tipster Of The Year 2008


Tim S

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Apr 10, 2009, 6:24:45 PM4/10/09
to
Phil L coughed up some electrons that declared:


Thanks Phil - that's a very concise writeup of dot'n'dab. I'll get that in
too (probably tomorrow now).

Cheers

Tim

JDT2Q

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Apr 10, 2009, 6:55:15 PM4/10/09
to
Of course you may - spread the knowledge.

JD

--
The eMail address used in newsgroups is invalid - reply to group only for me
to see.


"Tim S" <t...@dionic.net> wrote in message

news:49dfc481$0$510$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk...

Frank Erskine

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Apr 10, 2009, 7:21:40 PM4/10/09
to
On Fri, 10 Apr 2009 23:13:21 +0100, Tim S <t...@dionic.net> wrote:

>Brilliant - thanks - I'll work it in if I may :)

Fnarr fnarr...

--
Frank Erskine

John Rumm

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Apr 10, 2009, 11:10:24 PM4/10/09
to
Tim S wrote:

> Plasterboarding and Drywalling
>
> << Some sort of introduction, TBD>>
>
> == Sizes and types ==
>
> # Commonly available in sheet sizes of 2.4x1.2m, 1.8x0.9m and occasionally
> 1.2x0.6m.

(i would include notional imperial sizes here as well)

> # Thicknesses are typically 9mm and 12mm (with the odd 1/2mm added depending
> on make).

15mm is also available for special application - but rarely used.

> # Finish is either plain paper or with a vapour barrier on one side
> # Edge finish is either square or tapered.
>
> Various combinations of the above are available.
>
> <<Need examples of usage of various types, maybe stuff about Building Regs
> requirements???>>
> eg:
> * For overboarding a ceiling, 9mm will generally be sufficient. 12mm is
> better for walls where more rigidity is needed. << Would anyone ever use
> 19mm??? >>

Commercial shopfitters will typically use 2 layers of 12mm staggered on
600mm boundaries for dry lined walls.

12mm + skim is usually the minimum for a ceiling to have 30 min fire
protection - needed anywhere you add a third storey or over an integral
garage.

> * Unless you have help available, or access to props, it's easier to use the
> smallest sheets you can get for ceiling work. 1.8x0.9 are hard enough for
> two inexperienced people to manage on a ceiling. With 1.2x0.6m, single
> handed working is more likely (remember you need one hand to hold the board
> in place and one hand to screw the board up).

I did all my ceilings in 12mm single handed. All you need is a:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Dead_man_prop

> * 2.4x1.2m should be manageable on walls by one or two people and are better
> if covering large areas as there will be less joints to tape, especially if
> you are only going to paint the board rather than skim plastering it).
>
> << Something about taper edge vs plain edge, to do with type of finish >>

Taper is designed for filling and sanding rather than skimming...

I tend to do all my cuts with the board vertical. I use a metal straight
edge (long level typically), mark two points and align the level holding
the bottom o fit with my foot, and the top with one hand, then score
with the other. Now snap it by hitting it in the middle of the back of
the cut, and separate. All in all it takes less space, and less handling
of the board. You also are less liekly to damage a board getting in and
out of cutting positions.

> === Round hole ===
>
> See section on holesaws
>
> === Fiddly cuts ===
> * Generally you will need some sort of saw. A hacksaw blade in a suitable
> holder will suffice for small works.
> * For extended work or cutting square holes for lightswitches, proper
> plasterboard saws are available, eg:
> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/32237/Hand-Tools/Saws/Drywall-Saws/Drywall-Saw-6Tpi-6-152mm

Yup, one of those and a surform are very useful for fettling...

> === Removing a rectangular section from a corner or edge can be done with a
> combination of sawing and scoring for the final cut.
>
> === If you hate your lungs and neighbours ===
>
> * Angle grinder
>
> (Ok it's a joke!)
>
> == Fixing plasterboard ==
>
> === To wood (eg ceilings and wooden studwork) ===
>
> * The sheets may be screwed or nailed directly to the studwork or ceiling
> rafters.
>
> * For nailing, clout nails with a flat head are needed. Other nails will
> pull through.

Strictly speaking a clout nail is *not* the right type of nail for
plasterboard - although frequently is is used incorrectly.

The main problem with a clout nail is you cant lose the head.

A plasterboard nail is similar in profile to a drywall screw with a
bugle type head:

http://www.screwfix.com/prods/18050/Nails/Galvanised-Nails/Plasterboard-Nails-Galvanised-2-65-x-30mm-1kg-Pack


> * For screwing, in principle, any countersunk wood screw would be
> sufficient, proving it won't rust, through purpose made drywall screws
> exist. These have a continuous thread and a very sharp point. On the end of
> a small cordless electric screwdriver, these generally go in single handed,
> quickly and securely. The heads will become "lost" in the surface of the
> plasterboard.

Again, I would recommend strongly not using anything but the correct
screw. The bugle head is designed not to tear the paper.

> * Be aware if you are screwing or nailing over an area with lo support (eg a
> hole in the previous plasterboard that you are covering. The screws can
> crack small sections of your new board especially near the edge.
>
> * Apply edge screws as far from the edge as possible, preferably at least
> 2cm or there's a risk of the board cracking in localised spots. If it does,
> don't worry: add an extra screw or two in the vincinity so the board is
> supported. The cracked bit will generally be localised and won't matter if
> over skimming with plaster. Otherwise, a bit of PVA and filler will
> stabilise and repair it well enough.
>
> * Put enough screws or nails in to support the board so it feels firm all
> over. Every 40-50cm would be a reasonable gauge (<< Comments requested on
> this??? >>>

every 300mm or 12" is normal - so four across the width of a board.

> === To brickwork and old plaster ===
>
> << something about dot'n'dab >>

Can get special purpose PU foams for this these days as well.

--
Cheers,

John.

/=================================================================\
| Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
|-----------------------------------------------------------------|
| John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
\=================================================================/

John Rumm

unread,
Apr 10, 2009, 11:18:02 PM4/10/09
to
meow...@care2.com wrote:

> 9mm is very much the stuff to use for ceilings, 12 is unnecessary
> weight.

9mm if you are overboarding. 12mm really if you want any noise
insulation and fire resistance.

> 9 is popular for walls too, but 12 is a fair bit tougher and very
> little extra cost. More robust & less noise transmission.

9 is popular with very cheapskate builders!

>> * For nailing, clout nails with a flat head are needed. Other nails will
>> pull through.
>
> PB nails should definitlely be avoided for that reason. Clouts would
> look dreadful if not skimmed. Really, nailing pb just isnt a good
> plan.

A real PB nail is similar in head size to a PB screw - so no reason for
it not to hold as well if inserted carefully. Main problem is they can
work loose over time. Using a dry walling hammer with a wide slightly
convex face helps - far less likely to miss in the fist place, and it is
less likely to damage the board or leave a hammer head mark.

>> * For screwing, in principle, any countersunk wood screw would be
>> sufficient, proving it won't rust, through purpose made drywall screws
>> exist.
>
> noooo, ordinary coarse thread type screws make a disaster of PB. Try
> it. The bugle shape of the PB screw is vital.

Yup, and using the shrouded bits when power driving is also much much
easier. Just whack em in full speed with no thought about needing to
stop. The shroud pops the bit out of the head when the screw is set to
the right depth.

> head depth matters. Set it so its flush, go any deeper and the paper
> tears and the fixing is seriously weakened.
>
>
>> * Be aware if you are screwing or nailing over an area with lo support (eg a
>> hole in the previous plasterboard that you are covering. The screws can
>> crack small sections of your new board especially near the edge.
>>
>> * Apply edge screws as far from the edge as possible, preferably at least
>> 2cm or there's a risk of the board cracking in localised spots. If it does,
>
> Dont think I've ever fixed that far away from the edge. 1/2" is about
> the limit IME.

2cm will put you very close to the edge of your typical 50mm wide joist

John Rumm

unread,
Apr 10, 2009, 11:22:14 PM4/10/09
to
JDT2Q wrote:
> Pasterboarding a ceiling.
>
> When plasterboarding a high ceiling, and if the help of an assistant is
> available, it's a good idea to make a T shaped support from 3x2's ( 3 x 4"
> nails at joint for rigidity ) to support the other end of the board from
> where you start screwing.

I tend to make mine much lighter than that - typically from 2x1" PSE or
similar. That way you can spring it into place and adjust how hard it is
pushing.

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Dead_man_prop

> General plasterboarding.
>
> Just be aware when planning your studs and noggings that a national chain
> with 2700x1200 board advertised on their website didn't actually do boards
> of that size when I went to buy after the planning stage and it needed a
> hasty replanning of the timber framing and the 2400x1200 sheets needed in
> store at time of purchase. The store assistant said 'don't know why that's
> on the website ( he looked while we were there ), we've never done sheets
> that size' - but they are still on their website - checked tonight.
> Of course they may have added them to their stocking list since but in
> future I would always check availability of slightly odd sized boards before
> planning the timberwork.

Which outfit was this?

Rod

unread,
Apr 11, 2009, 3:58:44 AM4/11/09
to
Tim S wrote:
<>

Thanks for the answer, Franko.

And Tim, that was why I asked it there, hoping it would get into the wiki.

meow...@care2.com

unread,
Apr 11, 2009, 7:03:50 AM4/11/09
to
John Rumm wrote:
> meow...@care2.com wrote:
>
> > 9mm is very much the stuff to use for ceilings, 12 is unnecessary
> > weight.
>
> 9mm if you are overboarding. 12mm really if you want any noise
> insulation and fire resistance.
>
> > 9 is popular for walls too, but 12 is a fair bit tougher and very
> > little extra cost. More robust & less noise transmission.
>
> 9 is popular with very cheapskate builders!
>
> >> * For nailing, clout nails with a flat head are needed. Other nails will
> >> pull through.
> >
> > PB nails should definitlely be avoided for that reason. Clouts would
> > look dreadful if not skimmed. Really, nailing pb just isnt a good
> > plan.
>
> A real PB nail is similar in head size to a PB screw - so no reason for
> it not to hold as well if inserted carefully. Main problem is they can
> work loose over time.

When you hammer the nail, you're applying those shock forces to the PB
too, it weakens it locally, unlike when screwing. I tried PB nails
once, and it was impossible to get a proper firm fix, too much plaster
breakup. Screws are a joy by comparison.


> Using a dry walling hammer with a wide slightly
> convex face helps - far less likely to miss in the fist place, and it is
> less likely to damage the board or leave a hammer head mark.
>
> >> * For screwing, in principle, any countersunk wood screw would be
> >> sufficient, proving it won't rust, through purpose made drywall screws
> >> exist.
> >
> > noooo, ordinary coarse thread type screws make a disaster of PB. Try
> > it. The bugle shape of the PB screw is vital.
>
> Yup, and using the shrouded bits when power driving is also much much
> easier. Just whack em in full speed with no thought about needing to
> stop. The shroud pops the bit out of the head when the screw is set to
> the right depth.
>
> > head depth matters. Set it so its flush, go any deeper and the paper
> > tears and the fixing is seriously weakened.
> >
> >
> >> * Be aware if you are screwing or nailing over an area with lo support (eg a
> >> hole in the previous plasterboard that you are covering. The screws can
> >> crack small sections of your new board especially near the edge.
> >>
> >> * Apply edge screws as far from the edge as possible, preferably at least
> >> 2cm or there's a risk of the board cracking in localised spots. If it does,
> >
> > Dont think I've ever fixed that far away from the edge. 1/2" is about
> > the limit IME.
>
> 2cm will put you very close to the edge of your typical 50mm wide joist

You need that 2" width for the PB screws, if you try and use thinner
wood you'll run into trouble. 1" is usable as noggings, where you've
only got one screw.


NT

John Rumm

unread,
Apr 11, 2009, 10:10:49 AM4/11/09
to
meow...@care2.com wrote:

> When you hammer the nail, you're applying those shock forces to the PB
> too, it weakens it locally, unlike when screwing. I tried PB nails
> once, and it was impossible to get a proper firm fix, too much plaster
> breakup. Screws are a joy by comparison.

Agreed, screws are preferable and the way I always go. But if you must
nail, using the right ones helps!

Pete Verdon

unread,
Apr 11, 2009, 1:16:48 PM4/11/09
to
Franko wrote:

> Pink is fireshield, a bit more retardent than standard plasterboard.
> Blue is a soundblock board, rather denser than standard

> Green is a moistureshield board, used for areas of high humidity.

So if you want fire-resistant soundproofing you should look for purple
board? Or turquoise to keep out noise and water? Or perhaps all three
comes in rainbow stripes?

:-)

Pete

meow...@care2.com

unread,
Apr 11, 2009, 2:18:00 PM4/11/09
to

ha. The fire stuff has glass fibre in it, stops it disintegrating so
fast in a fire. I'd agree with advice to use 1" of PB when the cost
isnt a problem, the resulting performance is so much better.


NT

meow...@care2.com

unread,
Apr 11, 2009, 2:26:56 PM4/11/09
to
John Rumm wrote:
> Tim S wrote:

> > == Fixing plasterboard ==
> >
> > === To wood (eg ceilings and wooden studwork) ===
> >
> > * The sheets may be screwed or nailed directly to the studwork or ceiling
> > rafters.
> >
> > * For nailing, clout nails with a flat head are needed. Other nails will
> > pull through.
>
> Strictly speaking a clout nail is *not* the right type of nail for
> plasterboard - although frequently is is used incorrectly.
>
> The main problem with a clout nail is you cant lose the head.
>
> A plasterboard nail is similar in profile to a drywall screw with a
> bugle type head:
>
> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/18050/Nails/Galvanised-Nails/Plasterboard-Nails-Galvanised-2-65-x-30mm-1kg-Pack


A minor point here. PB nails, as shown there, don't have bugle heads,
and the heads are very much smaller than PB screws. The result is
terrible.


> Again, I would recommend strongly not using anything but the correct
> screw. The bugle head is designed not to tear the paper.

hear hear


NT

John Rumm

unread,
Apr 11, 2009, 2:37:12 PM4/11/09
to
meow...@care2.com wrote:
> John Rumm wrote:
>> Tim S wrote:
>
>>> == Fixing plasterboard ==
>>>
>>> === To wood (eg ceilings and wooden studwork) ===
>>>
>>> * The sheets may be screwed or nailed directly to the studwork or ceiling
>>> rafters.
>>>
>>> * For nailing, clout nails with a flat head are needed. Other nails will
>>> pull through.
>> Strictly speaking a clout nail is *not* the right type of nail for
>> plasterboard - although frequently is is used incorrectly.
>>
>> The main problem with a clout nail is you cant lose the head.
>>
>> A plasterboard nail is similar in profile to a drywall screw with a
>> bugle type head:
>>
>> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/18050/Nails/Galvanised-Nails/Plasterboard-Nails-Galvanised-2-65-x-30mm-1kg-Pack
>
>
> A minor point here. PB nails, as shown there, don't have bugle heads,
> and the heads are very much smaller than PB screws. The result is
> terrible.

Depends on your bugle I suppose ;-)

They are usable - but its harder work and takes more finesse that
screwing oddly.

Tim S

unread,
Apr 11, 2009, 5:57:39 PM4/11/09
to
meow...@care2.com coughed up some electrons that declared:

> John Rumm wrote:

>> 2cm will put you very close to the edge of your typical 50mm wide joist
>
> You need that 2" width for the PB screws, if you try and use thinner
> wood you'll run into trouble. 1" is usable as noggings, where you've
> only got one screw.
>
>
> NT

I looked again today... About 1/3 of the edge screws have cracked a small
lump. I'll admit it has much to do with the uneven crap it's being fixed
to.

However, the problem didn't show up fixing the same PB with the same screws,
same driver on the same torque setting to fresh flat studwork.

So I'll conclude that extra care is required when overboarding buggered
ceilings but fresh studwork is less likely an issue and screws 1cm from
edge are OK.

Does that seem good advice?

Cheers

Tim

PS - sorry - not going to do Wiki tonite.

Have a long day getting new consumer unit in place on new ply backing board
(wall wobbly), holes cut in ceiling for cables and pliable IP65 32mm
conduit installed into the meter box (no suitable through-wall route
available). Need shower, then stiff drink.

Starting to look good though. Isn't GRP plastic a bastard to holesaw with a
blunt holesaw? ;-> Still, a couple of tweaks and some conduit clips, feed
the tails through then I can book EDF for a fuse pull and transfer the
existing temp circuits over.

Daughter (5) helped a bit. She loves sanding random bits of wood. And
starting the screws off with a power driver (and a little help). I see a
stereotype being broken :)

Naturally she was ejected far away for the plasterboard cutting and meter
box drilling - only to discover our garden has a grasssnake - didn't see it
myself, but heard some loud hissing.

Tim S

unread,
Apr 11, 2009, 5:59:47 PM4/11/09
to
meow...@care2.com coughed up some electrons that declared:

> Pete Verdon wrote:

Glass Fibre? I bet that's right bastard to cut?...

Is it worth mentioning that two layers of thinner PB, with staggered joints
perform better in a fire than one thick layer or ordinary board (heard it
somewhere)?

meow...@care2.com

unread,
Apr 12, 2009, 6:51:08 AM4/12/09
to
Tim S wrote:
> meow...@care2.com coughed up some electrons that declared:
>
> > Pete Verdon wrote:
> >> Franko wrote:
> >>
> >> > Pink is fireshield, a bit more retardent than standard plasterboard.
> >> > Blue is a soundblock board, rather denser than standard
> >> > Green is a moistureshield board, used for areas of high humidity.
> >>
> >> So if you want fire-resistant soundproofing you should look for purple
> >> board? Or turquoise to keep out noise and water? Or perhaps all three
> >> comes in rainbow stripes?
> >>
> >> :-)
> >>
> >> Pete
> >
> > ha. The fire stuff has glass fibre in it, stops it disintegrating so
> > fast in a fire. I'd agree with advice to use 1" of PB when the cost
> > isnt a problem, the resulting performance is so much better.
> >
> >
> > NT
>
> Glass Fibre? I bet that's right bastard to cut?...

yeah, I've not tried it yet. IIRC its chopped fibre rather than mat.


> Is it worth mentioning that two layers of thinner PB, with staggered joints
> perform better in a fire than one thick layer or ordinary board (heard it
> somewhere)?

I think so.


NT

meow...@care2.com

unread,
Apr 12, 2009, 6:56:34 AM4/12/09
to
John Rumm wrote:
> meow...@care2.com wrote:
>
> > When you hammer the nail, you're applying those shock forces to the PB
> > too, it weakens it locally, unlike when screwing. I tried PB nails
> > once, and it was impossible to get a proper firm fix, too much plaster
> > breakup. Screws are a joy by comparison.
>
> Agreed, screws are preferable and the way I always go. But if you must
> nail, using the right ones helps!

When I used the 'right' ones, most of them were unable to grip the PB
enough to keep it still. The smallness of the heads, the pitch of the
head, and the inevitable fact that the PB would break up around them
meant that they just plain dont work acceptably. If someone must use
nails, I'd go with Tim's suggestion of clouts. Using the 'right' ones
is a pretty sure failure.


NT

John Rumm

unread,
Apr 12, 2009, 2:26:49 PM4/12/09
to

I have seen stuff nailed quite successfully (after all its the way the
yanks do lots of dry lining, and they dry line everything). Perhaps we
have been using different nails. The ones I used were very similar in
size to the screws - same head diameter and similar shape with a ring
nail body.

george (dicegeorge)

unread,
Apr 12, 2009, 4:13:22 PM4/12/09
to

>>> NT
>> Glass Fibre? I bet that's right bastard to cut?...
>
> yeah, I've not tried it yet. IIRC its chopped fibre rather than mat.
>
>

I cut some pink plasterboard with a saw a few weeks ago
(to cover a metal beam)
it seemed no different to cutting normal white plasterboard..

next time I will use a knife
which you say will make less dust.

[g]

Phil L

unread,
Apr 12, 2009, 4:37:55 PM4/12/09
to
george (dicegeorge) wrote:
>>>> NT
>>> Glass Fibre? I bet that's right bastard to cut?...
>>
>> yeah, I've not tried it yet. IIRC its chopped fibre rather than mat.
>>
>>
>
> I cut some pink plasterboard with a saw a few weeks ago
> (to cover a metal beam)
> it seemed no different to cutting normal white plasterboard..
>
It's reinforced with fibreglass strands


> next time I will use a knife
> which you say will make less dust.
>

Cutting with a stanley knife makes very little dust and a cleaner cut

george (dicegeorge)

unread,
Apr 12, 2009, 6:50:05 PM4/12/09
to

>
> Something to do with the raggedy crap ceiling I was overboarding. There were
> depressions and holes round the edge and it seemed rather easy to crack an
> inch lump out of the board edge.


my first bit of ceiling i did like this,
into the old oak timbers which were uneven,
and plasterboard had to be cut to all sorts of wierd sizes

much improved the second one
where I screwed battens to the oak,
(using a fantastic impact screwdriver which i learnt about on this group)
levelling them with each others using shims etc
such that a 4x8 plasterboard could go up in one piece
then a sawn off 4x8
then thinner bits to fill the gaps.

oh,
whats the difference between the white and grey sides of the plasterboard?

g

Tim S

unread,
Apr 12, 2009, 7:22:39 PM4/12/09
to
george (dicegeorge) coughed up some electrons that declared:

>
>>
>> Something to do with the raggedy crap ceiling I was overboarding. There
>> were depressions and holes round the edge and it seemed rather easy to
>> crack an inch lump out of the board edge.
>
>
> my first bit of ceiling i did like this,
> into the old oak timbers which were uneven,
> and plasterboard had to be cut to all sorts of wierd sizes
>
> much improved the second one
> where I screwed battens to the oak,
> (using a fantastic impact screwdriver which i learnt about on this group)
> levelling them with each others using shims etc
> such that a 4x8 plasterboard could go up in one piece
> then a sawn off 4x8
> then thinner bits to fill the gaps.

That's a good idea worth mentioning. Wouldn't help me, as I had to match a
previous overboarded section (the other side of a former wall) but a good
idea none the less.

> oh,
> whats the difference between the white and grey sides of the plasterboard?

Don't know, except I think it has to do with whether you're painting direct
or skimming it. Anyone care to clarify?

My 9mm new board only had AFAICS one usable side, where the paper was taken
round the edges. The other side had brown paper stuck on with loose edges,
which seemed to suggest it should go uppermost. Then those were square
edged, so I suspect they weren't designed to be painted.

Cheers

Tim

meow...@care2.com

unread,
Apr 12, 2009, 8:00:50 PM4/12/09
to
John Rumm wrote:
> meow...@care2.com wrote:
> > John Rumm wrote:
> >> meow...@care2.com wrote:
> >>
> >>> When you hammer the nail, you're applying those shock forces to the PB
> >>> too, it weakens it locally, unlike when screwing. I tried PB nails
> >>> once, and it was impossible to get a proper firm fix, too much plaster
> >>> breakup. Screws are a joy by comparison.
> >> Agreed, screws are preferable and the way I always go. But if you must
> >> nail, using the right ones helps!
> >
> > When I used the 'right' ones, most of them were unable to grip the PB
> > enough to keep it still. The smallness of the heads, the pitch of the
> > head, and the inevitable fact that the PB would break up around them
> > meant that they just plain dont work acceptably. If someone must use
> > nails, I'd go with Tim's suggestion of clouts. Using the 'right' ones
> > is a pretty sure failure.
>
> I have seen stuff nailed quite successfully (after all its the way the
> yanks do lots of dry lining, and they dry line everything). Perhaps we
> have been using different nails. The ones I used were very similar in
> size to the screws - same head diameter and similar shape with a ring
> nail body.

Those sound a lot more sensible. I had a feeling there might be
different things sold under the same name.


NT

John Rumm

unread,
Apr 12, 2009, 8:06:26 PM4/12/09
to
Tim S wrote:

>> whats the difference between the white and grey sides of the plasterboard?
>
> Don't know, except I think it has to do with whether you're painting direct
> or skimming it. Anyone care to clarify?

That used to be the case - it was designed to be skimmed one side or
decorated the other. These days however you always use the light side
for decoration or skimming. (instructions are usually printed on each board)

> My 9mm new board only had AFAICS one usable side, where the paper was taken
> round the edges. The other side had brown paper stuck on with loose edges,
> which seemed to suggest it should go uppermost. Then those were square
> edged, so I suspect they weren't designed to be painted.

They are all like that - saves making tow decent surfaces I suppose. The
brown side is often less flat than the finish side - look obliquely
along it and you can see some ripple.

Franko

unread,
Apr 13, 2009, 5:35:36 AM4/13/09
to

"george (dicegeorge)" <diceg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:grtr6r$1ic7$1...@energise.enta.net...

In the early days, the grey face was for skimming & the ivory face was for
taping & jointing.
i think nowadays, and with the use of multi finish plaster, that
manufacturers use an inferior quality of paper on the grey face and
stipulate that only the ivory face should be used for finishing.
Franko.


Rod

unread,
Apr 13, 2009, 5:43:01 AM4/13/09
to
I think another reason is that any imperfections/voids in filling
between the paper layers are on the grey side. And you do not want those
on the side being skimmed or decorated.

Jules

unread,
Apr 13, 2009, 9:44:09 AM4/13/09
to
On Sun, 12 Apr 2009 19:26:49 +0100, John Rumm wrote:
> I have seen stuff nailed quite successfully (after all its the way the
> yanks do lots of dry lining, and they dry line everything)

Common advice here (by professional yanks ;) is to never use nails for
drywalling - they have a tendency to work loose over the years, making a
mess of the finish as the nail head sticks up above the surface.

John Rumm

unread,
Apr 13, 2009, 11:09:48 AM4/13/09
to

I would agree with the advice -

You only need watch a few mins of a US TV program on the subject though
to spot people brandishing hammers!

george (dicegeorge)

unread,
Apr 13, 2009, 4:25:09 PM4/13/09
to

Whats the best way to repair old plasterboard
where the nails are working looose and showing up...

Screw it with plasterboard screws,
then bang the nails with some kind of a punch?

[g]

Andrew Gabriel

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Apr 13, 2009, 5:04:27 PM4/13/09
to
In article <gs0735$t4a$1...@energise.enta.net>,

"george (dicegeorge)" <diceg...@gmail.com> writes:
> Whats the best way to repair old plasterboard
> where the nails are working looose and showing up...
>
> Screw it with plasterboard screws,

Yes.

> then bang the nails with some kind of a punch?

No -- it's banging the wall in the first place that causes the
board to pull on the nails, popping the plaster on top of them.
If you hammer on the wall, you'll just spread the problem further.
Just remove the popped plaster from the nail tops, and fill it
again when you fill the screw head holes.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]

Phil Addison

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Apr 27, 2009, 12:23:34 PM4/27/09
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On Sat, 11 Apr 2009 19:37:12 +0100, in uk.d-i-y John Rumm
<see.my.s...@nowhere.null> wrote:

> meow...@care2.com wrote:
> > John Rumm wrote:
> >> Tim S wrote:
> >
> >>> == Fixing plasterboard ==
> >>>
> >>> === To wood (eg ceilings and wooden studwork) ===
> >>>
> >>> * The sheets may be screwed or nailed directly to the studwork or ceiling
> >>> rafters.
> >>>
> >>> * For nailing, clout nails with a flat head are needed. Other nails will
> >>> pull through.
> >> Strictly speaking a clout nail is *not* the right type of nail for
> >> plasterboard - although frequently is is used incorrectly.
> >>
> >> The main problem with a clout nail is you cant lose the head.
> >>
> >> A plasterboard nail is similar in profile to a drywall screw with a
> >> bugle type head:
> >>
> >> http://www.screwfix.com/prods/18050/Nails/Galvanised-Nails/Plasterboard-Nails-Galvanised-2-65-x-30mm-1kg-Pack
> >
> >
> > A minor point here. PB nails, as shown there, don't have bugle heads,
> > and the heads are very much smaller than PB screws. The result is
> > terrible.
>
> Depends on your bugle I suppose ;-)
>
> They are usable - but its harder work and takes more finesse that
> screwing oddly.

If you must (or have to) bang nails into studding, you will find the
whole wall shakes each time you bang it, and the hammer tends to bounce
off, making it a difficult task. Getting a mate to stand the other side
and hold a heavy lump hammer hard against the wall/studding opposite
where you are hammering reduces this problem considerably. Having said
that, bugle drywall screws are the way to go, but watch the points as
they are very sharp, so shake them out of the box rather than put your
fingers in to pull a few out <ouch!>.

Phil

meow...@care2.com

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Apr 27, 2009, 6:29:53 PM4/27/09
to

heh :) Thats one of those things I think everyone has to learn for
themselves.


NT

John Rumm

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Apr 27, 2009, 6:55:30 PM4/27/09
to

Another recommendation, don't allow 40mm drywall screws to fall into
your box of 25mm screws. So when you find yourself holding a small piece
of board against a slim batten while boxing in under some stairs, and
you load the driver with a screw without looking, and then whizz it in
at full tilt, you don't end up wondering 1) why that hurt, and 2) why
you now can't let go of the stairs. DAMHIKIJDO.

Tim S

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May 8, 2009, 7:02:28 AM5/8/09
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Finally...

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Plasterboarding

Sorry for the delay - been busy...

I've reviewed the entire original thread and I think I've got everything in.

I'm afraid I haven't attempted to sanitise this Wiki vs the Partition Wall
or Sheet Materials wiki.

To be honest, that was putting me off a bit (extra brainwork), so I decided
better to just get the information up at least, even with crossover.

Anyone who feels fit (or me if I ever get time) is of course free (it's a
Wiki!) to cut n paste bits around if it makes more sense to do so :)

Any final comments would be welcome (I've read it through, but I'm a daft
sod so might have missed a glaring pillockism), then I'll remove the
caution at the top.

Again, thanks for all your contributions.

Cheers

Tim

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