Experience of Lexmark printers?

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Chris

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Nov 15, 2021, 4:21:29 AM11/15/21
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After years of inkjet printers I'm diving into lasers and this Lexmark
printer ticks all the boxes: cheap, AIO and compact.
https://www.ukofficedirect.co.uk//product/lexmark-mc322dwe-colour-multifunction/kgj367?AFF=LIKGJ367&s=1

However, I'm not sure of how good the Mac compatibility is. They don't
provide any specific print drivers resorting to only supporting
AirPrint. I've not had good experience of only AirPrint support. The
Canon heap of junk that's just failed wouldn't do draft mode, for example.

So, what are people's experiences of Lexmark printers and Mac support
please?

Wolffan

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Nov 15, 2021, 7:30:45 AM11/15/21
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On 2021 Nov 15, Chris wrote
(in article <smt8qn$3cj$1...@dont-email.me>):
I last used a Lexmark about 15 years back. It was sufficiently horrid that
I’ve never gone near them since. They might have improved; I had a bad
enough experience to not want to see. I might have got a bad one; again, it
was so bad that I’d rather not give them a second try.

How bad was it?

1. the cartridge officially died in a very short time, under 1000 pages.

2. the cartridge still had toner. It just was, according to the printer,
empty.

3. greyscale images had problems. They were, amongst other things, blurry.

4. text was simply not as sharp as on other lasers.

5. the printer was noticeably slower to print text-only pages and _much_
slower to print images.

6. the printer was violently allergic to PDFs. See 3, 4, and 5 above.

7. the printer didn’t like PowerPoints. See 3, 4, and 5 above.

Other people’s milage may vary.

Andy Hewitt

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Nov 15, 2021, 11:26:57 AM11/15/21
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I'd never have another Lexmark, owned one years ago, and also had some
on a work environment, they were generally awful, poorly made, and very
high cartridge running costs. Of course things could have changed since
then.

As a rule, you'll find different brands can be favourable or not
depending on where you are in their cycles.

Canon are usually OK-ish, although I found the heads die just out of
warranty, and cost more than a new printer to replace.

HP can be hit and miss, I had a Business version a few years ago, which
was OK, but again the head went, and cost as much as a new printer.

Went with a Brother after that, an OK workhorse, but the waste ink tank
filled up (didn't even know it had one until the error came up), and was
a 'send back to Brother' job (tried the web based fixes, but didn't work
for me). You can't even buy these low cost models now though.

I bought a HP Envy Pro 6430 last year (from John Lewis, to get the free
extra warranty), on the Instant Ink subscription. We are light users,
and the £1.99/mth (50 pages with rollover for unused pages) plan is
perfect. Hardly notice the cost, and they send out new cartridges
automatically. Unlike the others, they get a new head built into the
cartridge, so we don't worry about the light user blockage syndrome.

It's been reliable and works well for printing, scanning and from any
device (iPhones, iMac and iPads) using airplay (it's not even connected
to anything directly).

--
Andy H

Graham J

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Nov 15, 2021, 12:48:19 PM11/15/21
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Andy Hewitt wrote:
> On 15/11/2021 09:21, Chris wrote:
>>
>> After years of inkjet printers I'm diving into lasers and this Lexmark
>> printer ticks all the boxes: cheap, AIO and compact.

[snip]

I've tried most makes of printer, and they are all universally awful.

Ink-jets are the normal recommendation for light-duty mono & colour
printing but I find that the heads block all too easily. The cheapest
versions solve that problem by having an integrated head + ink-tank, but
replacement ink can cost as much as a new printer. The more expensive
versions have separate heads and ink-tanks but they are not much better
in terms of reliability. Much depends on how much stuff you want to print.

So I suggest buying the cheapest possible printer and replacing it when
the ink runs out or the heads block. Not good for the environment, of
course!

For colour pictures it's probably better to take a memory stick to the
local supermarket and pay them to print with their properly set-up
commercial machine.

If your print volumes are that of a small business, a colleague in the
printer trade recommends a small colour laser such as the Ricoh SP C250SF.


--
Graham J

nospam

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Nov 15, 2021, 1:00:40 PM11/15/21
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In article <smu6h1$suv$1...@dont-email.me>, Graham J
<nob...@nowhere.co.uk> wrote:

> Ink-jets are the normal recommendation for light-duty mono & colour
> printing but I find that the heads block all too easily.

modern inkjet printers do not clog anywhere near as much as older ones

be sure to power off the printer from the printer itself (not a
switched outlet) when not in use so the heads properly park.

Ian McCall

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Nov 16, 2021, 3:40:55 AM11/16/21
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On 15 Nov 2021, Andy Hewitt wrote
(in article <smu1og$419$1...@dont-email.me>):

>
> I'd never have another Lexmark, owned one years ago, and also had some
> on a work environment, they were generally awful, poorly made, and very
> high cartridge running costs. Of course things could have changed since
> then.

I’day this opinion is likely more relevant than mine since it talk about
inkjets, but for a converse opinion I had one of their SC1275 colour lasers
for -yeears- and it was great. Reliable, maybe a bit slow but worked for ages
and to be honest still would have worked past its economical lifetime (second
time round of drum replacement).

Was great.

Cheers,
Ian


Liz Tuddenham

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Nov 16, 2021, 5:35:45 AM11/16/21
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Graham J <nob...@nowhere.co.uk> wrote:

> Andy Hewitt wrote:
> > On 15/11/2021 09:21, Chris wrote:
> >>
> >> After years of inkjet printers I'm diving into lasers and this Lexmark
> >> printer ticks all the boxes: cheap, AIO and compact.
>
> [snip]
>
> I've tried most makes of printer, and they are all universally awful.

[...]

I keep a Canon S520 as my standby printer. It was not the cheapest to
buy but has worked out a lot less expensive to run than many others.
(Nobody was doing rip-off cartridges because the price of the genuine
ones was already quite low.) A deep cleaning routine usually gets it
working OK after a long layup and the head is replaceable, although a
bit expensive. As inkjets go, it's one of the better ones.

By the way, the HP printers are sometimes re-badged Canons, so it might
be worth checking whether the Canon-badged version is cheaper or has
some of the features built-in, rather than charged as extras.


--
~ Liz Tuddenham ~
(Remove the ".invalid"s and add ".co.uk" to reply)
www.poppyrecords.co.uk

Andy Hewitt

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Nov 16, 2021, 5:20:26 PM11/16/21
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Oh dear, I'm sorry, I'd missed the point that this was about lasers.

However, I did use Lexmark Lasers in the work environment, and I do
remember them being troublesome - often, frustratingly, as you were
trying to print a customer invoice, and spend 10 minutes, or more,
battling to get a few sheets printed.

The best Laser I've owned was an old HP Laserjet 4100DTN workhorse I got
cheap off eBay, which went on for years printing a local church magazine
etc. It was easy to get parts for, and easy to self service.

The best inkjet I've owned is probably the current HP Envy I have now.
The worst was a Lexmark.

The best overall printer I've ever owned was an old Star LC24/200 dot
matrix jobby.

--
Andy H

Chris

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Nov 16, 2021, 5:48:22 PM11/16/21
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On 15/11/2021 09:21, Chris wrote:
>
Hmm. Not very favourable it seems.

That's very helpful all. Many thanks for the responses.

It looks like a cheap AIO colour laser is probably not a good option and
I can't really justify spending several hundred on a proper laser.

Andy's experience tallies with my previous HP inkjets I'd had - why did
I change to a shitty canon? - and I think I might just get another one.
I've never had drying ink problems and they both lasted nearly 10 years.

Decision made. Thanks again.

Martin S Taylor

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Nov 17, 2021, 5:36:34 AM11/17/21
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On Nov 16, 2021, Chris wrote
(in article <sn1cfk$9ij$1...@dont-email.me>):

> Andy's experience tallies with my previous HP inkjets I'd had - why did
> I change to a shitty canon?

I'm playing Devil's Advocate a bit, but I've always been very happy with
Canon, partly because Tasktron are just down the road from me and offer
superb customer service for Canon printers (only), repairing quickly and
efficiently when it's cost-effective, and advising on replacement when not.

MST
_______________________

CRC (Tasktron Limited)
Unit 3, Wintonlea, Monument Way West,
Woking, Surrey GU21 5EN

+44 1483 776060

Chris

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Nov 17, 2021, 6:32:14 AM11/17/21
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Martin S Taylor <corresp...@mRaErMtOiVnEsTtHaIySlor.com> wrote:
> On Nov 16, 2021, Chris wrote
> (in article <sn1cfk$9ij$1...@dont-email.me>):
>
>> Andy's experience tallies with my previous HP inkjets I'd had - why did
>> I change to a shitty canon?
>
> I'm playing Devil's Advocate a bit, but I've always been very happy with
> Canon, partly because Tasktron are just down the road from me and offer
> superb customer service for Canon printers (only), repairing quickly and
> efficiently when it's cost-effective, and advising on replacement when not.

Maybe lasers are fine, but this inkjet wasn't great from the start. Noisy,
slow, poorly designed, expensive ink (made worse by the lack of draft mode)
and unreliable. Apart from that it was great :)

Martin S Taylor

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Nov 17, 2021, 8:01:32 AM11/17/21
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On Nov 17, 2021, Chris wrote
(in article <sn2p7s$i62$1...@dont-email.me>):
Yep, that's what Tasktron told me.

They said it's important to get the *right* Canon (for the right price). I
spelt out what I needed and they said the TS8350 was perfect for me. On-line
from Amazon at £300. They said that was ridiculous, and I should be able to
get one for under £100 if I shopped around and was patient. It took me three
months, but I have one (£90) and it suits me to a T.

MST

Chris

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Nov 17, 2021, 9:45:26 AM11/17/21
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I got the TR7550 and I see that your model also has that flappy bit at
the front which I really don't like. It died after 26 months - looks and
sounds mechanical. Grr. Thanks for the input, nonetheless.

Martin S Taylor

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Nov 18, 2021, 11:28:53 AM11/18/21
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On Nov 17, 2021, Chris wrote
(in article <sn34i2$l2a$1...@dont-email.me>):

> I got the TR7550 and I see that your model also has that flappy bit at
> the front which I really don't like. It died after 26 months - looks and
> sounds mechanical. Grr. Thanks for the input, nonetheless.

Those are the two things I don't like about it either. We'll see if it lasts
more than 26 months. The previous one was an MP610, which was, to quote
Tasktron "built like a tank". The rear paper feed stopped working after about
eight years' service, and since I couldn't get a64-bit compatible driver for
it I decided it was time for a new one. It ticks all the boxes -
specifically, it will print on almost anything - CDs, A4 sheets of cardboard
or envelopes.

MST

Martin S Taylor

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Nov 18, 2021, 5:37:08 PM11/18/21
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Following on from Chris Ithinkiam's discussion of Canon printers, I have
noticed a couple of things about the scanner function on my TS8350 since I
upgraded to Monterey.

1. When I run the scanner through Image Capture, it appears as 'Shared', even
though it's connected directly to the iMac by a USB cable, and there is no
sharing enabled. It never did this under Mojave. (It's not a problem, but
when things change like this it does leave you with an uneasy feeling of not
quite being in control.)

2. The scanner won't work with Affinity Photo. It appears to scan as it
should, but the resulting file is distorted to the point of being useless. It
works properly with Image Capture and other software.

These are probably independent problems, but I wondered if anyone else had
noticed anything similar.

Martin S Taylor

Liz Tuddenham

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Nov 25, 2021, 1:03:04 PM11/25/21
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I've just had to repair a Canon Pixmar printer that had totally died;
the power supply unit had failed. It just clicks out from underneath
with no need to remove any panels, a replacement unit is less than £20.
That's a level of repairability that any user would welcome.

The cause of the failure was a short-circuit Schottky diode on the
secondary side of the transformer, they are £0.78 each but from Farnell,
with the minimum order of 5 units and handling charge, the total price
comes to £16.61
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