King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 1 of 9

0 views
Skip to first unread message

Internet Esquire

unread,
Apr 9, 2004, 7:57:50 AM4/9/04
to
Archive-name: ucdavis/king-hall-faq/part1
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Jun. 22, 1996
Version: 21Jun96 [ASCII/Multipart]
URL: <http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/ucdavis/
king-hall-faq/part1/faq.html >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 1 of 9
Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ (King Hall USENET FAQ) may be comprised
of more than one part. If it is, please see the TABLE OF CONTENTS in Part
One for a complete list of the questions that I have attempted to answer
and for other important legal information. Caveat emptor: I assume no
obligation to anyone through the publication of the King Hall USENET FAQ.
Furthermore, all versions of the King Hall USENET FAQ are my personal
property and are protected by applicable copyright laws. All rights are
reserved except as follows: I hereby give my permission to anyone who has
access to this version of the King Hall USENET FAQ to reproduce the
information contained herein for non-profit purposes, provided that proper
credit is given to me as the author of this FAQ and that I am promptly
notified of any use other than personal use. I may revoke permission to
reproduce any version of this FAQ at any time.

- - - - -
The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 1 of 9
Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996 by David F. Prenatt, Jr.


0) PREFATORY QUESTIONS

0.1) What is a FAQ?

A FAQ is an institution on the Internet, a file comprised of answers
to Frequently Asked Questions (abbreviated FAQ) that constitutes a
collective community memory.

0.2) Who wrote this FAQ and why?

This FAQ was written by me, David F. Prenatt, Jr., 1995 alumnus of the
University of California, Davis School of Law (King Hall). I wrote
this FAQ because I frequently encounter people who ask me questions
that arise out of my experiences as a former law student and graduate
of King Hall. However, I do not speak for the University of
California, Davis (U.C. Davis) or King Hall. My opinions are my own.

0.3) What information is contained in this FAQ?

The content of this FAQ is inherently unabridged. I am responsible to
no one for its content, and no topic is taboo. However, this FAQ is
intended to address subjects that are relevant to the members of the
King Hall community (i.e., "Things I'd Like to Share" or "TILTS"). In
my personal opinion, certain topics are inappropriate for this FAQ to
address, so where I think it is appropriate, I direct people to other
information resources.

0.4) How reliable is the information contained in this FAQ?

Caveat Emptor: The information contained in this FAQ is only as
reliable as I am. While I am usually willing to share information
when I am asked politely, I am under no obligation to save anyone from
his or her ignorance, and I have no desire to do so. Specifically, if
you need legal advice, you should consult a licensed attorney.

0.5) Can I make copies of this FAQ?

Yes (for non-profit purposes), and I encourage you to do so. However,
to protect yourself from legal liability, you should notify me of any
use that you make of this FAQ, personal or otherwise. Specifically,
if you fail to notify me promptly of any use that you make of this FAQ
other than your own personal use, any permission that I may have given
to you to reproduce any version of this FAQ is expressly revoked.
This FAQ is my personal property and is protected by applicable
international copyright laws. All of my rights under those laws are
expressly reserved, and the permission that I may have given to anyone
to reproduce the information contained in any version of this FAQ can
be revoked by me at any time. If you have any doubts about whether
your use of this FAQ is permissible under the law, you should consult
an attorney.

- - - - -

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 1 of 9
Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996 by David F. Prenatt, Jr.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

My sincerest thanks to Computer Specialist Steve Langford at King Hall
(<mailto:sdlan...@ucdavis.edu >) for his help with my computer needs
during my tenure as a law student at King Hall. Thanks also to the many
current students and alumni/alumnae of King Hall and the members of the
*.answers team who gave me feedback on the substance and form of this FAQ.
In addition, the following individuals helped make the King Hall USENET FAQ
possible:

* Deirdre Lynn Leiner, undergraduate alumna of U.C. Davis, who
helped me open my ez-account at U.C. Davis;

* Peter Nadan, my classmate at King Hall, who first told me about
the ucd.* USENET newsgroups (even though he doesn't remember
doing so);

* Joel Siegel(<mailto:jdsi...@ucdavis.edu >), my "grand-sib" and
colleague at King Hall, Class of 1997, who founded the USENET
newsgroup ucd.king-hall (<news:ucd.king-hall >);

* Russ Hersch, author of FAQs about FAQs, who inspired me to write
my own FAQs (even though he probably has no idea who I am);

* My father, David F. Prenatt (1931-1984), commonly known as Dave
Prenatt (one of the most brilliant systems analysts of all time),
and my mother, Shirley Prenatt, who helped both my father and me
to cope with success and failure.

- - - - -

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 1 of 9
Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996 by David F. Prenatt, Jr.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

* Part One *


0) PREFATORY QUESTIONS

0.1) What is a FAQ?
0.2) Who wrote this FAQ and why?
0.3) What information is contained in this FAQ?
0.4) How reliable is the information contained in this FAQ?
0.5) Can I make copies of this FAQ?

-- ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

-- TABLE OF CONTENTS


* Part Two *

1) ABOUT THIS FAQ.

1.1) Who wrote this FAQ and how can I reach him?[Rev]
1.2) What information is contained in this FAQ?
1.3) How is this FAQ organized?
1.4) How can I obtain this FAQ?
1.5) Are there any other FAQs available by the author of this FAQ?
[Rev]

2) PREPARING FOR LAW SCHOOL.

2.1) What should I do to prepare for law school?
2.1.1) What sort of academic preparation is required for law
school?
2.1.1.1) What undergraduate program should someone pursue
if he or she plans to go to law school?
2.1.1.2) Aren't political science majors better prepared
for law school than other college graduates?
2.1.1.3) Wouldn't someone who studied a challenging
undergraduate major be better qualified to study
the law than someone who studied underwater basket
weaving?

2.1.2) What else should I do to prepare for law school?
2.1.2.1) What type of work experience best prepares someone
for law school?
2.1.2.2) What other kinds of experience prepare someone for
law school?

2.2) How do I know if I'm ready for law school?
2.2.1) What if I don't know why I want to go to law school?
2.2.2) What if I am too old to go to law school?

3) APPLYING TO LAW SCHOOL.

3.1) To which law school(s) should I submit (an) application(s)?
3.2) What do I need to do to apply to law school?
3.2.1) Who should I get to give me references for law school?
3.2.2) What should I include in my personal statement for my law
school application?
3.2.3) How does the LSDAS work?
3.2.4) How do I increase my chances of doing well on the LSAT?
3.2.5) How do I apply for financial aid in law school?
3.2.6) How do I decide upon which law school to attend if I am
admitted to more than one?

3.3) How do I apply for admission to King Hall?
3.4) How do I apply for financial aid at King Hall?
3.5) Where can I get more information about law school?
3.6) What sort of educational programs do law schools offer? [Rev]
3.7) Can I transfer to King Hall from another law school?


* Part Three *

4) LIFE AS A LAW STUDENT AT KING HALL.

4.1) THE FIRST YEAR OF LAW SCHOOL AT KING HALL.

4.1.1) Where should I live during my first year at King Hall?
4.1.1.1) Should I move into the graduate dorms at U.C.
Davis, Lysle Leach Hall?
4.1.1.2) Where else can I live during my first year at King
Hall?
4.1.1.3) Is there any place to live on campus other than
Leach Hall?

4.1.2) FIRST YEAR COURSES AT KING HALL.

4.1.2.1) What courses are offered during the first year of
law school at King Hall?
4.1.2.2) How should I prepare for my classes?
4.1.2.3) Should I brief my cases to prepare for my classes?
4.1.2.4) Should I use commercial outlines and canned
briefs?
4.1.2.5) Should I use "Hornbooks" to prepare for class?
4.1.2.6) Should I participate in class?
4.1.2.7) How important are final exams in law school?
4.1.2.7.1) What is the format of final exams?
4.1.2.7.2) Can I type my essay exams?
4.1.2.7.3) How do I go about typing my essay exams?
4.1.2.7.4) Can I use a word processor on my essay
exams?

4.1.2.8) How important are first year grades in law school?
4.1.2.8.1) When will I find out what my grades are?
4.1.2.8.2) How can I find out what my grades are?
4.1.2.8.3) What if I think there has been a mistake in
the grades that were issued to me?
4.1.2.8.4) What is the American Jurisprudence Award?


* Part Four *

4.1.2.9) How important are the courses in Legal Research
and Legal Writing? [Rev]
4.1.2.10) What if I decide that I don't want to go to law
school anymore?
4.1.2.11) Can I repeat my courses?
4.1.2.12) Should I complain if I am unhappy with my
instructor?

4.1.3) OTHER THINGS TO CONSIDER AS A FIRST YEAR LAW STUDENT.

4.1.3.1) Registration with the Committee of Bar Examiners.
4.1.3.2) Where should I buy my books and supplies?
4.1.3.2.1) Should I sign up for a bar review course
during my first year of law school?
4.1.3.2.2) Which bar review course should I purchase?

4.1.3.3) FINDING SUMMER WORK.

4.1.3.3.1) How do I find summer work?
4.1.3.3.2) What if I can't find paid work?
4.1.3.3.3) Are there any career planning resources on
the Internet? [New]

4.1.3.4) SOCIAL LIFE AT KING HALL.

4.1.3.4.1) Is it a bad idea to date other law
students?
4.1.3.4.2) How do I avoid gossip at King Hall?
4.1.3.4.3) What do I do if people spread a vicious
rumor about me that is untrue?
4.1.3.4.4) What should I do if I experience some form
of harassment at King Hall, sexual or
otherwise?
4.1.3.4.5) What do One Ls do for fun?


4.1.3.5) MOOT COURT.

4.1.3.5.1) Moot Court Clerking.
4.1.3.5.2) Moot Court Team Tryouts.


* Part Five *

4.2) THE SECOND YEAR OF LAW SCHOOL AT KING HALL.

4.2.1) ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS (OCI).

4.2.1.1) What is OCI?
4.2.1.2) Should I participate in OCI?
4.2.1.3) What alternatives are there to OCI? [Rev]
4.2.1.4) What are call-back interviews?

4.2.2) JUDICIAL CLERKSHIPS.

4.2.2.1) What is a judicial clerkship?
4.2.2.2) How do I apply for a judicial clerkship?

4.2.3) SECOND AND THIRD YEAR COURSES AT KING HALL.

4.2.3.1) LAW REVIEW AND MOOT COURT.

4.2.3.1.1) Should I do Law Review or Moot Court?

4.2.3.1.1.1) Which program is better, Law Review
or Moot Court?
4.2.3.1.1.2) Can I do both Law Review and Moot
Court?

4.2.3.1.2) What sort of demands upon my time should I
expect from Law Review?
4.2.3.1.2.1) How do I become a Law Review Member?
4.2.3.1.2.1.1) How do I pick a good topic
for my law review article?
4.2.3.1.2.1.2) Isn't the "cynic's choice"
method of finding a law
review topic somehow . . .
dishonest?

4.2.3.1.2.2) How do I become a Law Review Editor?
4.2.3.1.2.3) What happens after I become a Law
Review Editor?
4.2.3.1.2.4) What happens if I am not recommended
to become a Law Review Member or
Editor?
4.2.3.1.2.5) Why should I do Law Review?

4.2.3.1.3) What is Moot Court?
4.2.3.1.3.1) Why should I do Moot Court?
4.2.3.1.3.2) What should I expect from Moot
Court?
4.2.3.1.3.3) How do I qualify for a Moot Court
team?
4.2.3.1.3.4) What is the Moot Court Board?

4.2.3.2) THE ADVANCED WRITING REQUIREMENT.

4.2.3.3) CLINICALS.

4.2.3.3.1) Should I take a clinical? [Rev]
4.2.3.3.2) What clinicals are available at King Hall?

4.2.3.4) PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY.

4.2.3.4.1) When should I take the required course in
Professional Responsibility?
4.2.3.4.2) When should I take the Multistate
Professional Responsibility Exam (MPRE)?

4.2.3.5) Should I try to become a Course Tutor or Teacher's
Assistant (TA)?
4.2.3.5.1) What is the difference between a Course
Tutor and a TA?
4.2.3.5.2) What are the qualifications necessary to
become a Course Tutor or TA?

4.2.3.6) OTHER COURSES.

4.2.3.7) SPECIAL PROGRAMS.

4.2.3.7.1) JOINT DEGREE PROGRAMS.

4.2.3.7.2) TAKING COURSES OUTSIDE OF KING HALL FOR
CREDIT TOWARDS THE JURIS DOCTOR.

4.2.3.7.2.1) Can I take courses in other
departments of U.C. Davis towards
and get credit towards my law degree
at King Hall?
4.2.3.7.2.2) Can I take courses at other
colleges, universities, or law
schools for credit towards the Juris
Doctor at King Hall?

4.2.4) COMPLETING THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE BAR.


* Part Six *

4.3) THE THIRD YEAR OF LAW SCHOOL AT KING HALL.

4.3.1) Why is there a third year of law school?
4.3.2) What does one do during the third year of law school?

4.4) LAW STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS.

4.5) SERVICES AVAILABLE TO KING HALL STUDENTS.

4.5.1) SERVICES AVAILABLE TO LAW STUDENTS THROUGH KING HALL.

4.5.1.1) LIBRARY SERVICES AT KING HALL.

4.5.1.1.1) What library services are available to law
students at King Hall?
4.5.1.1.2) What should I do if I encounter trespassers
after hours in the library at King Hall?

4.5.1.2) Financial Aid.
4.5.1.3) Career Services. [Rev]
4.5.1.4) The Perfect Tender Infant Care Co-op.
4.5.1.5) Computer Services at King Hall.
4.5.1.6) Food at King Hall.

4.5.2) SERVICES AVAILABLE TO LAW STUDENTS THROUGH U.C. DAVIS.

4.6) OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST TO KING HALL STUDENTS.

4.6.1) SPECIAL EVENTS AT KING HALL. [Rev]

4.6.2) INFORMATION ON KING HALL STUDENTS, FACULTY, STAFF, AND
ALUMNI.

4.6.2.1) The King Hall Counselor.
4.6.2.2) The UC Davis Annual Fund/STUDENTS FIRST Campaign.
4.6.2.3) King Hall Faculty on the World Wide Web.
4.6.2.4) King Hall Law Students on the World Wide Web.

4.6.3) LAW SCHOOL STUDENT PUBLICATIONS.

4.6.4) THE ORDER OF THE COIF.

4.6.5) CAREER PLANNING RESOURCES ON THE INTERNET. [Rev]


* Part Seven *

5) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT LIFE AT U.C. DAVIS FROM MEMBERS OF THE
KING HALL COMMUNITY.

5.1) Where can I get something to eat on or near the U.C. Davis
campus?
5.1.1) What kind of food can I get at the Silo?
5.1.2) What kind of food can I get at the Coffee House?

5.2) What sort of activities are there on the U.C. Davis campus?

5.3) SPECIAL EVENTS ON THE U.C. DAVIS CAMPUS.

5.3.1) Picnic Day.
5.3.2) The Whole Earth Festival.

6) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT LIFE IN DAVIS FROM THE MEMBERS OF THE
KING HALL COMMUNITY.

6.1) How can I find a place to live in Davis?
6.2) Where can I get something to eat in Davis?
6.3) What sort of entertainment is there in Davis?
6.4) What sort of transportation services are available in Davis?

6.4.1) How far is the airport from Davis and how do I get there?
6.4.1.1) Where should I park at the Sacramento Metropolitan
Airport?
6.4.1.2) Is there a shuttle service from Davis to the
Sacramento Metropolitan Airport?
6.4.1.3) Where can I get more information about the
Sacramento Metropolitan Airport?

6.4.2) Are there any shuttle services for commuters from
outlying areas?

6.4.3) Amtrak. [Rev]

6.5) LOCAL DAVIS BUSINESSES.

6.5.1) Is there an honest auto mechanic in Davis?
6.5.2) What banks serve the Davis area?
6.5.3) Where can I find a bike shop in Davis?

6.6) LOCAL POLITICS.

6.6.1) Davis, California = No smoking zone.
6.6.2) Davis, California = No snoring zone.
6.6.3) Davis, California = No malling zone.

6.7) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE SMALL COMMUNITIES
NEIGHBORING DAVIS FROM MEMBERS OF THE KING HALL COMMUNITY.

7) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE GREATER SACRAMENTO AREA FROM
MEMBERS OF THE KING HALL COMMUNITY.

7.1) What reasons would a member of the King Hall community have to
visit the Greater Sacramento Area?
7.2) How do I get to Sacramento from U.C. Davis?

8) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT NORTHERN CALIFORNIA FROM MEMBERS OF
THE KING HALL COMMUNITY.

8.1) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT WINE COUNTRY FROM MEMBERS OF
THE KING HALL COMMUNITY.

8.1.1) What reasons would a member of the King Hall community
have to visit Wine Country?
8.1.2) How do I get to Wine Country from Davis?

8.2) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA FROM
MEMBERS OF THE KING HALL COMMUNITY.

8.2.1) What reasons would a member of the King Hall community
have to visit the San Francisco Bay Area?
8.2.2) How do I get to the San Francisco Bay Area from Davis?

8.3) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT LAKE TAHOE FROM MEMBERS OF THE
KING HALL COMMUNITY.

8.3.1) What reasons would a member of the King Hall community
have for visiting Lake Tahoe?
8.3.2) How do I get to Lake Tahoe from U.C. Davis?

8.4) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT MISCELLANEOUS LOCATIONS IN THE
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA AREA BY MEMBERS OF THE KING HALL COMMUNITY.

8.4.1) Are there any other places of interest in Northern
California besides the ones you have listed?
8.4.2) How can I get more information on these other places of
interest?

9) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT LIFE IN CALIFORNIA FROM MEMBERS OF THE
KING HALL COMMUNITY.

9.1) How do I become a California resident?
9.2) What places of interest are there in California?


* Part Eight *

10) LIFE AFTER KING HALL.

10.1) ADMISSION TO THE CALIFORNIA STATE BAR.

10.1.1) THE CALIFORNIA BAR EXAM.

10.1.1.1) Qualifying for the Bar Exam.
10.1.1.2) Submitting an Application to Take the Bar Exam.
10.1.1.3) Preparing for the Bar Exam.
10.1.1.4) Taking the Bar Exam.
10.1.1.5) Waiting for Your Results from the California Bar
Exam.
10.1.1.6) Post Mortem on the Results of the California Bar
Exam.
10.1.1.7) Information for Unsuccessful Applicants.

10.1.2) THE MULTISTATE PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY EXAM (MPRE).

10.1.2.1) Submitting an Application for the MPRE.
10.1.2.2) Preparing for the MPRE.
10.1.2.3) Taking the MPRE.

10.1.3) THE MORAL CHARACTER EVALUATION.

10.2) EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES AFTER LAW SCHOOL.

10.3) LIFE AS AN ATTORNEY.

11) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT COMPUTERS AND LIFE ON THE INTERNET
FROM MEMBERS OF THE KING HALL COMMUNITY.

11.1) BASIC QUESTIONS ABOUT COMPUTERS.

11.1.1) Why should I use a computer?
11.1.1.1) Do I really need to use a computer?
11.1.1.2) Isn't it difficult to learn how to use a
computer?
11.1.1.3) How can I get the computer training that I need?
11.1.1.4) What practical uses would I have for a computer
as a law student?

11.1.2) Do I need my own computer?
11.1.2.1) What kind of computer should I buy?
11.1.2.1.1) What is the difference between a
Macintosh(r) and an IBM/IBM Clone (PC)?
11.1.2.1.2) What is an IBM/IBM Clone (PC)?

11.1.2.2) What kind of features should I have on a
computer?
11.1.2.3) What kind of accessories should I get on my
computer?


* Part Nine *

11.2) What computer facilities are available to law students at U.C.
Davis?
11.2.1) How do I obtain access to the computer facilities at
U.C. Davis?
11.2.2) Will I lose access to computer services at U.C. Davis
after I graduate? [Rev]
11.2.3) What should I do to make sure that I still have access
to computer services at U.C. Davis after I graduate?

11.3) What is the Internet?
11.3.1) How can I obtain access to the Internet?
11.3.1.1) How do I obtain access to the Internet from King
Hall?
11.3.1.2) How do I obtain access to the Internet from one
of the computer rooms on the U.C. Davis campus?
11.3.1.3) How do I obtain access to the Internet from my
home computer?

11.3.2) How do I communicate with other people on the Internet?
11.3.2.1) Are there any rules for e-mail and the USENET
newsgroups?
11.3.2.2) What is the difference between e-mail and the
USENET newsgroups?
11.3.2.2.1) How do I use e-mail?
11.3.2.2.2) How do I access the USENET newsgroups?
11.3.2.2.2.1) How many USENET newsgroups are
there?
11.3.2.2.2.2) How do I figure out which USENET
newsgroups I want to read?
11.3.2.2.2.3) Which USENET newsgroups are of
interest to members of the King
Hall community?
11.3.2.2.2.3.1) What regional domains are
available through the U.C.
Davis USENET?
11.3.2.2.2.3.2) Does King Hall have its own
USENET newsgroup?

11.3.2.3) How do I use the IRC?
11.3.2.4) How do I access the World Wide Web?
11.3.2.4.1) How do I use lynx?
11.3.2.4.2) How do I use Netscape?

11.3.3) What other resources are available over the Internet?
11.3.3.1) What is ftp and how does it work?
11.3.3.1.1) How do I use anonymous ftp?
11.3.3.1.2) How do I use privileged ftp?
11.3.3.1.3) How can I find out what files are
available via ftp?
11.3.3.1.3.1) What is a gopher?
11.3.3.1.3.2) Who (or what) is/are Veronica and
Jughead?
11.3.3.1.3.3) Who (or what) is Archie?

11.3.3.1.4) How do I obtain ftp files by e-mail
request?
11.3.3.1.5) How do I transfer files to and from my
personal computer and my Internet account?

11.3.3.2) What legal resources are available on the
Internet?

11.4) ISSUES ARISING FROM THE USE OF PERSONAL COMPUTERS AT KING HALL.

12) REVISIONS FOR FUTURE VERSIONS OF THIS FAQ.

12.1) CHANGES IN THIS VERSION OF THE KING HALL USENET FAQ FROM
PREVIOUS VERSIONS.

12.2) CHANGES THAT WILL TAKE PLACE IN FUTURE VERSIONS OF THIS FAQ.

- - - - -

End of document:

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 1 of 9
Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >


Link to next document:

<http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part2.html >

- - - - -

Internet Esquire

unread,
Apr 9, 2004, 7:57:52 AM4/9/04
to
Archive-name: ucdavis/king-hall-faq/part3

Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Jun. 22, 1996
Version: 21Jun96 [ASCII/Multipart]
URL: <http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/ucdavis/
king-hall-faq/part3/faq.html >
Ebb: <http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part2.html >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 3 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ (King Hall USENET FAQ) may be comprised
of more than one part. If it is, please see the TABLE OF CONTENTS in Part

One for a complete list of the questions that have attempted to answer and


for other important legal information. Caveat emptor: I assume no
obligation to anyone through the publication of the King Hall USENET FAQ.
Furthermore, all versions of the King Hall USENET FAQ are my personal
property and are protected by applicable copyright laws. All rights are
reserved except as follows: I hereby give my permission to anyone who has
access to this version of the King Hall USENET FAQ to reproduce the
information contained herein for non-profit purposes, provided that proper
credit is given to me as the author of this FAQ and that I am promptly
notified of any use other than personal use. I may revoke permission to
reproduce any version of this FAQ at any time.

- - - - -

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 3 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996 by David F. Prenatt, Jr.

4) LIFE AS A LAW STUDENT AT KING HALL.

4.1) THE FIRST YEAR OF LAW SCHOOL AT KING HALL.

Shortly after the August 13, 1995 publication of this FAQ, a first
year law student (One L) at King Hall asserted in a a post on the
ucd.king-hall USENET newsgroup (<news:ucd.king-hall >) that this FAQ
was "not terribly accurate." I inquired via e-mail for some
specifics, but none were forthcoming. A second year law student (Two
L) then criticized this FAQ as "unnecessary," and another Two L jumped
on the bandwagon, telling One Ls to ignore this FAQ because first year
law school experiences are personal ones (adding a gratuitous slam
against me as an alumnus who continues to post on the ucd.king-hall
newsgroup). I reluctantly address these unfair characterizations at
the request of the people who have offered their support to me via e-
mail and in person.
While I have been given permission to quote the students, staff,
and faculty who have offered their personal endorsement of this FAQ, I
respectfully decline to do so. The merits of this FAQ will speak for
themselves, and any inaccuracies in this FAQ will be addressed and/or
corrected if they are brought to my attention as the FAQ maintainer
(which was not done by the One L critic whom I mentioned above).
However, the opinions that I express typically do *NOT* reflect
traditional wisdom. Rather, they reflect the truth as I see it.
In presenting the truth as I see it, I discuss many topics in
this FAQ that are not covered anywhere else by anyone else. Indeed, I
discuss topics that cannot be discussed by official spokespersons of
King Hall and/or U.C. Davis, and many people tell me that they find
these candid discussions useful and helpful. Therefore, the nebulous
assertion that this FAQ is unnecessary is difficult, maybe impossible,
to support, and such an assertion (however sincere) does not deserve a
substantial reply.
The comment regarding first year law school experiences has very
little to do with the topics covered in this FAQ, as any Two L would
be able to tell with a casual glance at the TABLE OF CONTENTS. Your
first year law school experiences, as well as those from the rest of
your life, will be your own. No one can take that from you, not me
and certainly not a territorial Two L who has nothing relevant to say
yet purports to impeach the merits of this FAQ with petty character
attacks against me.

4.1.1) Where should I live during my first year at King Hall?

Your best bet is to live somewhere in Davis close to the law school.
See Section 6.1 for more information; see also the Davis USENET FAQ
(information on how to obtain the Davis USENET FAQ is contained in
Section 1.5).

4.1.1.1) Should I move into the graduate dorms at U.C. Davis, Lysle Leach
Hall?

No, but that's just my personal opinion. I lived at Leach Hall during
my first year of law school, and it was the worst experience of my
life. However, some law students actually enjoy the camaraderie that
they experience when they live with other law students at Leach Hall
and/or the convenience of living on campus. IMHO, Leach Hall was too
small, too expensive, and a host of petty rules were enforced
arbitrarily by the Resident Director (RD) whether or not anyone was
actually breaking the rules. Most of the people whom I know who have
lived at Leach Hall feel the same way. However, the RD (a King Hall
reject) who was the major source of grief for the residents at Leach
Hall has since gone on to bigger and better bureaucratic pursuits and
has been replaced by more mature and capable personnel.

4.1.1.2) Where else can I live during my first year at King Hall?

You can live in one of the other on campus housing facilities for
graduate and professional students, somewhere else in Davis, in one of
the small communities near Davis, in the Greater Sacramento Area, in
the San Francisco Bay Area, or anywhere else in Northern California.
See the sections in this FAQ and other FAQs that deal with life in
those regions; see also Section 6.4.2 for information on shuttle
services for commuters.

4.1.1.3) Is there any place to live on campus other than Leach Hall?

Yes. There are a number of on campus housing facilities for graduate
and professional students that are well worth your money, but they go
very fast and there is usually a long waiting list for them. For more
information about on campus housing at U.C. Davis, contact the Student
Housing Office (<mailto:hou...@ucdavis.edu >) at (916)752-2033.

4.1.2) FIRST YEAR COURSES AT KING HALL.

For a complete and current list of first year courses, readers with a
web browser may visit the King Hall First Year Courses Page on the
World Wide Web (<http://kinghall.ucdavis.edu/pages/first.htm >)

4.1.2.1) What courses are offered during the first year of law school at
King Hall?

One Ls at King Hall start classes a week earlier than second and third
year law students (Two Ls and Three Ls). During this first week
(Intro Week), King Hall offers a required credit/no credit course
called Introduction to Law (1 unit). No one who has taken the final
exam in this course has ever failed (and no, you won't be the first).
By the end of Intro Week, you will be assigned to a small class
section for the remainder of your first year. Your small section will
have one class together and you will be grouped with one or two other
small sections into one of two large sections for all of your other
classes (the total enrollment will be approximately 165 One L
students).
With a few minor changes, the courses that One Ls take remain the
same from year to year: Contracts, Civil Procedure, Constitutional
Law I, Criminal Law, Legal Research, Legal Writing, Real Property, and
Torts. Check the law school course catalog for more information on
these courses; see also the ucd.class.law202 USENET newsgroup
(<news:ucd.class.law202 >) for information on Contracts. Some of the
courses offered during the first semester are over at the semester
break. However, most courses offered during the first semester are
year long courses, and you will not receive final grades for these
courses until after the second semester. For this reason, your
first semester grades are not a good indicator of your class
standing. Your class standing will be determined at the end of the
second semester of your first year, and it will not change very much
after that.

4.1.2.2) How should I prepare for my classes?

Even though law school courses are pretty standardized, the best way
for you to prepare for your classes depends upon who your instructor
is for a particular course. If your instructor for a course has
taught that course before, find someone who has taken that course with
that particular instructor. These people will usually be willing to
provide you with a course outline that they prepared and be able to
tell you what to expect.

4.1.2.3) Should I brief my cases to prepare for my classes?

As a rule, no. But please note that my opinion on this subject flies
in the face of traditional wisdom. Briefing cases is an important
skill that you must learn and be able to demonstrate as a lawyer, but
it is tedious and time consuming and it will seldom help you
understand the law or improve your grades. However, this is a
personal decision. Some people brief all of their cases in all of
their classes during law school and do very well. As one e-mail
commentator noted, "practice makes perfect," so practice briefing your
cases and find out what works best for you.

4.1.2.4) Should I use commercial outlines and canned briefs?

As a rule, yes. Since most law school courses are standardized, this
will save you quite a bit of time and trouble. However, it is best to
use an outline prepared by a student who has taken the same course
from the same instructor you are taking since each instructor
emphasizes different things. If you do use a commercial outline or
canned brief to prepare for class, review it beforehand to make sure
that it's not wrong in some critical point. This happens all of the
time to students who rely upon commercial outlines and canned briefs,
and it is very embarrassing for everyone.
A number of commercial outlines are prepared by the authors of
your textbooks (which are not-so coincidentally your instructors at
King Hall in some cases). In contrast, canned briefs are usually
prepared by some unknown third party (to quote one e-mail commentator,
"CANNED BRIEFS SUCK!"). A third option for reducing your reading is
the "Headnotes" system that West Publishing provides. Headnotes are a
comprehensive cross-reference system of the law that digests and
organizes by topic the case law found in West's Reporters. I used
Headnotes whenever I had trouble understanding the relevant holding in
a case. As I found out during Legal Writing and later in Moot Court,
Headnotes will usually direct you to the most important and
controlling language in a published court decision.
I cannot overemphasize how important it is to develop your own
personal course outlines. While it may or may not actually have an
impact upon your grades (depending upon the instructor), it will help
you learn the law, which is presumably the reason that you came to law
school in the first place. If you form a study group, exchanging and
editing the work of others will also help you pinpoint your own
mistaken perceptions about the law.

4.1.2.5) Should I use "Hornbooks" to prepare for class?

Maybe. If your instructor is hard to comprehend, this is an excellent
way to bridge the gap. Hornbooks are written by the same people who
compile your casebooks, and hornbooks can help you understand the law
when your casebooks are unclear. Many Hornbooks are found in the
reserve section of the law library at King Hall.

4.1.2.6) Should I participate in class?

Absolutely not, unless the instructor specifically requests that you
do so. Whatever you do, don't volunteer. If you must volunteer your
comments during class, limit your comments to once a class meeting.
Instructors may pay lip service to class participation, but they do
not appreciate it when it is offered too frequently. Your teacher may
feel that you are arguing with him or her, and you will probably
suffer the social censure of most of your colleagues.
If you are truly inspired to offer your comments on a regular
basis, talk to the instructor after class. You will usually find that
many other students do the same thing. Talk to these students as
well. No one else really cares what you have to say in class. Most
students come to class to listen to the teacher. If you don't realize
that, then you are probably the free spot in "Law School Bingo." And
if you don't know about Law School Bingo is, ask one of your friends.

4.1.2.7) How important are final exams in law school?

In most law school classes, final exams are your whole grade. Thus,
you should spend most of your study time practicing essay exams from
previous final exams that are kept on reserve in the law library. You
do not need to know the law on a particular subject to take an essay
exam in that subject. In fact, you'll be surprised how much you can
learn about the law simply by taking a practice exam.
Taking practice exams will help you find out what you already
know and help you focus on what you still need to learn. Most
professors have a predilection towards particular exam topics and base
their grading system on an answer style that may or may not have
anything to do with the way that they teach their classes. The best
way to discover what your professor emphasizes on exams is to review
the exams that he or she keeps on file, particularly if those exams
include the AmJur award winner's essay (i.e., the highest grade given
on that exam).

4.1.2.7.1) What is the format of final exams?

Most final exams are a combination of essays and multiple choice:
Some are completely essay or completely multiple choice; the emphasis
is on essay exams, but you should also practice multiple choice
questions such as those used for the Multistate Bar Examination (MBE).
This will expose you to the nuances of the law that sometimes makes
the difference between a C+ and an A.

4.1.2.7.2) Can I type my essay exams?

Yes, and you should seriously consider doing so. You will be able to
cover much more ground in the same amount of time as those who
handwrite their exams and your typed exams will be much more legible
than a handwritten exam.

4.1.2.7.3) How do I go about typing my essay exams?

You need to get your typewriter approved each semester and fill out a
form requesting a typing room for each essay exam that you wish to
type. Contact Nicole Waterman (<mailto:ngwat...@ucdavis.edu >) or
Dian Francis (<mailto:dpfr...@ucdavis.edu >) in the King Hall
Registrar's Office in person or at (916)752-4299.

4.1.2.7.4) Can I use a word processor on my essay exams?

No, and your typewriter cannot have memory capability. [Note: You
CAN use a word processor on the California Bar Exam.]

4.1.2.8) How important are first year grades in law school?

First year grades in law school are *very* important, both to law
students and employers. Because of this, a dark cloud settles in over
King Hall during when first semester grades become available to One
Ls. Few students are spared an insult to their self-esteem. Even
those who eventually finish at the top of their class are confronted
with at least one mediocre grade at the semester break in a subject
that they thought they knew very well.
As important as grades are in the real world, grades are not a
reliable indicator of a law student's knowledge or ability. Grades
are simply an arbitrary (albeit consistent) method of ranking law
students for the job market. Those who finish in the top 10% of their
class at King Hall are courted by many employers, and virtually
everyone else must struggle long and hard to find a good job.
I have heard many proposals for remedying the suffering and
hardship caused by the forced grade curve at King Hall. Some people
have proposed changing the format and/or grading of exams or
abolishing grades altogether. Other people have proposed limiting the
number of resumes students may submit to firms who conduct On Campus
Interviews (OCI). These solutions, however well-intentioned, do not
address the crux of the issue: Our society feels compelled to rank
people's abilities by some reified "objective standard." Since King
Hall does not have the reputation and ranking of a Harvard or Yale,
grades are the only way to conform with society's expectations.
If letter grades were eliminated at King Hall, many qualified
students would be at a distinct disadvantage when looking for work.
And as many law firms will not consider applicants who are not in the
top 10% of their class, many of these firms would not participate in
OCI at King Hall. My personal solution was to play the hand that was
dealt to me and play it close to my chest, applying for the jobs that
interested me and giving equivocal and misleading information to all
who asked about my grades and class ranking (not even my mother knows
anything more than that I graduated from law school). No matter what
your own class ranking is, you will save yourself and others a lot of
grief if you use this strategy.

4.1.2.8.1) When will I find out what my grades are?

Your grades are supposed to be available about a month after final
exams are over, but some of the instructors are very slow to issue
grades. This may cause you a hardship if you want to defer one of
your first year courses based on your first semester grades or if you
are trying to transfer to another law school at the end of your second
semester. Otherwise, your grades are not that urgent, so just be
patient.

4.1.2.8.2) How can I find out what my grades are?

When your grades become available, you can find out what they are by
calling RSVP at (916)752-RSVP.

4.1.2.8.3) What if I think there has been a mistake in the grades that
were issued to me?

If you think that there has been a mistake in the grade you received
for one of your final exams (which can and does happen), you can
review your final exams. They are kept on file for one year. Contact
Nicole Waterman (<mailto:ngwat...@ucdavis.edu >) or Dian Francis
(<mailto:dpfr...@ucdavis.edu >) in the King Hall Registrar's Office
in person or at (916)752-4299 for an appointment.
If your grades are lower than what you expected, this is quite
normal. A 3.5 Grade Point Average (GPA) will probably put you in the
top 5-10% of your class at King Hall, if not at the very top of your
class because there of the forced curved imposed on first year courses
by the King Hall administration. No more than 11.7% of the grades can
be an A- or above, and your colleagues, against whom you are competing
for these grades, are highly motivated and highly qualified students.
Many of them have never received a grade lower than a B in their
entire lives. Thus, an A+ effort may only earn you a C+ at King Hall.

4.1.2.8.4) What is the American Jurisprudence Award?

The American Jurisprudence Award (AmJur award) is given to those law
students who receive the highest grade in each class section for the
various courses offered during the first year of law school at King
Hall (except Introduction to Law, Legal Research, and Legal Writing).
Many second and third year courses also include an AmJur award.
Winners of the AmJur award receive a certificate suitable for framing,
and a notation of the award is made on their transcripts.

- - - - -

End of document:

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 3 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >

Link to next document:

<http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part4.html >

Internet Esquire

unread,
Apr 9, 2004, 7:57:51 AM4/9/04
to
Archive-name: ucdavis/king-hall-faq/part2

Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Jun. 22, 1996
Version: 21Jun96 [ASCII/Multipart]
URL: <http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/ucdavis/
king-hall-faq/part2/faq.html >
Ebb: <http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part1.html >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 2 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ (King Hall USENET FAQ) may be comprised
of more than one part. If it is, please see the TABLE OF CONTENTS in Part
One for a complete list of the questions that I have attempted to answer
and for other important legal information. Caveat emptor: I assume no
obligation to anyone through the publication of the King Hall USENET FAQ.
Furthermore, all versions of the King Hall USENET FAQ are my personal
property and are protected by applicable copyright laws. All rights are
reserved except as follows: I hereby give my permission to anyone who has
access to this version of the King Hall USENET FAQ to reproduce the
information contained herein for non-profit purposes, provided that proper
credit is given to me as the author of this FAQ and that I am promptly
notified of any use other than personal use. I may revoke permission to
reproduce any version of this FAQ at any time.

- - - - -

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 2 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996 by David F. Prenatt, Jr.

1) ABOUT THIS FAQ.

1.1) Who wrote this FAQ and how can I reach him?[Rev]

This FAQ was written by me, David F. Prenatt, Jr., 1995 alumnus of the
University of California, Davis School of Law (King Hall). Until
further notice, you can reach me by my e-mail through the Davis
Community Network:

Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us (<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >)

or by snail-mail (i.e., U.S. Mail) through my Davis P.O. Box:

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
Internet Esquire(sm)
P.O. Box 74632
Davis, CA 95617-5632

or on the World Wide Web:

<http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/ >

1.2) What information is contained in this FAQ?

Anything that I, as the author of this FAQ, decided would be of
interest to members or would-be members of the King Hall community.
See PREFATORY QUESTIONS (Section 0) for more information.

1.3) How is this FAQ organized?

This version of this FAQ may be arbitrarily divided into unequal parts
where I felt it was convenient to do so. I did this for two reasons.
First, some readers of this FAQ may have specific questions and may
not want to read the entire FAQ. If this version of this FAQ is
comprised of more than one part, the first part will contain the
complete TABLE OF CONTENTS. Thus, readers of this FAQ may refer to
the TABLE OF CONTENTS to find out where to look for the specific
questions that they want answered. Second, some computer services are
unable to handle extremely large computer files. Thus, if this
version of this FAQ is comprised of more than one part, no one part
will exceed 32k. See the TABLE OF CONTENTS in this FAQ more detailed
information about how the contents of this version of this FAQ are
organized.
This FAQ uses standard Uniform Resource Locator (URL) references
to accomodate readers with a web browser:

<ftp://[ftp_site]/[directory]/[archive] >
(file transfer protocol)

<gopher://[gopher_address] >
(gopher protocol)

<http://[World_Wide_Web_address] >
(hypertext transfer protocol)

<mailto:[e-mail_account]@[domain] >
(SMTP: Simple Mail Transfer Protocol)

<news:[newsgroup_or_article-number@newserver] >
(NNTP: Network News Tranfer Protocol)

<telnet:[telnet_site] >
(IP: Internet protocol)

These URL references will act as hyptertext links for those using
Netscape to read this FAQ on the USENET.

1.4) How can I obtain this FAQ?

This FAQ is archived at rtfm.mit.edu in the pub/usenet/news.answers
directory under the archive name ucdavis/king-hall-faq/part* (where *
= 1 through 9), where it is available by anonymous ftp and e-mail
request. See Section 11.3.3.1 for more information about ftp and e-
mail request. This FAQ is updated once a month and posted to the
USENET newsgroups ucd.king-hall (<news:ucd.king-hall >) and
news.answers (<news:news.answers >). Snail-mail requests to me for
the King Hall USENET FAQ [Offline] (Version 21Jun96) will be honored
within the United States (U.S.), if those requests are accompanied by
$5.00 U.S. currency in the form of a check or money order for each
copy ordered to cover the cost of printing, shipping, and handling;
volume discounts and licensing agreements are available. At my
discretion, I may ship a more recent version of this FAQ unless you
specify otherwise. A hypertext version of this FAQ is currently
available from the USENET FAQ Project:

<http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/ucdavis/king-hall-faq/
top.html >

1.5) Are there any other FAQs available by the author of this FAQ? [Rev

7:01am Wednesday January 3, 1996]

Yes. I have published five other FAQS:

The U.C. Davis USENET FAQ, appearing on ucd.general <news:ucd.general
>, and available by anonymous ftp and e-mail request at the
rtmf.mit.edu ftp server:

<ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/ucdavis/faq/part1 >
. . . [through]. . .
<ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/ucdavis/faq/part6 >
(see part 1 for a complete list of the TABLE OF CONTENTS)

with a hypertext version available at the USENET FAQ Project:

<http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/ucdavis/faq/top.html >


The Davis, California USENET FAQ (Davis USENET FAQ), appearing on
davis.general (<news:davis.general >), and available by anonymous ftp
an e-mail request at the rtfm.mit.edu ftp server:

<ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/davis/faq/part1 >
. . . [through] . . .
<ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/davis/faq/part6 >
(see part 1 for a complete list of the TABLE OF CONTENTS)

with a hypertext version available at the USENET FAQ Project:

<http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/davis/faq/top.html >


The Yolo County, California USENET FAQ (Yolo County USENET FAQ),
appearing on yolo.general (<news:yolo.general >) and available by
anonymous ftp an e-mail request at the rtfm.mit.edu server:

<ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/yolo/faq/part1 >
<ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/yolo/faq/part2 >
<ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/yolo/faq/part3 >
(see part 1 for a complete list of the TABLE OF CONTENTS)

with a hypertext version available at the USENET FAQ Project:

<http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/yolo/faq/top.html >


The Sacramento, California USENET FAQ (Sacramento USENET FAQ),
appearing on sac.general (<news:sac.general >)and available by
anonymous ftp and e-mail request at the rtfm.mit.edu server:

<ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/sac/faq/part1 >
. . . [through] . . .
<ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/sac/faq/part6 >
(see part 1 for a complete list of the TABLE OF CONTENTS)

with a hypertext version available at the USENET FAQ Project:

<http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/sac/faq/top.html >


The San Francisco Bay Area USENET FAQ (Bay Area USENET FAQ),
appearing on ba.general (<news:ba.general >)and available by anonymous
ftp and e-mail request at the rtfm.mit.edu server:

<ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/sf-ba/faq/part1 >
. . . [through] . . .
<ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/sf-ba/faq/part9 >
(see part 1 for a complete list of the TABLE OF CONTENTS)

with a hypertext version available at the USENET FAQ Project:

<http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/sf-ba/faq/top.html >


These FAQs are updated once a month and the most current versions are
posted on news.answers (<news:news.answers >) and the appropriate
designated USENET newsgroup. Offline versions of the 21Jun96
releases of these FAQs are available within the U.S. by snail-mail
request, if your request is accompanied by $5.00 U.S. currency in the
form of a check or money order for each copy of each FAQ that you
order, to cover the cost of printing, shipping, and handling; volume
discounts and licensing agreements are available. Including the FAQs
that are listed here, I have about a dozen FAQS currently under
construction and/or pending approval of the *.answers team.

2) PREPARING FOR LAW SCHOOL.

2.1) What should I do to prepare for law school?

There is no right way to prepare for law school, academically or
otherwise. However, there are ways to maximize your chances of
getting admitted to the law school of your choice. In most instances,
what prepares you for law school is just living.

2.1.1) What sort of academic preparation is required for law school?

An undergraduate degree from a prestigious university is by far the
best way to maximize your appeal as a law school candidate. However,
many law schools do not even require that you have a four year degree.
In any event, other than the undergraduate education that most law
schools require, no scholastic preparation is necessary for success
once you are in law school.
While no scholastic preparation is necessary for law school, many
law students have advanced degrees in various disciplines. In fact,
many of them have already achieved remarkable success in careers other
than the law. In other words, people who are among the best and
brightest apply to law school. As such, most law schools can pick and
choose from whomever they want to have as incoming students.
Rather than simply pick the elite of the best and brightest,
however, law schools try to find people with unique and interesting
backgrounds to achieve diversity in the law school student body.
Thus, no student is guaranteed admission to any law school, regardless
of his or her credentials. This comes as quite a shock to many
applicants with impeccable credentials who are rejected by the law
school of their choice.

2.1.1.1) What undergraduate program should someone pursue if he or she
plans to go to law school?

An unusual undergraduate major typically maximizes your chances of
admission to law school. However, your class ranking as an
undergraduate is also very important because many other applicants
will probably have a scholastic background that is similar to yours,
so study something that you will enjoy and at which you will do well.

2.1.1.2) Aren't political science majors better prepared for law school
than other college graduates?

As a rule, no. Political science is a distinct and different
discipline than the law. Even so, many people who go to law school
have studied political science as an undergraduate. Other things
being equal, they are no better qualified to study the law than anyone
else is. They are also at a distinct disadvantage in the law school
application process, which favors diversity. The number of political
science majors who apply to law school and get accepted by the law
school of their choice is proportionately small when compared to other
undergraduate majors.

2.1.1.3) Wouldn't someone who studied a challenging undergraduate major be
better qualified to study the law than someone who studied
underwater basket weaving?

Not necessarily. No matter how challenging an undergraduate major is,
it does not qualify you to study law. It merely demonstrates your
ability in that undergraduate major and/or your commitment to that
major. Someone who excels at underwater basket weaving may be just as
qualified to study the law as someone who excels at the most
challenging undergraduate major. More important is the fact that
someone who has studied underwater basket weaving is more likely to
get admitted to the law school of his or her choice based on
diversity.

2.1.2) What else should I do to prepare for law school?

Whatever appeals to you. Some sort of work experience is usually your
best option.

2.1.2.1) What type of work experience best prepares someone for law
school?

With the possible exception of legal work experience, no particular
type of work experience prepares you for law school better than any
other. On the other hand, there is no work experience that does not
prepare you for law school. The law affects every aspect of modern
living, including virtually every type of job, so every type of work
experience prepares you for law school.

2.1.2.2) What other kinds of experience prepare someone for law school?

The best kind of experience to prepare someone for law school is
overcoming some sort of personal hardship. Law school can be a
humbling experience, even for the best and brightest. In my humble
opinion, those who get the most out of the law school experience are
those who know how to cope with both success and failure.

2.2) How do I know if I'm ready for law school?

Objectively speaking, no one is ever ready for law school. No one
leaves law school as the same person that he or she was when he or she
entered. Subjectively speaking, you are ready for law school whenever
you make the decision to apply.

2.2.1) What if I don't know why I want to go to law school?

Join the club. It is a rare individual who knows why he or she wants
to go to law school. Those who think that they know why they want to
go to law school typically discover opportunities in law school that
they had never considered before. Some people stick with their
original goals, but the odds are stacked against it.

2.2.2) What if I am too old to go to law school?

Nonsense. If you are young enough to think about going to law school,
then you are young enough to go. There is no such thing as a good
excuse for choosing not to do something that you want to do, and there
is no time like the present to start making up for lost time.

3) APPLYING TO LAW SCHOOL.

In the United States and elsewhere, the law school application process
feeds a cottage industry that is more or less controlled and directed
by the benevolent leadership of Law Services. For more information on
the ins-and-outs of applying to law school, contact Law Services at:

Law Services
Box 2000
661 Penn St
Newtown, PA 18940-0998

or visit the Law School Admissions Council Online Home Page on the
World Wide Web (<http://www.lsas.org/ >).

3.1) To which law school(s) should I submit (an) application(s)?

You should submit applications to as many law schools as possible,
covering a spectrum from the schools that you really want to attend to
the schools that you would attend if you had no other choice
(regardless of cost--the higher the tuition at a particular school,
the greater the financial aid awards are that they will offer). I
strongly recommend that you apply to my alma mater, King Hall, the
smallest (total enrollment approx. 500) and youngest (established
1969) of the four U.C. law schools. U.C. Davis Law School is approved
by the American Bar Association (ABA), it is highly ranked (both by
academics and professionals), and it is very affordable to California
residents (although tuition continues to rise). Also noteworthy is
the fact that graduates of King Hall have traditionally had the number
one passage rate on the California Bar Exam (arguably the hardest bar
exam in the nation), more consistently than any other law school in
California.

3.2) What do I need to do to apply to law school?

Every law school's application requirements are different, so contact
the law schools that you are interested in attending. Most law
schools require that you complete an application form and submit other
information with your application, such as personal references, a
personal statement, and the compilation of scholastic records that is
provided by the Law School Data Assembly Service (LSDAS). The LSDAS
reports your score(s) on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), which
you should take as early as possible. It is also important to apply
for financial aid and scholarships as early as possible. For more
information on the LSAT, the LSDAS, and appplying to law school,
contact Law Services (see Section 3 for information on how to contact
Law Services).

3.2.1) Who should I get to give me references for law school?

The identity of the people that provide your references is not as
important as their relationship to you. Some law schools specifically
request that you provide references from former professors or
employers. Whatever your relationship to the people whom you ask to
provide as a reference, pick people who will lavish praise upon you.

3.2.2) What should I include in my personal statement for my law school
application?

Be as honest as possible. Explain why you want to go to law school
and what you have to offer the legal profession and the particular law
school to which you are applying. Your personal statement is also
your only opportunity to highlight the many achievements that do not
fit on your application and to put your shortcomings into perspective.

3.2.3) How does the LSDAS work?

The LSDAS collects and standardizes your academic records to make it
easier for admissions personnel at various law schools to compare you
with other law school candidates.

3.2.4) How do I increase my chances of doing well on the LSAT?

There are many commercial LSAT preparation courses on the market, and
you should most certainly take one. The structure that such a course
imposes upon you will force you to prepare for the LSAT. Virtually
all LSAT courses offer good study materials and basic test taking
strategies. However, there is no substitute for practicing sample
LSAT questions under actual test conditions.

3.2.5) How do I apply for financial aid in law school?

Every law school is different. Contact the financial aid office at
the law school to which you plan to apply for this information. At
the very least, you will have to fill out a financial aid application
and forward Financial Aid Transcripts (FATs) from every college you
have ever attended (whether or not you have ever been on financial aid
before).

3.2.6) How do I decide upon which law school to attend if I am admitted to
more than one?

UC Berkeley (Boalt; <gopher://law164.law.berkeley.edu:70/1 >) is the
undisputed number one choice of the four UC law schools among law
school applicants, with UCLA (<http://www.law.ucla.edu/ >) a strong
second; some people prefer to attend UC Hastings College of the Law
(<http://www.uchastings.edu/ >), because of its strong emphasis on
business. While King Hall stands in the shadow of its three older and
more established sister law schools, the only U.C. law school to give
King Hall a run for its money, IMHO, is Boalt Hall, primarily because
Boalt Hall has such a high national ranking and thus attracts a highly
distinguished faculty (some of which it occasionally borrows from King
Hall). UCLA has very good name recognition, and is an excellent
choice if you intend to remain in the Southern California area.
Because of its local name recognition and downtown San Francisco
location, Hastings is a good choice for those who intend to work in
the San Francisco Bay area.
I could brag about the King Hall tradition of having the number
one bar passage rate, the commitment of King Hall alumni/alumnae to
public interest law, or the distinguished faculty and outstanding
clinical programs that King Hall has to offer, but if you are having
trouble making up your mind between King Hall and another UC law
school, I suggest that you visit King Hall and see for yourself what
my alma mater has to offer. You can contact Sharon L. Pinkney
(<mailto:slpi...@ucdavis.edu >) at the King Hall Admissions Office
at (916)752-6477 to arrange a visit. She can arrange for you to spend
the day with a current law student and attend some actual classes.
You will then be able to make an informed choice.
Outside of the UC system, it is hard to beat King Hall. If I
were you, I would not give serious consideration to another law school
over King Hall unless it places within the top 10 law schools found in
the U.S. News and World Report rankings. I applied to Harvard, Yale,
and Columbia as well as all the UC law schools just in case I did not
get admitted to King Hall, but I had made my choice to attend King
Hall long before I sent out any of my law school applications (or
received any of my inevitable rejection letters).

3.3) How do I apply for admission to King Hall?

Contact Sharon Pinkney (<mailto:slpi...@ucdavis.edu >) at the King
Hall Admissions Office (916)752-6477 for this information; readers
with a web browser may visit the King Hall Admissions Web Page on the
World Wide Web (<http://kinghall.ucdavis.edu/pages/admiss.htm >).

3.4) How do I apply for financial aid at King Hall?

Contact Lu Bastian (<mailto:lrba...@ucdavis.edu >), the Director of
Financial Aid at King Hall, at (916)752-6573 for this information;
readers with a web browser may visit the King Hall Financial Aid Web
Page (<http://kinghall.ucdavis.edu/pages/financ.htm >). If I were to
pick one reason why I chose to attend King Hall rather than some other
law school, it would have to be the Financial Aid Department. I
cannot speak to the horror stories that I have heard about financial
aid at other schools because Lu Bastian is a saint. The members of
her support staff, currently one Cyndie Alvarez Necoechea
(<mailto:calv...@ucdavis.edu >), have always been of similar
character. They protected me from the harsh realities of the real
world of financial aid.
I had never been on financial aid before I attended King Hall,
and I found the financial aid process at most law schools to be
unnecessarily intrusive, degrading, problematic, and bureaucratic.
The only place that I encountered any problems of my own making was at
King Hall, yet the financial aid process at King Hall was by far the
smoothest one (so smooth that I stopped entertaining any serious
thoughts that I may have had of attending any other law school). I
cannot emphasize how important it is to listen to what Lu Bastian and
her staff tell you to do. When it comes to matters of financial aid,
their word should be heeded as though it were gospel. They will do
their level best to pull your fat out of the fire, but they can't
always do so. And if they can't help you, no one else can.

3.5) Where can I get more information about law school?

Law School Services sponsors a number of Law School forums in
different areas of the country to which virtually all law schools send
a representative. Contact Law Services for more information (see
Section 3 for information on how to reach Law Services). The
bit.listserv.lawsch-l USENET newsgroup (<news:bit.listserv.lawsch-l >)
also provides a forum for the discussion of issues related to law
school.

3.6) What sort of educational programs do law schools offer? [Rev]

Most law schools offer a Juris Doctor (JD) program. This is usually a
three year program that begins after you receive a four year
undergraduate degree. Some law schools also offer the JD program
spread out over four years (for instance, in a night school program).
A few people continue their legal education after they have received a
JD (for instance, in an LLM program), but this is extremely rare. A
JD is typically a terminal degree.
There are 175 or 176 law schools accredited by the American Bar
Association (ABA) [at least one keeps losing its accreditation].
These law schools are much more prestigious than schools that have
some other form of accreditation, and most people think that ABA
accredited law schools are much better than other law schools. This
is generally true, and if you have the option, you should attend an
ABA accredited law school. However, not everyone can attend an ABA
accredited law school, and many fine law schools do not receive ABA
accreditation. For that matter, many fine lawyers never even attend
law school. Check with the bar association in the jurisdiction in
which you intend to practice to find out about other options for
studying the law.

3.7) Can I transfer to King Hall from another law school?

Yes, and in recent years, an increasingly large number of students
have done so. During my first year as a law student in 1992-93,
approximately five students transferred to King Hall with advanced
standing in the Two L class that was one year ahead of me. The year
after I graduated (1995-96), approximately *thirty-five* students
transferred into the Two L class. While some of these tranfer
students come from law schools that do not enjoy as good a reputation
as King Hall or are not as affordable as King Hall, a surprisingly
larger number of these students come from law schools that are neck
and neck with King Hall in terms of both reputation and price.
King Hall transfer students tend to be exceptionally good law
students, before and after they transfer to King Hall. Moreover, the
King Hall transfer students whom I knew seemed to experience a form of
stress relief after they transferred to King Hall. That is, a sense
of euphoria overtook them as they settled into the law school culture
at King Hall, and they found their King Hall experience more enjoyable
and rewarding than their experiences at the law schools from which
they transferred.
I would normally take these glowing reviews of King Hall with a
grain of salt. It's possible that King Hall is a Shangri-la, but it's
also possible that the first year of law school just plain sucks for
most everyone. Thus, no matter where someone attends his or her first
year of law school, when he or she transfers to another school, things
might seem much better than they really are. At the same time, I have
not heard picturesque accounts of other law schools from people who
have transferred to those other law schools from King Hall, so I am
inclined to accept the notion that King Hall transfer students are
somewhat unique in their affection for King Hall.

- - - - -

End of document:

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 2 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >

Link to next document:

<http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part3.html >

Internet Esquire

unread,
Apr 9, 2004, 7:57:53 AM4/9/04
to
Archive-name: ucdavis/king-hall-faq/part6

Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Jun. 22, 1996
Version: 21Jun96 [ASCII/Multipart]
URL: <http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/ucdavis/
king-hall-faq/part6/faq.html >
Ebb: <http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part5.html >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 6 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ (King Hall USENET FAQ) may be comprised
of more than one part. If it is, please see the TABLE OF CONTENTS in Part

One for a complete list of the questions that have attempted to answer and


for other important legal information. Caveat emptor: I assume no

obligation for anyone through the publication of the King Hall USENET FAQ.


Furthermore, all versions of the King Hall USENET FAQ are my personal
property and are protected by applicable copyright laws. All rights are
reserved except as follows: I hereby give my permission to anyone who has
access to this version of the King Hall USENET FAQ to reproduce the
information contained herein for non-profit purposes, provided that proper
credit is given to me as the author of this FAQ and that I am promptly
notified of any use other than personal use. I may revoke permission to
reproduce any version of this FAQ at any time.

- - - - -

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 6 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996 by David F. Prenatt, Jr.

4.3) THE THIRD YEAR OF LAW SCHOOL AT KING HALL.

4.3.1) Why is there a third year of law school?

Apparently, to make sure that your second year is not your last year.
The first year they scare you to death; the second year they work you
to death; and the third year, they bore you to death. Keep this in
mind when planning your course schedule.

4.3.2) What does one do during the third year of law school?

Different people do different things, but most of the time the third
year of law school is simply a recapitulation of the second year. The
changing of the guard is effected on Law Review and Moot Court as new
boards are elected to these programs. Your third year is also a good
time to do a clinical.

4.4) LAW STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS.

[Note: I have specifically decided against including a list and
description of the various law student organizations at King Hall.
You will find such a list and description in the application pamphlet
that is sent out to prospective law school applicants; readers with a
web browser may visit the King Hall Student Organizations Web Page on
the World Wide Web (<http://kinghall.ucdavis.edu/pages/stuorg.htm >).
Virtually all of the law student organizations at King Hall are
chartered through the University and funded primarily through the Law
Student Association (LSA) and bake sales. Each organization defines
its own purpose, and as each law student organization has an open
membership, each organization is best defined by those students who
choose to become its members. One student organization that purported
to represent a particular ethnic/cultural group held a vote wherein
two of its members voted to exclude students who were not members of
that particular ethnic/cultural group. A big controversy erupted when
the names of the two members so voting were published on the King Hall
dayboard by one of the members who would have been excluded had the
vote carried.
During my tenure as a law student at King Hall, I belonged to a
number of student organizations that I thought were worthwhile, and I
served as the Vice President of the King Hall Federalist Society
(<http://kinghall.ucdavis.edu/stu_org/fed_soc/ >). I also patronized
all of the fund raising activities and social events that interested
me without regard for which student organizations were hosting or
sponsoring it. As a general rule, I think it is foolish to boycott an
unpopular organization.

4.5) SERVICES AVAILABLE TO KING HALL STUDENTS.

4.5.1) SERVICES AVAILABLE TO LAW STUDENTS THROUGH KING HALL.

4.5.1.1) LIBRARY SERVICES AT KING HALL.

Readers with a web browser may visit the King Hall Law Library Home
Page on the World Wide Web:

<http://kinghall.ucdavis.edu/library/lawlib.htm >


4.5.1.1.1) What library services are available to law students at King
Hall?

All King Hall students, faculty, and staff are issued a key to the
building and have access to the law library (other than the reserve
section) 24 hours a day. Most books may be checked out to your study
carrel, which you share with other students until your third year of
law school. In addition, the law library catalog is available by
telnet at innopac.ucdavis.edu (<telnet:innopac.ucdavis.edu >; account
and password=guest). Check with the Law School Library Reference Desk
at (916)752-3327 for more information on the various library services
available to King Hall students.

4.5.1.1.2) What should I do if I encounter trespassers after hours in the
library at King Hall?

You have many options to deal with trespassers at King Hall, but you
are not obliged to do anything about them. U.C. Davis is a public
university, and members of the general public have a right to use the
facilities at the law school to study or do legal research. However,
if someone doesn't have a key to King Hall, they don't have a right to
be in the building after the law library closes.
The official policy of the law school is that no one without a
key to the building is allowed to be in King Hall after the law
library closes, but this policy is not strictly enforced. I always
treated trespassers as "uninvited guests" and tolerated them unless
they did something that bothered me. However, if you want trespassers
to leave, you don't need to give any justification. Simply place a
call to the campus police, and the campus police will get rid of the
trespassers very quickly.

4.5.1.2) Financial Aid.

For information about Financial Aid, contact the King Hall Financial
Aid Director Lu Bastian (<mailto:lrba...@ucdavis.edu >) in person
or at (916)752-6573. She and her staff, currently one Cyndie Alvarez
Necoechea (<mailto:calv...@ucdavis.edu >), have my unequivocal
endorsement.
Readers with a web browser may visit the Law School Financial Aid
Home Page on the World Wide Web:

<http://kinghall.ucdavis.edu/pages/financ.htm >


4.5.1.3) Career Services. [Rev]

For information about Career Services, contact the King Hall Career
Sevices Director Jane Thomson (<mailto:jtho...@ucdavis.edu >) at
(916)752-6574. See also Section 4.6.5 for information on career
planning resources on the Internet.

4.5.1.4) The Perfect Tender Infant Care Co-op.

Student volunteers, some of them parents themselves, staff the Perfect
Tender Infant Care Co-op, which cares for the infants (under one year)
of law students.

4.5.1.5) Computer Services at King Hall.

For information about Computer Services at King Hall, contact Computer
Specialist Steve Langford (<mailto:sdlan...@ucdavis.edu >) at
(916)752-SLOW. While no one has all the answers, Steve has more
answers about computers than most people do, and if he doesn't have
immediate answers to your computer questions, he will usually be able
to refer you to someone else who does. See Section 11.2 for more
information about computer services at King Hall.

4.5.1.6) Food at King Hall.

Between 9am and Noon during most school days, you stand about a 50/50
chance of encountering a bake sale downstairs. Similarly on school
days, you stand about a 1 in 5 chance that some organization is
offering free food to encourage attendance at one of its meetings. If
all else fails, there are several vending machines on the bottom floor
of the law school. Of course you can always brave the elements and
take a five minute walk to the Silo or the Coffee House. See Section
5.1 for more information on food services on the U.C. Davis campus.

4.5.2) SERVICES AVAILABLE TO LAW STUDENTS THROUGH U.C. DAVIS.

See the U.C. Davis USENET FAQ for information about services available
to law students through U.C. Davis (see Section 1.5 for information on
how to obtain the U.C. Davis USENET FAQ).

4.6) OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST TO KING HALL STUDENTS.

4.6.1) SPECIAL EVENTS AT KING HALL. [Rev]

Special events are constantly occurring at King Hall. The list below
is far from exhaustive. For exact dates and times, watch the
dayboard, the ucd.king-hall USENET newsgroup (<news:ucd.king-hall>),
and/or the King Hall Calendar of Events on the World Wide Web
(<http://kinghall.ucdavis.edu/pages/calend.htm >).

* The One L Welcome BBQ.
Sunday before Intro Week.

* The Intro Week LSA Kegger.
Friday of Intro Week.

* The Phi Delta Phi Big Sib/Li'l Sib Mixer. Early on in the
Fall Semester.

* Cardozarama: The King Hall Talent Show. Spring Semester.

* Over the Hump: The King Hall "Senior Prom" (and no, you
don't need a date--why bring sand to the beach?). Spring
Semester.

* The King Hall Legal Foundation (KHLF) Spring Auction: To
benefit public interest law. Spring Semester.

* The Lorenzo Patino Banquet. Spring Semester.

* Various awards ceremonies.


4.6.2) INFORMATION ON KING HALL STUDENTS, FACULTY, STAFF, AND ALUMNI.

4.6.2.1) The King Hall Counselor.

King Hall publishes the King Hall Counselor for the UC Davis Alumni
Association which reports news and information about King Hall, its
faculty, students, and alumni/alumnae. Contact Amy M. Helsel Director
of Development, Alumni and Public Relations, for more information at
(916)752-6679 or e-mail the King Hall Alumni Association
(<mailto:alu...@lawadmin.ucdavis.edu >).

4.6.2.2) The UC Davis Annual Fund/STUDENTS FIRST Campaign.

The two year STUDENTS FIRST Campaign, which is still in progress as of
the date of this FAQ, will fund student scholarships and endowments
for public interest law and trial and appellate advocacy. A $75,000
gift by Kronick, Moskovitz, Tiedemann & Girard of Sacramento provides
for scholarships to King Hall students and is accompanied by a
commitment to provide employment opportunities for scholarship
recipients. Philip G. Satre, King Hall Class of 1975, and his wife
Jennifer Satre gave a record breaking $125,000 gift and committed
themselves to an additional gift of $125,000 with a challenge to match
their original gift of $125,000.
Contact Dean Bruce Wolk (<mailto:baw...@ucdavis.edu >) at
(916)752-0243 or Amy M. Helsel (<mailto:amhe...@ucdavis.edu >) at
(916)752-6679 for more information about the STUDENTS FIRST Campaign.

4.6.2.3) King Hall Faculty on the World Wide Web.

For information on King Hall faculty, readers with a web browser may
visit the King Hall Faculty Web Page on the World Wide Web:

<http://kinghall.ucdavis.edu/pages/faculty.htm >


4.6.2.4) King Hall Law Students on the World Wide Web.

A number of King Hall students maintain Home Pages on the World Wide
Web:

* Haeji Hong (<mailto:ha...@sunset.bph.jhu.edu >), Class of
1998, maintains a Home Page on the World Wide Web with links
to outlines of first year courses and other useful
information (<http://sunset.bph.jhu.edu/~haeji >).

* Lynn Loschin (<mailto:llos...@netcom.com >), Class of 1997,
also maintains a Home Page on the World Wide Web with links
to all sorts of items, some of which are even law-related
(<http://www.microserve.com/PlanetX/lloschin.html >).


4.6.3) LAW SCHOOL STUDENT PUBLICATIONS.

There are several official law school publications run by King Hall
students:

* Environs: An environmental law journal.

* The King Hall Advocate: The King Hall student newspaper.

* The U.C. Davis Journal of International Law and Policy:
This brand new journal is still in its infancy and is
actively soliciting sponsors and donations. Subscriptions
are $18 for two issues.

* The U.C. Davis Law Review: Subscriptions to the U.C. Davis
Law Review are $30 for four issues. Contact Alice Trujillo
(<mailto:antru...@ucdavis.edu >) for more information at
(916)752-2551; FAX (916)752-4704.


4.6.4) THE ORDER OF THE COIF.

The Order of the Coif is an honor society whose membership is
comprised of those law students who graduate in the top 10% of their
class. To qualify for membership in the Order of the Coif at King
Hall, law students must complete a 75% of their units in graded
coursework.

4.6.5) CAREER PLANNING RESOURCES ON THE INTERNET. [Rev]

I have specifically omitted from this section any resources that
require a fee. Accordingly, the following list is far from
exhaustive. For more information about career planning resources on
the Internet, contact Jane Thomson, Director of Career Services at
King Hall(<mailto:jtho...@ucdavis.edu >) at (916)752-6574.

* Career Planning Resources from the Federal Government.

Federal Jobs Library:
<http://fwux.fedworld.gov/pub/jobs >;
<ftp://fwux.fedworld.gov/pub/jobs >;
<ftp://fjob.mail.opm.gov >;
<ftp://fjob.mail.opm.gov/APPS/FJOB_FTP/PUB/jobs >.

Human Resources Employmnent Information:
<http://www.nps.gov/personnel/index.html >.

U.S. Dept of the Interior Auto Vacancy System:
<http://info.er.usgs.gov/doi/avads/index.html >.

U.S. Dept of Justice Gopher Server:
<gopher://gopher/usdoj.gov >.

U.S. Dept of Justice Attorney Job Listings.
<gopher://gopher.usdoj.gov/l/jobs >;
<gopher://justice2.usdoj.gov:70/11/jobs >.

U.S. Dept of Justice, Office of Attorney Personnel Management:
<gopher://justice2.usdoj.gov:70/11/oapm >.


* State and Local Governments on the Internet.

State and Local Governments on the Net:
<http://www.webcom.com/~piper/state/states.html >.


* Public Interest Law Firms on the Internet.

Essential Information (<http://www.essential.org >.

National Association for Public Interest Law
<http://www.essential.org/org/napil/napil.html >.


* Private Law Firms on the Internet.

Indiana Law School's List of Law Firms:
<http://www.law.indiana.edu/law/v-lib/lawfirms.html >.


* Legal Job Resource Links on the Yahoo Directory.

Government Resources:
<http://www.yahoo.com/Government >;
<http://www.yahoo.com/Government/Agencies >;
<http://www.yahoo.com/Government/Judicial_Branch >.

Public Interest Groups:
<http://www.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Organizations/
Public_Interest_Groups >.

Private Firms:
<http://www.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Companies >;
<http://www.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Companies/Law >;
<http://www.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Companies/Law/Directories >;
<http://www.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Companies/Law/Firms >.


* Classified Ad Listings.

The Recorder & The San Diego Daily Transcript:
<http://www.callaw.com/classified/lawad.html >.

The National Law Journal & New York Law Journal:
<http://www.lawjobs.com >.


* Miscellaneous Career Planning Resources.

The Riley Guide (<http://www.wpi.edu/~mfriely/jobguide.html >).

Lexis-Nexis Jobs Page:
<http://www.lexis-nexis.com/lncc/about/employment/jobs.html >.

LawInfo Legal Job Notices (<http://www.lawinfo.com/employment >).

West Publishing Company Links:
<http://westpub.com >;
<http://westpub.com/WLAWInfo/wlawhome.htm >;
<http://westpub.com/WLAWInfo/WLD.htm >;
<gopher://wld.westlaw.com:70/7waissrc%3A.dir/
wld/Wests-Legal-Directory%5BWLD%5D >;
<http://www.westpub.com/htbin/wld >;
<http://www.wais.com/Wests-Legal-Directory.html >.


- - - - -

End of document:

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 6 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >

Link to next document:

<http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part7.html >

Internet Esquire

unread,
Apr 9, 2004, 7:57:53 AM4/9/04
to
Archive-name: ucdavis/king-hall-faq/part5

Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Jun. 22, 1996
Version: 21Jun96 [ASCII/Multipart]
URL: <http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/ucdavis/
king-hall-faq/part5/faq.html >
Ebb: <http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part4.html >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 5 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ (King Hall USENET FAQ) may be comprised
of more than one part. If it is, please see the TABLE OF CONTENTS in Part

One for a complete list of the questions that have attempted to answer and


for other important legal information. Caveat emptor: I assume no

obligation for anyone through the publication of the King Hall USENET FAQ.


Furthermore, all versions of the King Hall USENET FAQ are my personal
property and are protected by applicable copyright laws. All rights are
reserved except as follows: I hereby give my permission to anyone who has
access to this version of the King Hall USENET FAQ to reproduce the
information contained herein for non-profit purposes, provided that proper
credit is given to me as the author of this FAQ and that I am promptly
notified of any use other than personal use. I may revoke permission to
reproduce any version of this FAQ at any time.

- - - - -

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 5 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996 by David F. Prenatt, Jr.

4.2) THE SECOND YEAR OF LAW SCHOOL AT KING HALL.

4.2.1) ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS (OCI).

4.2.1.1) What is OCI?

The term OCI refers to the longstanding practice of various law firms
to coordinate their hiring efforts through Career Services (primarily
for second year law students). The OCI process is not unlike rushing
fraternities and sororities (i.e., a superficial popularity contest).

4.2.1.2) Should I participate in OCI?

It depends upon what kind of job you want. OCI takes up a lot of time
and energy, and you may end up getting a high-paying/dead-end job with
a glass ceiling. About seven years after law school, many lawyers who
go to work for large firms find themselves out of a job and without
enough practical legal experience to open their own law firm. In
other words, be careful what you wish for, it may come true.
At the same time, many legal employers use OCI by default. So if
you opt out of OCI entirely, you may miss out on many of the job
opportunities that might really interest you. And a baffling fact of
life is that many legal employers will not offer you a position until
you prove that you are appealing to other law firms. And when you
receive an actual job offer, you can contact a potential employer who
has been sitting on your resume and use the job offer you have as a
bargaining chip for a job offer that you want (tactfully, of course).
So applying for jobs that you don't want can help you get jobs that
you do want.

4.2.1.3) What alternatives are there to OCI? [Rev]

You can simply apply for the jobs that interest you. For one reason
or another, many job openings are not filled through OCI (smaller
firms, for example, cannot plan that far ahead). Whatever you choose
to do, be discrete about your success and your failure. Much like
first year grades, looking for a job during the second year of law
school is a challenge to the self-esteem of most law students,
particularly those who don't get the job offers that they want. See
Section 4.6.5 for information on Career Planning Resources on the
Internet.

4.2.1.4) What are call-back interviews?

Call-back interviews (call-backs) are pretty much what they sound
like: Interviews that take place after employers call back the job
applicants who made a good first impression at their initial OCI
interviews. Call-backs usually require job applicants to travel
overnight to out of town law firms and miss a day of school.
Depending upon the law firm, applicants may or may not be reimbursed
for mileage, taxis, meals, plane fares, and hotel accomodations.
The inconvenience of OCI and call-backs cannot be overstated. If
you are "lucky" enough to get the job interviews that you want, you
will still be overwhelmed with the demands on your time that will
accompany out of town travel. Accordingly, the "lucky" people must
often decide between OCIs/call-backs and sleeping and/or studying.
Moreover, your second year of law school, when most OCIs take place,
is filled with activities such as Law Review and Moot Court that will
demand most, if not all, of your time.

4.2.2) JUDICIAL CLERKSHIPS.

4.2.2.1) What is a judicial clerkship?

A judicial clerkship is a paid position as a legal clerk working for a
judge or group of judges that begins after you graduate from law
school. Judicial clerkships are different from judicial externships,
which are often completed for course credit during law school.
Judicial clerkships are extremely prestigious and the competition for
these positions is very fierce.

4.2.2.2) How do I apply for a judicial clerkship?

Each judicial clerkship has its own guidelines. Contact the
individual judge's chambers for more information on a particular
clerkship. King Hall also has a special clerkship committee that
helps King Hall students put together necessary materials. For more
information, contact Jane Thomson (<mailto:jtho...@ucdavis.edu >) at
the Career Services Office, (916)752-6574.

4.2.3) SECOND AND THIRD YEAR COURSES AT KING HALL.

For a complete and current list of second and third year courses,
readers with a web browser may visit the King Hall Second and Third
Year Courses Web Page on the World Wide Web:

<http://kinghall.ucdavis.edu/pages/2nd3rd.htm >


4.2.3.1) LAW REVIEW AND MOOT COURT.

4.2.3.1.1) Should I do Law Review or Moot Court?

Yes. Either one or both (I did both).

4.2.3.1.1.1) Which program is better, Law Review or Moot Court?

Law Review is much more prestigious than Moot Court and can open up a
lot of doors for you, but Law Review is also much more demanding on
your time than Moot Court. Both programs are very rewarding.

4.2.3.1.1.2) Can I do both Law Review and Moot Court?

Yes, at least during the Fall Semester. Alternatively, you can do
Moot Court during your third year, but that would preclude serving on
the Moot Court Board or Moot Court Teams during your third year.
Whether you want to continue with Law Review during your second
semester is the real issue.

4.2.3.1.2) What sort of demands upon my time should I expect from Law
Review?

The first semester (i.e., the Fall Semester) of Law Review requires
"candidates for membership" to fulfill modest office hour
requirements, complete a cite checking assignment, and submit two
drafts of a "note" or "comment" on a topic of their choice. However,
the second semester of Law Review is extremely demanding, whether or
not you succeed in becoming a Member or Editor. [Note: first
semester requirements for Law Review Writers were recently changed
from one "good faith draft" during the Fall Semester to two drafts.
The jury is still out on the prudence of this decision, which is
intended to speed up the process by which people become Law Review
Editors, but which will also act as a gatekeeping mechanism for people
who are sitting on the fence about whether to do Law Review at all.]

4.2.3.1.2.1) How do I become a Law Review Member?

Any second year law student at King Hall can "write-on" as a Member of
Law Review. Each draft of your note or comment is reviewed by two
staff editors who are assigned to you, and you revise your note or
comment according to their editorial feedback. When your staff
editors run out of criticism, they usually recommend your draft to the
Notes and Comments Editor who is assigned to you. Your Notes and
Comments Editor makes the decision as to when you qualify for Member.
More information on becoming a Law Review Member can be found on the
World Wide Web at Law Review Questions and Answers for Prospective
Students (<http://kinghall.ucdavis.edu/stu_org/lawrev/candidat.htm >).

4.2.3.1.2.1.1) How do I pick a good topic for my law review article?

Most people make their choice of a law review topic based on a
personal predilection towards a particular issue (as I did). Other
student writers try to pick a topic that they think will be
interesting to their intended audience. After careful consideration
and months of pounding my head against a wall, I came to the well-
reasoned conclusion that the best method of choosing a topic for a law
review article is what I refer to as the "cynic's choice."
Rather than reinvent the wheel, the best way to find a "good
topic" for your own student article is to read through other student
articles until you find one that you think is well-written. Then,
research that well-written article until you find another student
article (that virtually always exists) contradicting the first article
on some key point. You have now found that mysterious and mystical
"split in authority" to which law review editors constantly refer
[technically, a split in authority should be between different
jurisdictions], along with two model articles with which to structure
your own work. You will also have a humongous head start on your own
legal research, and you will need it.
Law Review is not a creative writing process. It is an exercise
in tedious research that focusses on recapitulating and elucidating
(in "Plain English"--irony intentional) the work of other legal
scholars. Try as you may, you will never find a "good topic" for a
student article on which someone else has never written, and you are
foolish to try. By definition, the good topics are all taken.

4.2.3.1.2.1.2) Isn't the "cynic's choice" method of finding a law review
topic somehow . . . dishonest?

Quite the opposite. It requires you to be honest with yourself and
face the truth that takes most Law Review Writers (including me)
months to realize: As a Law Review Writer, you don't have an original
idea in your head that anyone else cares to read. Every intellectual
assertion that you make in your student article needs at least two
supporting authorities (if not more to convince a skeptical Law Review
Staff Editor that you are really on to something). If your ideas for
your article are truly original, they are probably fatally flawed; at
best they will be unsupportable.

4.2.3.1.2.2) How do I become a Law Review Editor?

The process is pretty much the same as becoming a Law Review Member,
but new staff editors are assigned to you, more exacting standards are
invoked, and the Editor in Chief must approve your paper after you are
recommended for Editor. [Note: Exceptions to this process do exist.
Check with one of the current Notes & Comments Editors or Editor in
Chief if you think that special circumstances apply to your
situation.]

4.2.3.1.2.3) What happens after I become a Law Review Editor?

After you become a Law Review Editor, you review the work of Law
Review Candidates and Members as described above. You may also wish
to seek one of the elected positions on the Law Review Editorial
Board. Check with current Board Members for further information on
these positions.

4.2.3.1.2.4) What happens if I am not recommended to become a Law Review
Member or Editor?

You can always appeal such a decision by your editors, but the odds
are stacked against you. The guidelines for what constitutes a member
or editor quality draft are very subjective. Thus, it's best to
comply with the editorial demands of your editors. Many good law
review writers who do not succeed in becoming a Member or Editor are
simply too defensive about the editorial feedback that they receive.
On the other hand, your editors may neglect their duties to you.
If this happens, you should promptly report the situation to someone
you can trust, preferably someone who can take some sort of remedial
action. Otherwise, you will end up as one of the many people who gets
eliminated from the law review process every year. You may get
eliminated anyway if you encounter some sort of problem with your
topic that you cannot fix, such as pre-emption.
If for some reason you are unable to continue with Law Review, it
is not the end of the world. Many people continue working on their
law review article to complete the Advanced Writing Requirement and
obtain independent study course credit. At least one person I know
had her law review article published in a prestigious journal after
she lost an appeal for Law Review Membership.

4.2.3.1.2.5) Why should I do Law Review?

Most people are compelled to do Law Review because of its resume value
and the great prestige that it confers. Above and beyond this, Law
Review gives you formal access to your colleagues who are a year ahead
of you. Thus, Law Review is an excellent opportunity for you to hone
your legal research and writing skills in a very demanding academic
environment.

4.2.3.1.3) What is Moot Court?

When most people talk about Moot Court, they are talking about the
year long program of Appellate Advocacy at King Hall. There are
actually several Moot Court programs; Appellate Advocacy is the most
popular one.

4.2.3.1.3.1) Why should I do Moot Court?

Moot Court will help you acquire valuable skills in oral advocacy.
Having clerked for Moot Court as a One L, I though I knew what to
expect from oral arguments, but boy was I wrong. I have never had a
fear of public speaking, but during my first oral argument in Legal
Writing as a One L, I experienced an adrenaline rush that really
surprised me. All at once it occurred to me that I was confronting a
hostile heckler to whom I was required to show deference (i.e., the
judge) while at the same time zealously advocating the interests of my
client. I decided to do Moot Court because I realized that it's best
to learn how to cope with such epiphanies in an academic setting
rather than in a real courtroom.

4.2.3.1.3.2) What should I expect from Moot Court?

The first semester (i.e., Fall Semester) of Moot Court (i.e.,
Appellate Advocacy) involves researching and arguing both sides of
three hypothetical cases on appeal. The second semester of Moot Court
is different in that it involves a single hypothetical case comprised
of two issues on appeal; you work with a partner who helps you prepare
a written brief. Participation in the second semester of Moot Court
is also used to qualify students for certain Moot Court teams.

4.2.3.1.3.3) How do I qualify for a Moot Court team?

Many of the Moot Court teams are selected from the Appellate Advocacy
program, but there are several other teams that are sponsored
independently by the law school that have nothing to do with the
Appellate Advocacy program. In addition, you can create your own team
for one of the competitions that is not sponsored by the law school.

4.2.3.1.3.4) What is the Moot Court Board?

The Moot Court Board runs the year long Appellate Advocacy program.
Students are elected to the Moot Court Board by the outgoing Board.

4.2.3.2) THE ADVANCED WRITING REQUIREMENT.

Many people use Law Review or Moot Court to complete the Advanced
Writing Requirement, but any professor can supervise an Advanced
Writing Project to help you complete this requirement. For more
information, contact Nicole Waterman (<mailto:ngwat...@ucdavis.edu


>) or Dian Francis (<mailto:dpfr...@ucdavis.edu >) in the King Hall
Registrar's Office in person or at (916)752-4299.

4.2.3.3) CLINICALS.

4.2.3.3.1) Should I take a clinical? [Rev]

Yes. It is an opportunity that few attorneys have for obtaining
practical lawyering skills, but a clinical should not be used as a
substitute for other more challenging law school courses. I took the
Civil Rights Clinical, conducted by supervising attorneys Carter
"Cappy" White (<mailto:ccw...@ucdavis.edu >) and Professor Margaret
Johns (<mailto:mzj...@ucdavis.edu >). [Note: Cappy left King Hall
at the end of the Fall 1995 semester, and I am not personally
acquainted with his replacement.] As a Certified Student Attorney, I
represented pro se plaintiffs who had filed meritorious Section 1983
Civil Rights claims with the Eastern District Federal Court in
Sacramento and were assigned to the King Hall Civil Rights Clinic sua
sponte (the expertise of Certified Student Attorneys helps unclog the
court's calendar, which is overrun by the numerous plaintiffs who
appear in propria persona because they cannot afford an attorney).
I strongly recommend the Civil Rights Clinical for any law
student who is interested in any type of civil litigation. Litigation
is litigation is litigation, and the clinical puts its participants
through the paces of every stage of a typical lawsuit. I like to
think of it as "Applied Civil Procedure." Like all clinicals at King
Hall, the Civil Rights Clinical requires students to be in good
academic standing and become a Certified Student Attorney by applying
to the court before which they wish to practice (e.g., the Eastern
District Federal Court in Sacramento. This means that you must have
at least a 2.0 GPA and complete courses in Civil Procedure and
Evidence (concurrent enrollment in Evidence is permitted). Students
can enroll for upwards of two to six units of clinical credit, graded
on a Pass/No Pass basis, but the total number of students who can
enroll is limited, so sign up early.
In addition to the general requirements of other clinicals, the
Civil Rights Clinical requires students to complete a three unit
substantive course in Civil Rights (graded) and a two unit Skills
Seminar (Pass/No Pass), both of which are taught by Professor Johns,
although the substantive course was taught by an adjunct during the
Fall 1995 Semester. [Note: Most clinicals have specific academic
prerequisites. See the law school class information bulletin for more
information]. Many students take the substantive Civil Rights course
without taking the Civil Rights Clinical, but the Skills Seminar is an
integral part of the Civil Rights Clinical. All Certified Student
Attorneys in the Civil Rights Clinical must also attend a weekly one
hour meeting, much like an office meeting at a law firm.

4.2.3.3.2) What clinicals are available at King Hall?

King Hall sponsors legal clinicals for virtually every field of the
law. For more information on how to sign up for a clinical in a field
of law that interests you, contact Clinical Director Betsy Stewart
(<mailto:ejst...@ucdavis.edu >) at (916)752-6564.

4.2.3.4) PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY.

4.2.3.4.1) When should I take the required course in Professional
Responsibility?

Whenever it is convenient, but you need to pass this course to
graduate from King Hall. It is a one unit course graded on a Pass/No
Pass basis.

4.2.3.4.2) When should I take the Multistate Professional Responsibility
Exam (MPRE)?

Whenever it is convenient, but you need to pass the MPRE to become a
member of the bar in any U.S. jurisdiction. Application forms for the
MPRE can usually be found in the King Hall Registrar's Office.

4.2.3.5) Should I try to become a Course Tutor or Teacher's Assistant
(TA)?

Yes. It has tremendous resume value, and if you intend to teach law,
the experience is invaluable.

4.2.3.5.1) What is the difference between a Course Tutor and a TA?

Course Tutors are somewhat unique to King Hall. All first year
courses other than Legal Research and Legal Writing have Course
Tutors. There is also a Resource Tutor. Course Tutors are paid for
their time, and their job is to help students who ask for help in
their coursework. They tend to be very good students who did well in
whatever course they are tutoring.
In contrast to Course Tutors, TAs are unpaid positions for Legal
Research and Legal Writing. A law student who works as a TA receives
course credit. I had no desire to work as a Legal Research TA, but I
did work as a Legal Writing TA, and I found the experience very
rewarding, albeit extremely demanding on my patience and my time.

4.2.3.5.2) What are the qualifications necessary to become a Course Tutor
or TA?

Assistant Dean Toni Bernhard (<mailto:aeber...@ucdavis.edu >) is
responsible for hiring Course Tutors and TAs. Contact her at
(916)752-0243 for more information.

4.2.3.6) OTHER COURSES.

The faculty presents a forum every year to help second and third year
students make decisions about what courses that they should take. You
should attend this for the most current information available.
However, I do have some general and specific recommendations:

* You should include at least one skills class in your law
school education, such as Trial Practice or Negotiations.

* You should take advantage of the various classes that offer
a paper as an alternative to a final exam for two reasons:
First, instructors usually allow you to rewrite your paper
to bring up your grade; Second, this will give you a knock-
out writing sample, possibly of publishable quality.

* You should take Federal Income Taxation, regardless of your
career goals. This course is a prerequisite for many other
law school courses, and taxation principles are key
ingredients in any modern system of law.

* You should take most (but not all) courses that are
designated as courses that you need for the California Bar
Exam (Bar Exam). In addition, there are many courses that
are not specified as Bar Exam courses that are very helpful
in preparing you for the Bar Exam:

- Administrative Law (3 units) (taught by Professor
Arturo Gandara <mailto:agan...@ucdavis.edu >);

- Federal Jurisdiction (3 units) (taught by Professor
John B. Oakley <mailto:jboa...@ucdavis.edu >); and

- Law of Elections & Political Campaigns (2 units)
(taught by Professor Floyd Feeney
<mailto:fffe...@ucdavis.edu).

I have heard that Conflicts of Law (3 units) (taught by
Professor Fritz Jeunger) is also a helpful class in
preparing you for the Bar Exam. I couldn't fit it into my
schedule, so I wouldn't know. However, the July 1995
California Bar Exam did include a performance test based on
a conflicts of law issue.


4.2.3.7) SPECIAL PROGRAMS.

4.2.3.7.1) JOINT DEGREE PROGRAMS.

You can work towards a graduate degree in another department of U.C.
Davis while you earn your law degree (e.g., you can earn an M.B.A. at
the Graduate School of Management). If you chose to pursue such a
program, you would take all of your classes at King Hall during your
first year and after that divide your time up between classes at King
Hall and the classes that are required in your other discipline. You
would be required to file a separate application for the other program
and satisfy the admission requirements for that program.

4.2.3.7.2) TAKING COURSES OUTSIDE OF KING HALL FOR CREDIT TOWARDS THE
JURIS DOCTOR.

4.2.3.7.2.1) Can I take courses in other departments of U.C. Davis towards
and get credit towards my law degree at King Hall?

Yes, but there are limitations on how many you can take (in
combination with a number of other courses) and you must obtain
approval before you enroll in courses outside of the law school.
[Note: Whatever grades you earn in courses outside of the normal law
school curriculum at U.C. Davis will be converted to a Pass/No Pass
grade, and the standards for a passing grade in these classes are
higher than they are for non-law students.] Check with Assistant Dean
Bernhard (<mailto:aeber...@ucdavis.edu >) at (916)752-0243 for more
information.

4.2.3.7.2.2) Can I take courses at other colleges, universities, or law
schools for credit towards the Juris Doctor at King Hall?

Yes. In fact, many law students from King Hall attend other law
schools for a semester or more. However, there are specific academic
prerequisites and other requirements, both at King Hall and at the
other schools that help coordinate these programs. Check with
Assistant Dean Bernhard (<mailto:aeber...@ucdavis.edu >) for more
information at (916)752-0243.

4.2.4) COMPLETING THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE BAR.

Many requirements for admission to the California State Bar can be
completed during your second year of law school. Complete your Moral
Character Application ASAP. See Section 10.1 for more information
about these requirements.

- - - - -

End of document:

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 5 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >

Link to next document:

<http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part6.html >

Internet Esquire

unread,
Apr 9, 2004, 7:57:53 AM4/9/04
to
Archive-name: ucdavis/king-hall-faq/part4

Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Jun. 22, 1996
Version: 21Jun96 [ASCII/Multipart]
URL: <http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/ucdavis/
king-hall-faq/part4/faq.html >
Ebb: <http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part3.html >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 4 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ (King Hall USENET FAQ) may be comprised
of more than one part. If it is, please see the TABLE OF CONTENTS in Part

One for a complete list of the questions that have attempted to answer and


for other important legal information. Caveat emptor: I assume no

obligation for anyone through the publication of the King Hall USENET FAQ.


Furthermore, all versions of the King Hall USENET FAQ are my personal
property and are protected by applicable copyright laws. All rights are
reserved except as follows: I hereby give my permission to anyone who has
access to this version of the King Hall USENET FAQ to reproduce the
information contained herein for non-profit purposes, provided that proper
credit is given to me as the author of this FAQ and that I am promptly
notified of any use other than personal use. I may revoke permission to
reproduce any version of this FAQ at any time.

- - - - -

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 4 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996 by David F. Prenatt, Jr.

4.1.2.9) How important are the courses in Legal Research and Legal
Writing? [Rev]

You will probably not learn much in Legal Research (a one unit
course), but don't blow it off. Legal Research is the only "easy A"
at King Hall. [Note: The structure of Legal Research changed as of
Fall 1995, so it may no longer be an "easy A."] Legal Writing, on the
other hand, is probably the most difficult and important course you
will encounter during your first year at King Hall. In Legal Writing,
you will learn the skills that you need to be a good attorney. Thus,
you should take Legal Writing very seriously, even though it is only a
two unit course.
Legal Writing is a lightning rod for most law students at King
Hall. After coming to terms with their first semester grades, law
students must then endure the harsh criticism of the TAs who proofread
Legal Writing assignments. While some people tune in faster than
others, no one is naturally skilled at legal writing. Ironically, the
best writers suffer the most because they are so defensive about their
writing abilities. However, virtually everyone will eventually
acquire legal writing skills, leaving them to confront the harsh
realities of proper citation form.
The Bluebook is the standard for legal writing citation form in
most law schools. And while it is the first place that you should
look when you have a question on citation form, it is not the final
word on the subject. Once you have determined what the Bluebook
standard is, you must then consider the very real possibility that you
are the only person who is aware of that standard (at least the only
person that counts). Even so, you must learn the rules before you can
learn the exceptions.
The Bluebook is the most poorly organized reference book that I
have yet encountered. In most instances, you must check three
different sections of the Bluebook to determine which section contains
the information that you need, with each of these sections containing
a few cryptic clues that mean little or nothing by themselves.
Accordingly, you should get your own copy of the Bluebook and
incorporate your own handwritten cross-references in it.
On the inside covers of the Bluebook, you will find the "Quick
Reference" sections. Nothing could be more of an oxymoron, and
nothing could be further from the truth (if there is a de facto quick
reference section in the Bluebook, it is the "Practitioner's Notes" on
pp. 10-19). While the Bluebook contains virtually all of the answers
to your citation form questions, you must become intimately familiar
with the entire contents of the Bluebook before the "Quick Reference"
sections mean anything to you. The best place to start this process
is on page 21, Rule 1: Structure and Use of Citations. Keep reading
until page 53.
Once you have completed reading pages 21-53 of the Bluebook (and
think that you understand them), you are ready to begin cross-
referencing Short Citation Forms (Rule 4; pp. 39-42), Abbreviations,
Numerals, and Symbols (Rule 6; pp. 46-48), and Capitalization (Rule 8;
pp. 50-52). These Rules are context specific (i.e., text vs.
footnotes; court documents vs. law review articles), and they can be
trumped by the person to whom you are submitting your work. Every
teacher, law review, law office, and court has its own idea about what
constitutes proper citation form, specifically "parallel citations."
When you find an authority that you will be citing in your legal
writing, find out what the Bluebook says about proper citation form
first. Then, compare this information with the local rules, the local
local rules, and observed practice. Bring all of this information to
the attention of the person who makes the final decision about proper
citation form (i.e., your instructor/TA, your research editor, your
boss/senior partner, or the court clerk), and ask him or her how he or
she wants it done. Be prepared to change your citation form when
someone points out a rule or custom of which you were unaware.
This process may seem tedious, but proper citation form is
essential to the intellectual integrity of any and all legal writing.
Proper abbreviations and capitalization form also demonstrate an eye
for detail, and thus inspire confidence in the abilities of the person
who is familiar with these items. Most important, however, is the
fact that proper citation form facilitates automated cite checking,
keeping your legal authorities current and freeing up your time to do
more important things.

4.1.2.10) What if I decide that I don't want to go to law school anymore?

After you've started law school, it's too late to decide that you
don't want to go. Law school requires you to completely reorganize
your life, and once you have begun law school, you should complete it.
If you withdraw from law school, you will simply be throwing away good
opportunities for which you have already paid dearly. A law degree is
a good credential to have, even if you learn nothing from law school
other than that you don't want to be a lawyer.
Some people encounter a personal hardship that prevents them from
continuing with law school. If this happens to you, you might be able
to take some time off to set your life in order. Most people whom I
know who quit law school, however, do so because they are unhappy with
the heavy workload and/or the grades that they receive.
Law school is tedious and competitive for most people, but it
doesn't have to be that way at King Hall. Most students are able to
pass their classes at King Hall with a modicum of effort (i.e.,
attending class, reviewing course outlines, and practicing final
exams). The disappointment and tedium I witnessed in some of my more
ambitious and competitive colleagues was the result of their using
scholastic achievement as a measure of their self-worth (which is
always a mistake). As important as it may be to do well in law
school, it is much more important to finish law school.
During my first year of law school, I remember meeting a number
of accomplished and successful alumni/alumnae who had very mediocre
grades during law school. For example, Clint Bolick (King Hall Class
of 1982) told me and a number of other students that he had finished
in the top 10% "of the bottom half of the bottom half" of his class
before he went on to become the Vice President in Charge of Litigation
for the Institute For Justice in Washington, D.C. In other words, not
everyone can excel in law school, and a mediocre performance in law
school does not compromise your ability to make a name for yourself as
a lawyer. Many outstanding lawyers never even attended law school.

4.1.2.11) Can I repeat my courses?

King Hall does have some provisions for students who want to repeat a
course. Specifically, if your GPA drops below 2.0 at the end of your
first year, academic regulations require you to repeat many of your
first year courses if you wish to continue your legal education at
King Hall. Similarly, if you receive an F in a course (a very rare
occurrence) that is required for you to graduate, you must repeat that
course; if you receive an F in a course that is not a graduation
requirement, administrative regulations allow you to repeat that
course with the permission of the Assistant Dean. Contact Assistant
Dean Antonia Bernhard (<mailto:aeber...@ucdavis.edu >) at (916)752-
0243 for more information. Law school regulations do not state
whether you can repeat other courses, so before you repeat any other
courses check with Nicole Waterman ( <mailto:Ngwat...@ucdavis.edu >)


or Dian Francis (<mailto:dpfr...@ucdavis.edu >) in the King Hall

Registrar's Office, in person or at (916)752-4299.

4.1.2.12) Should I complain if I am unhappy with my instructor?

It depends upon why you are unhappy with your instructor. If you
think that your instructor is a bad teacher, that's a personal problem
that you need to address. I have never encountered a bad teacher that
someone else didn't like. On one occasion, the verdict on a visiting
adjunct professor was virtually unanimous in that no one felt that the
instructor was competent, and that professor was not invited back to
King Hall again.
If you are really unhappy with an instructor, you can usually
drop the class and take it when another professor is teaching it. If
you need the class, however, that is a trade-off that you may need to
make. In any event, the grade distribution remains pretty standard.
The administration at King Hall is very concerned about the
quality of instruction. Thus, you are given the opportunity to fill
out anonymous instructor evaluations at the end of every semester. I
have never turned in a bad evaluation for an instructor, but many
other people whom I know have, and in many instances they have come to
regret it when they realize that they actually did learn a great deal
from that professor. Keep in mind that sometimes the subject matter
of a particular course defies the capacity of an instructor to
spoonfeed his or her students.
Most of the people whom I know who complain about the quality of
a professor's teaching think that they know more about the subject
than the professor or think that they know more about how the subject
should be taught than the professor does. I have felt this way myself
at times. On very rare occasions I have come to the conclusion that
attending some law school classes was a complete waste of time and
that I learned certain subjects in spite of my instructors rather than
from them. However, I still attended all of my law school classes
religiously, in case an instructor passed out a "silver bullet" that
would help me on the final exam.


4.1.3) OTHER THINGS TO CONSIDER AS A FIRST YEAR LAW STUDENT.

4.1.3.1) Registration with the Committee of Bar Examiners.

First year law students who intend to practice law in the state of
California after graduation must register with the Committe of Bar
Examiners shortly after they begin law school. You will find forms
for this in the Registrar's Office. Take care of this as soon as
possible to avoid late fees.

4.1.3.2) Where should I buy my books and supplies?

You should be able to obtain all of your books and supplies at the
Silo Bookstore. However, you can probably find the books you need
elsewhere for less. For instance, America's Legal and Professional
Bookstores at 725 J St in nearby Sacramento, (916)441-0410, does a
greater volume than the Silo. You should also post a list somewhere
in the law school of the books that you want to buy and watch for
lists that other people post of the books that they are selling.

4.1.3.2.1) Should I sign up for a bar review course during my first year
of law school?

Yes, even if you don't plan to take the bar exam. When you sign up
for a bar review course, you will obtain free outlines of your first
year courses that will help you in preparing for your final exams.
You may also be able to get a free bar review course by becoming a
sales representative for one of the courses.

4.1.3.2.2) Which bar review course should I purchase?

Most people purchase BarBri or Barpassers [Note: Barpassers has been
purchased by Wests and renamed]. Given the choice, I signed up for
Barpassers and later became a sales representative for Barpassers. My
preference should be obvious, but both of these courses are very good
courses. Check out all of the courses on the market and decide for
yourself which one is best for you. Some people whom I know even
signed up for both BarBri and Barpassers to obtain all of the outlines
that both courses offered and/or to play the two vendors against each
other on course price.

4.1.3.3) FINDING SUMMER WORK.

4.1.3.3.1) How do I find summer work?

Send out resumes to firms, government agencies, etc. that interest
you, and do so promptly (ABA regulations prohibit you from doing so
until close to the end of your first semester, so just get your resume
in order). Summer jobs for first year law students go very fast. For
more information, Contact Director of Career Services Jane Thomson
(<mailto:jtho...@ucdavis.edu >) at (916)752-6574. Of course, she
probably won't be interested in talking to you until sometime around
November of your first year.

4.1.3.3.2) What if I can't find paid work?

Volunteer. You may also be able to find a fellowship to help you pay
your way. The King Hall Legal Foundation provides a number of grants
specifically for such purposes. One advantage of volunteering for
summer work after your first year of law school is that you will not
compromise the amount of your financial aid award during your third
year. For more information, contact the King Hall Financial Aid
Director Lu Reed Bastian (<mailto:lrba...@ucdavis.edu >) in person
or at (916)752-6573.

4.1.3.3.3) Are there any career planning resources on the Internet? [New]

Yes. See Section 4.6.5 for information on career planning resources
on the Internet.

4.1.3.4) SOCIAL LIFE AT KING HALL.

4.1.3.4.1) Is it a bad idea to date other law students?

Yes. Problems will arise even in the best relationships. When they
do, your classmates will become involved, and everyone will get hurt.
Moreover, most romantic relationships in law school do not last. When
your former lover is a law student, you must confront him or her every
day while you are in law school, not to mention the fact that you will
probably know most of your classmates for over 40 years.
The small size of the King Hall community makes dating your
fellow law students even more complicated. Consider that when Version
1.1 of this FAQ was posted on the King Hall dayboard, some anonymous
smart aleck crossed out the word "date" in this question and wrote in
the word "stalk." Res ipsa loquitor.
Unfortunately, most of you will ignore and/or attempt to refute
what I have written in this section. And undoubtedly there will be
many of you who will enter into committed relationships with other law
students shortly after you arrive at King Hall. And many of those
relationships will flourish long after your departure from King Hall.
But keep in mind that most of the law school relationships that do
fail will fail miserably and quietly, so be modest about whatever
success you do encounter in your romantic relationships with your
fellow law students.

4.1.3.4.2) How do I avoid gossip at King Hall?

You can't, and you are foolish to try. People exchange a lot of
information in law school, and gossip is included with this
information. However, you can avoid repeating unkind and unflattering
gossip. And if you exercise discretion, you will be amazed at the
quantity and quality of information that people will share with you.
As cynical as I am, one of the things that never ceases to amaze
me is how two-faced some people can be. I don't pretend to pass
judgement on these people, however. In fact, I depend upon the
duplicity of many of my good friends to gain the trust of people who
wish me ill. On the other hand, the only reason that any of these
people trust me is because they know that I will not reveal what I
know or how I know it unless compelled to do so by the law or my
professional ethics. As a result, I always knew what people were
saying about me and who was saying it.

4.1.3.4.3) What do I do if people spread a vicious rumor about me that is
untrue?

There is very little that you can do about vicious rumors about
yourself at King Hall. In any small community there are ignorant
busybodies who falsely believe themselves to be among the enlightened
and well-informed. King Hall is no exception. Generally speaking,
these people have lives of their own that are so mediocre or tragic
that they must poison the reputations of others to boost their own
self-esteem.
Don't think for a moment that there is honor among these gossips.
After all, knowledge is power and power corrupts, so the malcontents
who chime in today about your common enemy will tell tales out of
school about you tomorrow. If you are the victim of idle gossip,
straighten out the record with your close personal friends; they will
take care of the rest when you are not around.
The term idle gossip is difficult to define. After all, it's a
matter of perspective. If you are among the enlightened and well-
informed and your sources are reliable, then you are performing a
valuable community service as a purveyor of accurate information. On
the other hand, if you are an unwitting victim of hidden agendas
(i.e., most of us), you are receiving incomplete and inaccurate
information from your sources, and you will do irreparable harm to the
reputation of others when you repeat a rumor.
I always asked myself three questions about any rumor that I
heard at King Hall:

1) Is it kind?,

2) Is it true?, and

3) Is it necessary to repeat it?

Even when you repeat the truth, you can intrude upon people's personal
lives. This makes enemies out of people who would otherwise be your
friends and who would be willing to help you when you need help the
most (and you never know who or when that will be).
Gossips are the worst kind of false friends. None of the secrets
that you share with them are confidential. On the other hand, silence
is a friend that will never betray you.

4.1.3.4.4) What should I do if I experience some form of harassment at
King Hall, sexual or otherwise?

Depending upon the seriousness of the situation, you should file a
grievance with the administration at King Hall. I experienced
harassment myself at King Hall, sexual and otherwise, and I learned
that even the nicest people can sometimes be very vicious. In most
instances, I was able to resolve it informally. I simply confided in
someone whom I knew I could trust about what I was experiencing
(preferably someone in a position of authority who could later be used
as a mediator if necessary) and steered clear of the perpetrator until
he or she offered me an apology or explanation (or until he or she
started treating me with respect and consideration). Avoiding a
perpetrator, however, is not always a viable option in a small, close-
knit community like King Hall, and a formal grievance may be in order.
Just as important as what to do when you experience some form of
harassment is how to conduct yourself if you are accused of being a
perpetrator. Unfortunately, one person's good clean fun or harmless
flirtation is another person's harassment. If you find out that you
have done anything to offend anyone at King Hall, even if it is just a
misunderstanding, you should apologize IMMEDIATELY to that person and
avoid him or her from that point forward.
The people whom I have met at King Hall are typically very
forgiving. In most instances, they will appreciate a courteous
apology and extend an olive branch to you once they have cooled off.
Depending upon the seriousness of the situation, however, you should
also consider seeking legal advice. Whether or not you think that you
have done anything wrong, law school types can be very litigious.
My experience with both perpetrators and victims of harassment
who have confided in me has led me to believe that there is no
reliable method of divining who is telling the truth. Liars can be
very convincing (more so than honest people), and you certainly cannot
trust the many rumors that abound because most people (law students
included) have an insatiable appetite for vicious gossip. The more
that people talk about a situation involving some form of harassment,
the more lurid and convoluted the rumors get. Many innocent people
are falsely accused (a form of harassment itself), and many actual
victims of harassment are not believed (which adds insult to injury);
sometimes the roles of victim and perpetrator are even reversed in the
retelling. Worse yet, many perpetrators get away with harassment when
there is no doubt about what actually happened (i.e., the victim is
blamed for inviting or creating a situation or for overreacting).

4.1.3.4.5) What do One Ls do for fun?

There are a large number of social gatherings every month, if not
every week (every day, if you live in the dorms), most with alcoholic
beverages as the main attraction (notwithstanding the University's
prohibition on advertising on campus the fact that alcohol will be
served at an event). Many law student organizations have potlucks as
well. But by far the biggest social activity is amateur sports. A
large number of law students are former college athletes (some better
than others). Volleyball, softball, and basketball seem to be the
most popular law school team sports; a softball league usually forms
during the first month of classes. And yes, skill is optional.

4.1.3.5) MOOT COURT.

4.1.3.5.1) Moot Court Clerking.

One Ls are usually invited by the Moot Court Board to act as time
keepers during oral arguments. This is an excellent opportunity for
One Ls to find out what Moot Court is all about.

4.1.3.5.2) Moot Court Team Tryouts.

Notwithstanding the year long Appellate Advocacy program, One Ls may
qualify for various moot court teams at the end of their first year
for participation on these teams during their second year. Watch for
bulletins about the various moot court team tryouts.

- - - - -

End of document:

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 4 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >

Link to next document:

<http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part5.html >

Internet Esquire

unread,
Apr 9, 2004, 7:57:54 AM4/9/04
to
Archive-name: ucdavis/king-hall-faq/part7

Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Jun. 22, 1996
Version: 21Jun96 [ASCII/Multipart]
URL: <http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/ucdavis/
king-hall-faq/part7/faq.html >
Ebb: <http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part6.html >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 7 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ (King Hall USENET FAQ) may be comprised
of more than one part. If it is, please see the TABLE OF CONTENTS in Part
One for a complete list of the questions that I have attempted to answer
and for other important legal information. Caveat emptor: I assume no
obligation to anyone through the publication of the King Hall USENET FAQ.
Furthermore, all versions of the King Hall USENET FAQ are my personal
property and are protected by applicable copyright laws. All rights are
reserved except as follows: I hereby give my permission to anyone who has
access to this version of the King Hall USENET FAQ to reproduce the
information contained herein for non-profit purposes, provided that proper
credit is given to me as the author of this FAQ and that I am promptly
notified of any use other than personal use. I may revoke permission to
reproduce any version of this FAQ at any time.

- - - - -

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 7 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996 by David F. Prenatt, Jr.

5) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT LIFE AT U.C. DAVIS FROM MEMBERS OF THE
KING HALL COMMUNITY.

I have included general information about life at U.C. Davis in this
section that is of special interest to members of the King Hall
community. For more complete information on U.C. Davis, see the U.C.
Davis USENET FAQ (see Section 1.5 for information on how to obtain the
U.C. Davis USENET FAQ). Interested parties can also use the U.C.
Davis Gopher (<gopher://gopher.ucdavis.edu/ >) or visit the U.C. Davis
Home Page on the World Wide Web (<http://www.ucdavis.edu/ >).

5.1) Where can I get something to eat on or near the U.C. Davis campus?

There are two places to eat on campus that are within walking distance
of the law school: The Silo and the Coffee House (the Silo is a
little closer to the law school than the Coffee House).

5.1.1) What kind of food can I get at the Silo?

There are several fast food restaurants at the Silo, and the Silo Pub
serves a good sit-down lunch.

5.1.2) What kind of food can I get at the Coffee House?

The Coffee House has quite a variety of foods prepared the way you
like them.

5.2) What sort of activities are there on the U.C. Davis campus?

Movies, plays, concerts, sporting events, etc. See the U.C. Davis
USENET FAQ for more information (see Section 1.5 for information on


how to obtain the U.C. Davis USENET FAQ).

5.3) SPECIAL EVENTS ON THE U.C. DAVIS CAMPUS.

5.3.1) Picnic Day.

Picnic Day is an annual day long festival that takes place at U.C.
Davis on a Saturday during April. Every department of the university
participates and sponsors special events. King Hall sponsors the
Neumiller competition on Picnic Day which features oral arguments
between the top two Moot Court teams from the year long Appellate
Advocacy program.

5.3.2) The Whole Earth Festival.

The Whole Earth Festival, described by one ucd.life commentator as the
"U.C. Davis Freak Show," is a week long event sponsored by the
Experimental College. It can best be described as a celebration of
alternate lifestyles that centers around environmental awareness (for
better or for worse).

6) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT LIFE IN DAVIS FROM THE MEMBERS OF THE
KING HALL COMMUNITY.

I have included general information about life in Davis that is of
special interest to members of the King Hall community. For more
complete information about life in Davis, see the Davis USENET FAQ
(see Section 1.5 for information on how to obtain the Davis USENET
FAQ).

6.1) How can I find a place to live in Davis?

There is no shortage of housing in Davis whatsoever. Just pick up a
newspaper or the Housing Viewpoint which is distributed at various
locations on campus. However, keep in mind that Davis is a college
town, so you must plan ahead. One year leases that begin in the fall
quarter are the standard, and prudent renters usually sign their
leases a few months ahead of time in the spring rental season. See
the Davis USENET FAQ for more information (see Section 1.5 for
information on how to obtain the Davis USENET FAQ).

6.2) Where can I get something to eat in Davis?

It depends upon what kind of food you want. Davis has a few zillion
pizza restaurants, quite a few Chinese restaurants, a handful of fast
food restaurants, and a smattering of just about any type of cuisine
you might want to sample. See the Davis USENET FAQ for more
information (see Section 1.5 for information on how to obtain the
Davis USENET FAQ).

6.3) What sort of entertainment is there in Davis?

Quite a bit for such a small town. Everything from pool halls/night
clubs to live theatre. See the Davis USENET FAQ for more information
(see Section 1.5 for information on how to obtain the Davis USENET
FAQ).

6.4) What sort of transportation services are available in Davis?

The most popular form of transportation in Davis is the bicycle.
There are also two public bus services with several routes in Davis,
Yolobus 1-(800)-371-877 [TDD (916)371-3077] and UNITRANS (916) 752-
BUSS; the few taxi services that do exist are almost always
unavailable. If you are going out of town, you can take your own car
(or rent one) or use Greyhound, Amtrak, or the nearby airport.
Commuter services are also available.

6.4.1) How far is the airport from Davis and how do I get there?

The Sacramento Metropolitan Airport is about 20 miles from downtown
Davis. From Davis, head north on Hwy 113 or Rd 102 (Pole Line Rd)
until you reach I-5. Take I-5 South towards Sacramento. You can't
miss the airport.
If you are coming to Davis from the airport on I-5 North, be
careful not to miss the Davis exit at Rd 102. It is not very well
marked. Take Rd 102 Southbound until you reach Davis. You can't miss
Davis.
If you miss Rd 102, you will reach Hwy 113, which is very well
marked. If you do reach Hwy 113 by mistake, take it south to Davis.
It's quicker than doubling back to Rd 102, and perhaps missing your
exit a second time.

6.4.1.1) Where should I park at the Sacramento Metropolitan Airport?

Short term parking is usually available near the terminal of your
airline for 75 cents for the first half hour, $1.50 per hour to a
maximum daily rate of $10; long term parking is $1.50 per hour up to a
maximum daily rate of $5. Circle around the airport once before
parking to make sure that you know where you are going once you park.

6.4.1.2) Is there a shuttle service from Davis to the Sacramento
Metropolitan Airport?

Yes. The Davis Airporter provides 24 hour service to the Sacramento
Airport (reservations are required) at a discount for U.C. Davis
students (proof of registration is required). Check with the Davis
Airporter at (916)756-6715 for more information. [Note: Other
companies provide shuttle service to the Sacramento Airport, but I
have not had occasion to use them.]

6.4.1.3) Where can I get more information about the Sacramento
Metropolitan Airport?

Call the Metro's BeeLine at (916)552-5252 or write:

Department of Airports
6900 Airport Blvd
Sacramento, CA 95837

Be sure to ask for the Bi-Monthly Flight Schedule. [Note: Readers
with a web browser may wish to visit the Southwest Airlines Home Page
on the World Wide Web (<http://www.iflyswa.com/ >)].

6.4.2) Are there any shuttle services for commuters from outlying areas?

Yes. The UCD/UCDMC Shuttle runs hourly between U.C. Davis and the
U.C. Davis Medical Center in Sacramento Monday through Friday and the
Intracampus Bus connects U.C. Davis and U.C. Berkeley. Contact Fleet
Services at 752-8287 for more information. Reduced parking fees and
preferential parking are available for carpools, and a number of other
incentives are offered for those interested in other transportation
options. For more information, contact TAPS at (916)752-MILE or visit
the TAPS office on Extension Center Dr.

6.4.3) Amtrak. [Rev]

Readers with a web browser may visit Amtrak's Home Page on the World
Wide Web (<http://www.amtrak.com/ >). Amtrak's Capitol Route is an
affordable and pleasant way to reach the Bay Area, but the trains do
not run on time. Make sure that you allow for plenty of time to reach
your destination.

6.5) LOCAL DAVIS BUSINESSES.

6.5.1) Is there an honest auto mechanic in Davis?

Check the Davis USENET FAQ for more information (see Section 1.5 for
information on how to obtain the Davis USENET FAQ).

6.5.2) What banks serve the Davis area?

In alphabetical order: Bank of America, Business & Professional Bank,
First Interstate Bank, First Northern Bank, Golden 1 Credit Union,
Sacramento Savings Bank, University & State Employees Credit Union
(USE <http://www.usecu.org/ >), Union Bank, U.S. Bank, Wells Fargo
Bank (<http://www.wellsfargo.com/ >), World Savings and Loan
Association, and Yolo Federal Credit Union. IMHO, USE offers the most
affordable and best range of banking services in Davis and elsewhere,
and any U.C. Davis student or alumnus can join USE.

6.5.3) Where can I find a bike shop in Davis?

It is hard to avoid a bike shop in Davis. There are over 2.1 bikes
per person in Davis, and a corresponding number of bike shops.
However, there are only two bike shops in Davis that are on the World
Wide Web:

Wheelworks (<http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~bicycles/ >)

B & L Bike Shope (<http://virtual-markets.net/vme/blbike/ >)

6.6) LOCAL POLITICS.

6.6.1) Davis, California = No smoking zone.

There is no smoking in Davis by city ordinance. Not in any business
establishment nor within 20 feet of any business establishment. The
only place you can smoke is in your own home.

6.6.2) Davis, California = No snoring zone.

There is no noise pollution in Davis by city ordinance. This law was
meant to prevent people from having a loud party, but the Davis Police
department also enforced it against a woman whose neighbor complained
that she snored too loud. The case made national headlines.

6.6.3) Davis, California = No malling zone.

For years, citizens of Davis have resisted efforts by developers to
build a shopping mall. As a result, most people must travel to
Woodland, Dixon, or Sacramento to find a department store.

6.7) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE SMALL COMMUNITIES NEIGHBORING
DAVIS FROM MEMBERS OF THE KING HALL COMMUNITY.

See the Davis USENET FAQ for information about the small communities
neighboring Davis (see Section 1.5 for information on how to obtain
the Davis USENET FAQ).

7) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE GREATER SACRAMENTO AREA FROM
MEMBERS OF THE KING HALL COMMUNITY.

I have provided general information in this section about the Greater
Sacramento Area that is of special interest to the members of the King
Hall community in the section below. For more complete information,
see the Sacramento USENET FAQ; see Section 1.5 for information on how
to obtain the Sacramento USENET FAQ.

7.1) What reasons would a member of the King Hall community have to visit
the Greater Sacramento Area?

Many members of the King Hall community live, work, shop, and play in
Sacramento, the state capital, which is approximately 20 miles East of
Davis on Interstate 80 (I-80).

7.2) How do I get to Sacramento from U.C. Davis?

Take I-80 East. You will see the Sacramento skyline from miles away,
but the freeway interchanges are somewhat confusing. If you are going
to downtown Sacramento, take Route 50/Business 80. There will be a
long transition road that goes over the Sacramento drawbridge into
downtown Sacramento. Alternatively, Yolobus provides one of the most
reliable and convenient bus services that I have ever encountered.
For Davis commuters, it is usually cheaper and faster than driving to
Sacramento, especially when you factor in parking.

8) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT NORTHERN CALIFORNIA FROM MEMBERS OF
THE KING HALL COMMUNITY.

I have included general information in this section about Northern
California that is of special interest to members of the King Hall
community. For more complete information about Northern California,
please see the California USENET FAQ [currently under construction] or
one of the FAQs mentioned in the subsections below.

8.1) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT WINE COUNTRY FROM MEMBERS OF THE
KING HALL COMMUNITY.

8.1.1) What reasons would a member of the King Hall community have to
visit Wine Country?

At least one member of the King Hall community lives in Wine Country,
which is approximately 30 miles west of Davis (and another 30 miles to
drive from one end to the other). It is a popular destination for
weekend excursions (i.e., shopping, wine tasting, etc.) because of its
worldwide reputation as the most fertile ground for viticulture (i.e.,
the cultivation of grapes). But don't take my word for it when you
can visit the Napa Valley Home Page on the World Wide Web.

<http://www.freerun.com/ >


8.1.2) How do I get to Wine Country from Davis?

Go West on I-80; exit at Route 12 West. After that, you will have to
make a decision as to what your final destination will be. If it's
your first trip to the Wine Country, I suggest that you tour the Napa
Valley.
Take Route 29 North all the way north to Calistoga and work your
way back down South. This will take you through the heart of the Napa
Valley. You may wish to visit the following local attractions on your
way south from Calistoga:

* Calistoga Springs: The name Calistoga has an interesting
etymology. It was a spoonerism of a 19th Century visitor to
the mineral baths in the area who meant to say that the
region would someday be known as the Saratoga Springs of
California. It came out something like, "Calistoga Springs
of Sarifornia."

* Sterling Vineyards: The major attraction at Sterling is the
aerial tram (the complimentary wine tasting is at best
mediocre; if you want taste some good wine at Sterling, you
will have to pay to taste their private reserves).

* Beaulieu ["bowl-lou"] Vineyards (BV): Of all the vineyards
that I have visited in the Napa Valley, BV gives by far the
best reception to visitors. And as far as complimentary
wine tasting goes, BV's Cabernet Sauvignon is consistently
the best; BV's private reserves will please even the most
discriminating palette.

For those of you who have unlimited funds, you may wish to make
reservations on the Wine Train. While many local residents consider
the Wine Train a nuisance, the Wine Train is probably the best way for
visitors to see the entire Napa Valley in one day.

8.2) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA FROM
MEMBERS OF THE KING HALL COMMUNITY.

I have provided information about the San Francisco Bay Area that is
of special interest to the members of the King Hall community in this
section. For more complete information on the San Francisco Bay Area,
see the San Francisco Bay Area USENET FAQ (see Section 1.5 for
information on how to obtain the San Francisco Bay Area USENET FAQ).

8.2.1) What reasons would a member of the King Hall community have to
visit the San Francisco Bay Area?

A large cross-section of the King Hall community lives and works in
the San Francisco Bay Area, which is approximately 80 miles southwest
of Davis. Unlike the small town of Davis, the San Francisco Bay Area
is the most well established metropolitan area on the West Coast.
Smaller in size and population than the Los Angeles metropolitan area
and Southern California, the San Francisco Bay Area has a worldwide
reputation in fine arts and culture.

8.2.2) How do I get to the San Francisco Bay Area from Davis?

Take I-80 West. It will take you to downtown San Francisco. Be sure
to bring along a few dollar bills and/or quarters to pay for tolls and
parking, and get good directions on how to reach your ultimate
destination in the San Francisco Bay Area.

8.3) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT LAKE TAHOE FROM MEMBERS OF THE KING
HALL COMMUNITY.

8.3.1) What reasons would a member of the King Hall community have for
visiting Lake Tahoe?

Lake Tahoe, which is situated on the border of California and Nevada
about 100 miles east of Davis, is one of the most popular recreational
spots for King Hall students.

8.3.2) How do I get to Lake Tahoe from U.C. Davis?

Take I-80 East to the 50/Business 80 Route; stay on Route 50. You
can't miss Lake Tahoe.

8.4) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT MISCELLANEOUS LOCATIONS IN THE
NORTHERN CALIFORNIA AREA BY MEMBERS OF THE KING HALL COMMUNITY.

8.4.1) Are there any other places of interest in Northern California
besides the ones you have listed?

Yes. Northern California has many educational, commercial, and
recreational centers that members of the King Hall community
frequently visit. For instance, California State University, Chico to
the North and the Redwood Coast to the East.

8.4.2) How can I get more information on these other places of interest?

See the California USENET FAQ [currently under construction].

9) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT LIFE IN CALIFORNIA FROM MEMBERS OF THE
KING HALL COMMUNITY.

I have included general information in this section about California
that is of special interest to the members of the King Hall community.
For more complete information, please see the California USENET FAQ
[currently under construction].

9.1) How do I become a California resident?

See the current U.C. Davis General Catalog for information on
California residency. California residents enjoy a cheaper education
at U.C. Davis than out of state residents, and most of the students at
Davis are California residents.

9.2) What places of interest are there in California?

See the California USENET FAQ [currently under construction] for more
information on places of interest in California.

- - - - -

End of document:

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 7 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >

Link to next document:

<http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part8.html >

Internet Esquire

unread,
Apr 9, 2004, 7:57:55 AM4/9/04
to
Archive-name: ucdavis/king-hall-faq/part8

Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Jun. 22, 1996
Version: 21Jun96 [ASCII/Multipart]
URL: <http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/ucdavis/
king-hall-faq/part8/faq.html >
Ebb: <http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part7.html >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 8 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ (King Hall USENET FAQ) may be comprised
of more than one part. If it is, please see the TABLE OF CONTENTS in Part
One for a complete list of the questions that I have attempted to answer
and for other important legal information. Caveat emptor: I assume no
obligation to anyone through the publication of the King Hall USENET FAQ.
Furthermore, all versions of the King Hall USENET FAQ are my personal
property and are protected by applicable copyright laws. All rights are
reserved except as follows: I hereby give my permission to anyone who has
access to this version of the King Hall USENET FAQ to reproduce the
information contained herein for non-profit purposes, provided that proper
credit is given to me as the author of this FAQ and that I am promptly
notified of any use other than personal use. I may revoke permission to
reproduce any version of this FAQ at any time.

- - - - - The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 8 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996 by David F. Prenatt, Jr.

10) LIFE AFTER KING HALL.

Hard on the heels of the King Hall graduation ceremony is the
beginning of the various bar review courses. But before that time,
students usually make preparations for admission to the California
State Bar or other post-graduation plans.

10.1) ADMISSION TO THE CALIFORNIA STATE BAR.

Admission to the California State Bar for King Hall graduates requires
a positive moral character evaluation from the California Committee of
Bar Examiners, a passing grade on the Multistate Professional
Responsibility Exam (MPRE), and a passing grade on the California Bar
Exam.

10.1.1) THE CALIFORNIA BAR EXAM.

The California Bar Exam (Bar Exam) is a three day exam that takes
place every year during July on the last Tuesday, Wednesday, and
Thursday of that month; similarly the February exam takes place on the
last Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday of that month. The first and
third days of the Bar Exam are comprised of three essay exams each
morning, and a "performance test" each afternoon; the second day of
the Bar Exam is comprised entirely of the multiple choice Multistate
Bar Examination (MBE). The MBE is the key to passing the Bar Exam.
The scores on essays and performance tests change in the multi-phase
grading process, and are only predictable in that they gravitate
towards the mean, regardless of the quality of the individual essays
and performance tests. In striking contrast, the answers to each MBE
question are either right or wrong, and you will receive full credit
for a correct answer or no credit at all for an incorrect answer
(notwithstanding "scaling").
More often than not, a good MBE score will make up for mediocre
performances on Bar Exam essay questions and performance tests, and a
mediocre MBE score will prevent otherwise qualified students from
passing the Bar Exam; many bar applicants do not even complete the
MBE. MBE questions tend to focus on obscure rules of law that mislead
even the best and brightest law students. There are 200 of these
multiple choice questions on the first and third days of the exam that
must be answered in six hours (100 questions in each of the three hour
morning sessions and 100 questions in each of the three hour afternoon
sessions for a total of 400 questions). These questions are drawn
from six subjects: Contracts, Torts, Criminal Law & Procedure,
Evidence, Real Property, and Constitutional Law. At the present time,
the number of questions drawn from each subject varies. However, the
number of questions from each subject will be equalized by 1997.

10.1.1.1) Qualifying for the Bar Exam.

Graduates of King Hall are qualified to take the Bar Exam based on
their graduation from King Hall, an ABA approved law school.

10.1.1.2) Submitting an Application to Take the Bar Exam.

You must submit an application towards the end of your last semester
of law school to take the Bar Exam. The application is very easy to
complete, but there is a very small window for when you can apply.
Obtain a passport photo well in advance and keep it on hand.

10.1.1.3) Preparing for the Bar Exam.

Preparing for the Bar Exam is much like taking another semester of law
school, only you have tests every single day. While you should attend
your substantive lectures, the best way to prepare for taking a test
is to take practice tests. Thus, you should review essay questions
from previous Bar Exams and practice MBE questions until they are
coming out of your ears.
The following characteristic similarities and differences occur
in the six MBE subjects:

* Evidence and Torts required a holistic approach to the law
(i.e., these subjects test your comprehensive knowledge of
the underlying legal principles and policies addressed by
the subject matter);

* Contracts, Criminal Law & Procedure, and Real Property
required a fact specific approach to the law (i.e., these
subjects test your in-depth knowledge of case law as opposed
to your general knowledge of the legal principles and
policies addressed by the subject matter);

* Constitutional Law required a context-based approach to the
law (i.e., this subject tests your knowledge of legal
principles and policies as well as your in-depth knowledge
of case law, but more than anything this subject calls upon
your ability to make hard judgement calls by empathizing
with the people who wrote the MBE questions and second-
guessing their highly subjective interpretation of the law).

Your strengths and weaknesses in each MBE subject will become apparent
as you practice MBE questions. Plan your studies accordingly.
Contrary to popular belief, your law school alma mater and class
standing have no statistical significance as to whether you will pass
the Bar Exam. Because of the importance given to the MBE, your
ability to pass the Bar Exam was determined by the time you applied to
law school (i.e., it depends primarily upon your ability to perform
well on standardized tests such as the LSAT). The good news is that
you can acquire this ability through rigorous study if you do not come
by it naturally, provided that you are properly motivated; a number of
students supplement their commercial bar preparation courses with the
Professional Multistate Bar Review (PMBR). Even if you do come by
testing skills naturally, the substance and format of various MBE
subjects and questions are sui generis, so even the best test takers
should practice thousands of MBE questions.
It's best to think of the MBE as six separate exams merged into
one. Questions for each of the six subjects tested are developed by
separate committees within the National Conference of Bar Examiners in
association with the American College Testing Service (i.e., there are
no "crossover questions"). Most of the winning test taking strategies
are not portable from subject to subject, so focus on those subjects
that give you the most trouble. You will probably find that you are
simply trying to force a square peg into a round hole.

10.1.1.4) Taking the Bar Exam.

Taking the Bar Exam is nowhere near as bad as most people expect it to
be. As one of my colleagues put it, "the Bar Exam tests for minimal
competency." Even so, some of the brightest people whom I know have
had to take the Bar Exam more than once because of overconfidence and
a lack of proper motivation.
Contrary to popular belief, your chances of passing the Bar Exam
actually go up on your second attempt. If you fail the Bar Exam
twice, however, you are quite likely to keep failing it over and over
again (hence, the abysmal passage rate for repeat takers). Many
people do not know what to expect from the Bar Exam until they
actually take it, so they don't know how to prepare for it, mentally
or emotionally. The Bar Exam is very passable, however, and there are
a lot of things that people know to do differently when preparing to
take it a second time.
Many capable people do everything that they should do to pass the
Bar Exam and still fail. As hard as they may study, some unforeseen
circumstance occurs. For example, for those who type or word process
the Bar Exam, mechanical failure is a very real possibility (one
person was gone by lunch the first day), and the Committee of Bar
Examiners does not take responsibility for power outages. So if you
type the Bar Exam, bring a second typewriter--a manual typewriter.

10.1.1.5) Waiting for Your Results from the California Bar Exam.

The worst part about taking the California Bar Exam is waiting for
your results. Even if you could be sure that you had passed, your
career is on hold for several months. If you already have a job lined
up, this is not as much of a problem, but at least one person whom I
know has lost his or her job as an attorney when he or she failed the
Bar Exam [Hearsay alert: This may not have been the proximate cause].
Prepare yourself for a long wait after you take the Bar Exam and
make plans for what you will do if you do not pass the first time. If
you fail the California Bar Exam, your colleagues at King Hall will
most certainly find out about it. A small group of unemployed
individuals who have nothing better to do will cross reference the
published list of those people who passed the Bar Exam with those
people who were known to have taken it. These busybodies will also
use this information to determine your class ranking and make banal
resolutions about your scholastic abilities. If you pass the Bar Exam
immediately after you graduate or don't even take it, you will simply
become a face in the crowd.

10.1.1.6) Post Mortem on the Results of the California Bar Exam.

For 94.7% of the 1994 King Hall graduates who took the California Bar
Exam in July of 1994, the waiting and worrying about whether they had
passed was over in mid-November of that year (an all time record, even
for King Hall). For many of my classmates from the subsequent Class
of 1995, this knowledge gave them an overwhelming sense of confidence
going into the July 1995 Bar Exam. Indeed, almost everyone I met in
the legal community of the greater Sacramento Area assumed that
everyone from King Hall would automatically pass the Bar Exam.
I address these comments to those people who are part of the slim
percentage at King Hall who do not pass the Bar Exam the first time
that they take it and to all those other Bar Examinees who try their
best and fail. No doubt everyone will assure you that if you did well
in law school and/or attended King Hall that you will pass the Bar
Exam the first time that you take it. Such is not the case. The
truth is that if you prepare properly for the Bar Exam, you will
probably pass no matter where you studied the law or how well you did
in law school; if not the first time you take the exam, then the
second. And the most important thing to focus on when you are putting
forth your best effort is a thought that a kindred soul shared with me
regarding his attempt at the July 1995 Exam: "This is my Bar Exam, no
one else's."
Failing at something as significant as the Bar Exam truly sucks,
all the more so because it very seldom happens to someone who has
prepared for it properly. It also comes as quite a surprise to those
people who have every reason to be confident in themselves and in
their abilities, erroneously believing that they have done what they
needed to do to prepare. It comes as an even bigger surprise to their
friends and family. There are many good explanations that are offered
for why capable people fail the Bar Exam, but there really is no such
thing as a good excuse. At the same time, you don't need an
explanation or an excuse. You simply need to take the Bar Exam until
you pass.

10.1.1.7) Information for Unsuccessful Applicants.

For those Bar Examinees who do not appear on the published pass list,
the Commmittee of Bar Examiners sends out a notice and encloses a
brochure entitled, "Information for Unsuccessful Applicants." This
notice includes information that should help you figure out why you
did not pass the Bar Exam. If you passed the Bar Exam, of course,
this information is somewhat unimportant. But for "Unsuccessful
Applicants," this information takes on great significance.
To add insult to injury, the Committee of Bar Examiners made an
error in the formula that it disclosed for the computation of written
exam scores on the July 1995 Bar Examination. Using the formula that
was published in the "Information for Unsuccessful Applicants," many
people who might have obtained an automatic reappraisal of their exam
results after the "Phase II" reread and/or passed the exam did not
pass. The Committee became aware of the problem immediately, which
turned out to be a simple typographical error in the published formula
for computing Bar Exam results.
The Committee of Bar Examiners specifically will *NOT* entertain
petitions for reconsideration based on its grading system or the
judgment of its professional graders. However, it *WILL* entertain
requests for reconsideration based on clerical errors that resulted in
failure or prevented the automatic reappraisal of a Bar Exam. Of
course, this is no guarantee of a favorable turn of events, but it
does give examinees who should have passed the Bar Exam an opportunity
for a reread. Accordingly, if you receive a notice that you failed
the Bar Exam, you should obtain copies (as opposed to the originals)
of your written tests and look for arithmetic and/or clerical errors.

10.1.2) THE MULTISTATE PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY EXAM (MPRE).

The MPRE is a multiple choice exam, and the course offered at King
Hall in Professional Responsibility (PR) should cover the substance of
the MPRE. The King Hall PR course (as opposed to the MPRE) is a
requirement for graduation. It is usually a good idea to take both
the King Hall PR course and the MPRE at about the same time so that
you can use the PR course to help you prepare for the MPRE.

10.1.2.1) Submitting an Application for the MPRE.

Submit your application on time. There are very stiff fees for late
applications.

10.1.2.2) Preparing for the MPRE.

If you spend more than 40 hours preparing for the MPRE, you will be
overprepared. Review your materials for the King Hall PR course,
watch a taped lecture offered by one of the many commercial bar review
courses, and practice multiple choice questions for the MPRE.

10.1.2.3) Taking the MPRE.

The MPRE is just like any other standardized multiple choice exam, and
a mediocre performance is still a passing grade. If you don't pass
the MPRE the first time, you can take it over again as many times as
you like and no one will ever be the wiser.

10.1.3) THE MORAL CHARACTER EVALUATION.

The Moral Character Evaluation is probably the most invasive
experience you will probably ever have (barring an application for a
top secret security clearance), but very little will prevent you from
becoming a member of the California Bar, certainly nothing of which
you are unaware. If you are behind in child support or alimony, you
cannot qualify, but most other people without felony criminal records
do qualify. Just make sure that you fully disclose all of the
blemishes and warts that may appear on your record.
Completing the Moral Character Evaluation Application is quite a
chore. You must obtain accurate information about things for which
you probably don't maintain any records. Moreover, you must get your
fingerprints taken by a law enforcement official. Contact Community
Service Officer Christian Sandvig (<mailto:d...@dcn.davis.ca.us >) of
the Davis Police Department at (916)756-3740 for information on how
and when to have your fingerprints taken.

10.2) EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES AFTER LAW SCHOOL.

The nice thing about being an attorney is that you can always find
work. However, you can't always find a job with a law firm, or a job
that you want, or a job that pays you what you are worth. In many
instances, an attorney must work for him or herself. Don't be afraid
to do contract work, contact your local bar association for referral
business, or seek employment outside of the legal profession.

10.3) LIFE AS AN ATTORNEY.

Lawyers are hated and feared by most people because lawyers are most
commonly associated with legal problems like divorce, personal injury,
and criminal prosecution. Indeed, this is how most people first
encounter lawyers. But most lawyers have nothing to do with divorce,
personal injury, or the administration of criminal justice. They work
for very rich people who pay very well for legal advice on wills,
contracts, and other legal instruments that prevent people from ever
having to appear in court.
When a good lawyer does his or her job well and gets paid for it,
it's simply not newsworthy. Many lawyers are thus quietly transformed
from being starving students to being upper middle class
professionals. Many people make more money after they graduate from
law school than they or anyone else in their families have ever made
in their entire lives. I often hear stories about the disappearing
middle class (i.e., the rich get richer and the poor get poorer).
Higher education explains this statistical anomaly because of its
resulting "leapfrog effect" on personal income, particularly with
professional programs like law school.
Along with the money, law school graduates obtain tremendously
enhanced personal prestige because they command respect in their
business and personal dealings with people who are unfamiliar with the
law. Having a law degree, however, does not necessarily make you a
better person. In some instances, it does exactly the opposite. But
that's a topic that is well beyond the scope of this FAQ.

11) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT COMPUTERS AND LIFE ON THE INTERNET
FROM MEMBERS OF THE KING HALL COMMUNITY.

The best places to obtain information about computers and life on the
Internet at King Hall are from Computer Specialist Steve Langford
(<mailto:sdlan...@ucdavis.edu >) at (916)752-SLOW, Information
Technology--Campus Access Point (IT-CAP <mailto:ith...@ucdavis.edu >)
at (916)752-2548, or from the USENET newsgroup ucd.comp.questions
(<news:ucd.comp.questions >); readers with a web browser may visit the
Network Administrator Resources FAQ Page on the World Wide Web
(<http://tsp.ucdavis.edu/nar/NAR-FAQS.html >). If you want to speak
to an IT-CAP consultant, you should be prepared to furnish him or her
with your login id and identification number.

11.1) BASIC QUESTIONS ABOUT COMPUTERS.

11.1.1) Why should I use a computer?

It is easier and faster to accomplish many tasks by using a computer.

11.1.1.1) Do I really need to use a computer?

No. You don't need to use a computer, but many tasks are very
difficult or even impossible to accomplish without a computer. You
will also find that a modicum of computer literacy is required of all
members of the King Hall community.

11.1.1.2) Isn't it difficult to learn how to use a computer?

No. Learning to use a computer is very easy, but this is a very well
kept secret. People who are familiar with computers are very
intimidating to people who do not know how to use computers.

11.1.1.3) How can I get the computer training that I need?

Admit your ignorance, both to yourself and to the people who offer you
help. Teaching people how to use computers is extremely difficult,
but it doesn't have to be that way. Many people erroneously assume
that they understand how computers work, and this makes teaching these
people extremely difficult. Of course, people who know what they are
doing may not be able to communicate with you or they may not be
interested in helping you. Avoid these people.

11.1.1.4) What practical uses would I have for a computer as a law
student?

Most law students find that using a computer for word processing is
much easier than typing a paper. Moreover, most law firms use
WordPerfect and demand that their associates be familiar with
WordPerfect. While word processing is not the only application for
computers, it is easily the most common and most popular (second only
to computer games). Once you become familiar with word processing,
however, you may want to stop by a store that sells software and do
some window shopping.

11.1.2) Do I need my own computer?

No. Computers are as ubiquitous as telephones. The only reason you
would want to have your own computer is for convenience, much like
owning a cellular phone.

11.1.2.1) What kind of computer should I buy?

You should buy a computer with the features that you want at a price
you can afford. If you are reading this FAQ for a recommendation,
then you probably want either a Macintosh(r) or an IBM/IBM Clone (PC).

11.1.2.1.1) What is the difference between a Macintosh(r) and an IBM/IBM
Clone (PC)?

Macintosh(r) computers are much higher quality technology than PCs.
However, PCs are the standard for computer technology and they are
much more affordable than Macintoshes(r). Thus, if you are on a
limited budget, you probably want a PC, especially because whatever
you do buy will be obsolete before you buy it.

11.1.2.1.2) What is an IBM/IBM Clone (PC)?

IBM assembles its computers from technology that is available on the
open market and sets the standard for other computer companies (at
least it once did). Many companies build IBM clones (properly
referred to as PCs) with technology that meets or exceeds the
standards that IBM sets.

11.1.2.2) What kind of features should I have on a computer?

There is no easy answer to this question, but as a general rule avoid
all the bells and whistles and buy only proven technology. New
technology is inherently unreliable because many bugs are found only
after a product has been released. Members of the King Hall community
have access to a variety of computers through facilities supported by
IT-CAP (<mailto:ith...@ucdavis.edu >), so find out for yourself what
features are the most useful and reliable.

11.1.2.3) What kind of accessories should I get on my computer?

It depends upon what type of applications you are using. If you are
reading this FAQ for a recommendation, then you probably only need a
printer and/or modem (if that); you can probably get by without either
one.

- - - - -

End of document:

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 8 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >

Link to next document:

<http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part9.html >

Internet Esquire

unread,
Apr 9, 2004, 7:57:56 AM4/9/04
to
Archive-name: ucdavis/king-hall-faq/part9

Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Jun. 22, 1996
Version: 21Jun96 [ASCII/Multipart]
URL: <http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/ucdavis/
king-hall-faq/part9/faq.html >
Ebb: <http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~netesq/USENET-FAQs/king-hall/part8.html >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 9 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >


The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ (King Hall USENET FAQ) may be comprised
of more than one part. If it is, please see the TABLE OF CONTENTS in Part
One for a complete list of the questions that I have attempted to answer
and for other important legal information. Caveat emptor: I assume no
obligation to anyone through the publication of the King Hall USENET FAQ.
Furthermore, all versions of the King Hall USENET FAQ are my personal
property and are protected by applicable copyright laws. All rights are
reserved except as follows: I hereby give my permission to anyone who has
access to this version of the King Hall USENET FAQ to reproduce the
information contained herein for non-profit purposes, provided that proper
credit is given to me as the author of this FAQ and that I am promptly
notified of any use other than personal use. I may revoke permission to
reproduce any version of this FAQ at any time.

- - - - -

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 9 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996 by David F. Prenatt, Jr.

11.2) What computer facilities are available to law students at U.C.
Davis?

U.C. Davis provides computer facilities for all registered students,
including PCs, Macintoshes, and Internet access. Call IT-CAP
(<mailto:ith...@ucdavis.edu >) at (916)752-2548 for more information;
readers with a web browser may visit the Lab Management Home Page on
the World Wide Web (<http://lm.ucdavis.edu/labs/ >). In addition,
King Hall provides computer resources specifically for law students,
such as LEXIS and Westlaw. There are two computer rooms at King Hall:
The LEXIS/Westlaw room upstairs, and the computer lab in the basement.

11.2.1) How do I obtain access to the computer facilities at U.C. Davis?

Open an ez-account. You can do this at the LEXIS/Westlaw room in King
Hall or at any of the computer rooms anywhere on campus. However, you
will usually have to wait at least 24 hours before you can use your
account.

11.2.2) Will I lose access to computer services at U.C. Davis after I
graduate? [Rev]

Yes. Your account will be tagged for expiration the day after you
graduate, and you will have to prove that you are still affiliated
with the University to retain your computer privileges. In other
words, you are not entitled to computer privileges after you graduate
unless you remain affiliated with the University, and your privileges
may be unceremoniously interrupted at any time after that.

11.2.3) What should I do to make sure that I still have access to computer
services at U.C. Davis after I graduate?

For a small monthly fee, the Davis Community Network (DCN) will give
you 50 hours of access to the dial-in computer services that U.C.
Davis provides to it students. [Note: mother.com, America On Line,
and some other private ISPs/BBSs provide access to the ucd.*
newsgroups.] Anyone can telnet to the DCN server to join the DCN
(<telnet:wheel.dcn.davis >). For further information, see the
davis.dcn USENET newsgroup (<news:davis.dcn >) or visit the DCN Home
Page on the World Wide Web (<http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/ >).
The National Public Telecomputing Network (NPTN) sponsors several
"Freenets" that provide free Internet access. For more information,
e-mail NPTN (<mailto:in...@nptn.org >) or ftp NPTN's Freenet Guide
(<ftp://nptn.org/pub/nptn/nptn.info/concept.community.computing >).
The most satisfactory and reasonably priced for profit ISP is UUNET.
For more information on UUNET, send your snail-mail address to UUNET
(<mailto:in...@uunet.uu.net > uunet!info). Whatever Internet service
provider that you choose, you will probably have to provide your own
computer and your own modem.

11.3) What is the Internet?

The Internet is the product of a worldwide computer network developed
by the military in the late 1960s (ARPANET), nurtured by academicians
over the last 20 years or so, and currently used primarily as a medium
for the communication and free exchange of information and ideas for
anyone who knows how to obtain Internet access. There are more
breathtaking Internet applications, but they are not for "newbies" and
they are well beyond the scope of this FAQ.

11.3.1) How can I obtain access to the Internet?

You can use your ez-account to "telnet" to one of the computers at
U.C. Davis from King Hall, from one of the computer rooms on the U.C.
Davis campus, or from your home computer via modem.

11.3.1.1) How do I obtain access to the Internet from King Hall?

Go to the LEXIS/Westlaw room or the Computer Room on the second floor
of King Hall. You will find several IBM clones with the Windows
program running in the LEXIS/Westlaw room. If it is your first time
signing on to the Internet, you will probably need some help.


Computer Specialist Steve Langford (<mailto:sdlan...@ucdavis.edu >)

works in the office adjoining the LEXIS/Westlaw room, and it his job
to help the members of the King Hall community with all of their
computer needs. Steve has written a set of instructions on how to
open your ez-account and use the computers in the LEXIS/Westlaw room.

11.3.1.2) How do I obtain access to the Internet from one of the computer
rooms on the U.C. Davis campus?

Every computer room is a little different, but they are all pretty
straightforward. Check with the site attendant on duty if you need
any help.

11.3.1.3) How do I obtain access to the Internet from my home computer?

You will need a modem and some sort of communications software. Once
you have your communications software up and running, you can dial
(916)752-7900 to access the various computer services that are
available to U.C. Davis students, faculty, and staff through IT-CAP.
With a PC system, you are well advised to use the Windows operating
system. This will enable you to install a constellation of public
domain and educational software that is available to U.C. Davis
students free of charge (i.e., Trumpet Winsock, WinQVT, Win32s 1.2,
Wgopher, Netscape, Mpeg, and Lview). Contact a consultant at IT-CAP
<mailto:ith...@ucdavis.edu > at (916)752-2548 for information on how
to obtain copies of these programs or other programs that will work on
whatever computer you may have.
Once installed, the programs that I listed above will give you
access to the Internet through a U.C. Davis SLIP connection by dialing
(916)752-7925 (PPP access is also available). [Note: Some of these
programs may run *very* slowly on a SLIP connection depending upon the
type of computer that you have.] King Hall Computer Specialist Steve
Langford (<mailto:sdlan...@ucdavis.edu >) has put together a handout
on the installation of these programs. However, you must first obtain
the software that you need from IT-CAP in the Shields Library.

11.3.2) How do I communicate with other people on the Internet?

Communication between individuals on the Internet usually takes place
through the institutions of e-mail and the USENET newsgroups. These
are the most straightforward and easy to use Internet applications.
Live time conversations also take place with the Internet Relay Chat
(IRC) and the World Wide Web provides multimedia communication. I
hesitate to mention the highly intrusive Internet communication
software "talk/ytalk," but for those of you who want more information
on how to interrupt people with a talk request, contact David T.
Witkowski (<mailto:dtwit...@ucdavis.edu >; readers with a web
browser may visit David T. Witkowski's Ytalk Primer on the World Wide
Web (<http://www.ece.ucdavis.edu/~witkowsk/ytalk.html >).

11.3.2.1) Are there any rules for e-mail and the USENET newsgroups?

Yes. U.C. Davis imposes regulations for e-mail and the USENET with
its Acceptable Use Policy. There are also informal rules of conduct
that are enforced by the Internet community, fondly referred to as
"netiquette." Contact Student Judicial Affairs Officer Donald Dudley
(<mailto:djdu...@ucdavis.edu >), King Hall Class of 1993, at
(916)752-1128 for more information about the U.C. Davis Acceptable Use
Policy. As for netiquette, use your own good judgement.

11.3.2.2) What is the difference between e-mail and the USENET newsgroups?

The primary difference between e-mail and the USENET is privacy.
However, neither e-mail or the USENET are completely confidential.
While an e-mail message is not completely private, it is directed to a
particular individual or group of individuals; a USENET article is
available to anyone who has access to any newsgroup where the article
is posted. If you want to conduct confidential communications over
the Internet, check out an encryption program such as PGP ("Pretty
Good Privacy").
PGP has a public domain version that is available free of charge
to anyone who is using it for non-commercial purposes. It has
thwarted virtually every attempt that people have made to crack it.
What makes PGP unique is that the key that encrypts your mail (i.e.,
your "public key") is distinct and separate from the key that
unscrambles it (i.e., your "private key"). Unless you tell someone
your private PGP key or someone guesses it (which could take thousands
of years of computer time) or discovers it by eavesdropping, no one
can read your PGP encrypted mail.

11.3.2.2.1) How do I use e-mail?

The most straightforward and easy way to use e-mail is by using a
program called "pine," which is an acronym for "pine is no-longer elm"
("elm" was an e-mail program on which pine was based) To use pine,
type in "pine" (without the quotes) at the Unix prompt. Pine is menu-
driven, so just follow the instructions.

11.3.2.2.2) How do I access the USENET newsgroups?

The most straightforward and easy way to use the USENET newsgroups at
U.C. Davis is by using a newsreader called "tin." To use tin, type in
"tin" (without the quotes) at the Unix prompt. The tin program is
menu-driven, so just follow the instructions.

11.3.2.2.2.1) How many USENET newsgroups are there?

There are several thousand USENET newsgroups (more than anyone could
ever hope to read) and more are being created every day. Thus, you
have to decide which newsgroups you want to read.

11.3.2.2.2.2) How do I figure out which USENET newsgroups I want to read?

The USENET newsgroups are organized into a heirarchy that includes
regional and other domains. You can use this hierarchy to select-out
thousands of newsgroups that do not interest you. With tin, use the
"yank" command (with the "y" key), the "search" command (with the "/"
key), and the "subscribe" command (with the "s" key). After you've
subscribed to the named groups that you want, simply yank out the
rest. The "unsubscribe" command (the "u" key) will eliminate unwanted
groups. For more information, use the online help in tin (^g).

11.3.2.2.2.3) Which USENET newsgroups are of interest to members of the
King Hall community?

It depends upon the individual, but at the very least members of the
King Hall community would probably be interested in a number of the
regional domains that are available through the U.C. Davis USENET;
people who are new to the Internet would also be interested in a
number of newsgroups found in the news.* domain. You should subscribe
to news.announce.newusers (<news:news.announce.newusers >) until you
feel that you know more than most of the people reading that
newsgroup. You will also find FAQs on every conceivable topic in the
news.answers USENET newsgroup.

11.3.2.2.2.3.1) What regional domains are available through the U.C. Davis
USENET?

The ucd.* domain, the ucb.* domain, the davis.* domain, the yolo.*
domain, the sac.* domain, the ba.* domain, and the ca.* domain are all
regional domains that the U.C. Davis USENET can access; Netscape can
access virtually any USENET domain through the World Wide Web.

11.3.2.2.2.3.2) Does King Hall have its own USENET newsgroup?

But of course! The ucd.king-hall newsgroup (<news:ucd.king-hall >)
was founded by Joel Siegel, King Hall Class of 1997.

11.3.2.3) How do I use the IRC?

To use the IRC, type in "irc" (without the quotes) at the Unix prompt.
There is online help available for the IRC and most of the people whom
you meet on the IRC will be willing to answer your newbie questions.
You will also find a FAQ on the IRC in the news.answers USENET
newsgroup (among other places).

11.3.2.4) How do I access the World Wide Web?

You can access the World Wide Web by using a text-based program, such
as "lynx," or by using a web browser, such as "Netscape." Access to
the multi-media features of various web sites (i.e., pictures and
sound) is the biggest advantage of using Netscape.

11.3.2.4.1) How do I use lynx?

Just type in "lynx" (without the quotes) at the Unix prompt, and
follow the instructions you find on the screen.

11.3.2.4.2) How do I use Netscape?

Netscape is easy to use and has many revolutionary and exciting multi-
media/multi-protocol features, but you will probably need help from
someone who knows what he or she is doing to get started, so see Steve
Langford in the LEXIS/Westlaw computer room. For more information,
readers with a web browser may visit the Netscape Home Page on the
World Wide Web (<http://home.netscape.com/ >).

11.3.3) What other resources are available over the Internet?

In addition to the communication and exchange of information that
people accomplish using e-mail, the USENET, and the IRC, people can
download archived information from computers on the Internet using
"file transfer protocol" (ftp).

11.3.3.1) What is ftp and how does it work?

The ftp function resembles the telnet function (the basic method of
gaining access to the Internet for e-mail and the USENET), but ftp is
only used for downloading or uploading information. There are
generally two ways to access a computer via ftp, anonymous and
privileged.

11.3.3.1.1) How do I use anonymous ftp?

When you know which anonymous ftp site has the information that you
want, you can then log onto it and get that information using the ftp
program:

* Type in "ftp" (without the quotes) at the Unix prompt,
followed by the name of the ftp site that you wish to
access. For example:

ftp ftp.site

where ftp.site is the name of a hypothetical ftp site that
you want to access. If this doesn't work, try "open" in
place of "ftp."

* You will be asked to provide your username, type in:

anonymous


* You will be asked to provide your password.

DO NOT TYPE IN YOUR PASSWORD! *ANONYMOUS* FTP IS SUPPOSED
TO BE *ANONYMOUS*! If you wish, you may type in your
Internet address as a return address, but you do not need to
do so. Virtually any response to the password request will
give you access to an anonymous ftp site.

* Type in the GET command, followed by the exact name of the
file that you want to obtain. For example:

get ftp-document

where ftp-document is the name of a hypothetical document
that you wish to obtain. This procedure will retrieve an
ASCII document.

* If for some reason, there is something wrong with the
document that you obtain, start over and set the code to
binary by typing in "binary" (without the quotes) after you
have opened the anonymous ftp site. Specifically, type in
the following:

binary

This should fix the problem so that you can GET the document
that you want. If it doesn't, then the file you have is
probably compressed or encrypted, so you will need to find
out what program you should use to decompress or decrypt the
file. Check with King Hall Computer Specialist Steve
Langford for more information.

* To quit the ftp application, type in "quit" (without the
quotation marks). For example:

quit


Note: Steve Langford (<mailto:sdlan...@ucdavis.edu >) has set up
several of the computers in the LEXIS/Westlaw with simplified ftp
access with the Fetch program. Contact Steve Langford at (916)752-
SLOW for more information.

11.3.3.1.2) How do I use privileged ftp?

A privileged ftp site requires an actual username and an actual
password (as opposed to an anonymous one). In addition to the GET
command, you can also use the PUT command with privileged ftp. For
example:

put ftp-document

where ftp-document is the hypothetical name of the document that you
want to load to the privileged ftp site.

11.3.3.1.3) How can I find out what files are available via ftp?

You can use various "search engines" on the Internet, such as
"gopher," "archie, and "veronica." My favorite search engine on the
World Wide Web is Yahoo (<http://www.yahoo.com/ >).

11.3.3.1.3.1) What is a gopher?

The term gopher primarily refers to a computer protocol and a type of
menu-driven computer application. People use gophers to burrow
through the Internet, figuratively speaking, and help them find the
information that they want. Gophers are named after the mascot of the
University of Minnesota where the gopher protocol was developed. All
the gophers in the world are interconnected, so if you want to use a
gopher, simply type in "gopher" (without the quotes) at the Unix
prompt and follow the directions.

11.3.3.1.3.2) Who (or what) is/are Veronica and Jughead?

Veronica (*Very *Easy *Rodent *Oriented *Netwide *Index to *Computer
*Archives) and Jughead (*Jonzi's *Universal *Gopher *Hierarchy
*Excavation *And *Display) are somewhat dated gopher-based search
engines.

11.3.3.1.3.3) Who (or what) is Archie?

Archie (*Archive *Retrieval *C--- *H--- *I--- *E---) is a search
engine that helps you locate computer programs that are archived on
ftp sites on the Internet. To use Archie, simply type in "archie"
(without the quotes) at the Unix prompt and follow the directions.

11.3.3.1.4) How do I obtain ftp files by e-mail request?

For information on ftp by e-mail service, send an e-mail message to
ftp...@decwrl.dec.com with the text "help" somewhere in the body of
the message. Many ftp sites have mail-server software that will send
ftp files by e-mail request. For example, to obtain this faq by e-
mail send the following message to mail-...@rtfm.mit.edu:

send usenet/news.answers/ucdavis/king-hall-faq/part*
. . .
quit

Where * is replaced by the numbers 1 through 9 in successive lines of
text. Other FAQs that I have written are archived at rtfm.mit.edu
under the usenet/news.answers directory under the appropriate archive
name. See Section 1.5 for more information about these other FAQs.
To obtain one of these other FAQs change the text of the line that
begins with send so that the archive name ucdavis/king-hall-faq is
replaced with the archive name of the other FAQ.

11.3.3.1.5) How do I transfer files to and from my personal computer and
my Internet account?

You can put your files on a diskette and use one of the workstations
on campus to ftp your files to and from your Internet account.
Alternatively, there are several file transfer programs available to
accomplish such tasks. Your best option among those that are
currently available is a kermit file transfer. Kermit is public
domain software that is available from IT-CAP; instructions for kermit
file transfers are available on the World Wide Web at the U.C. Davis
Network Administrators FAQ:

<http://tsp.ucdavis.edu/nar/FAQ-UNIX.html#Tag-MSKermit >

11.3.3.2) What legal resources are available on the Internet?

There are too many legal resources available on the Internet for me to
offer a complete catalog. However, there are two superb resources
that will help you find out what legal resources are available on the
Internet and where you can find them for yourself:

* The law.listserv.* USENET newsgroups are an excellent resource
for cutting-edge legal information of all kinds. The newsgroup
law.listserv.law-lib (<news:law.listserv.law-lib >), moderated by
Associate Director Judy Janes (<mailto:jcj...@ucdavis.edu >) of
the U.C. Davis Law School Library is one of the most popular.
This newsgroup is frequented by thousands of law librarians, law
professors, and other legal scholars. A word of caution though:
Do not identify yourself as an outsider unless you are ready to
suffer the ridicule of thousands of erudite individuals.

* Erik J. Heels, who heads up Lawyer's Cooperative Publishing
(<http://www.lcp.com/ >), has compiled a very comprehensive list
of legal resources available on the Internet:

The Legal List,
Law-Related Resources Available on the Internet and
Elsewhere (ISBN 0-9643637-0-4).

The Legal List is always available on the news.answers USENET
newsgroup (<news:news.answers >) as well as many other
newsgroups. A paperback edition of the Legal List is also
available from the author. The Legal List is an invaluable
reference tool, and I unequivocally recommend that anyone with
any interest whatsoever in the law or the Internet get a copy of
the Legal List as soon as possible.

11.4) ISSUES ARISING FROM THE USE OF PERSONAL COMPUTERS AT KING HALL.

The recent dramatic increase in the use of personal computers at King
Hall has given rise to some novel issues. For example, you will
probably notice a number of your classmates use laptop computers in
class. This prompted the law school administration to post
"unofficial guidelines" for computer etiquette. Similarly, Cecilia
Wong, King Hall Class of 1997, asked LSA to impose a "30 minute
courtesy time limit" for the computers in the LEXIS/Westlaw room so
that people could check their e-mail without being inconvenienced by
the people who monoplize these computers.
IMHO, these measures were (at best) misguided attempts to enforce
the personal values of a few uninformed individuals upon the entire
law school community. Accordingly, I complained to the powers that be
at King Hall when the guidelines for computer etiquette were posted on
the dayboard. Similarly, I was present on other business at the LSA
meeting where the "courtesy time limit" was proposed; when asked my
opinion, I spoke out against it. In both cases, I was ignored.
As there was no official enforcement of these measures during my
tenure as a law student, I ignored them (which seemed like an
appropriate quid pro quo), and I recommend that you do the same. If
someone has a legitimate gripe arising from a breach of etiquette,
there is no reason why it cannot be resolved privately. Someone who
types on a laptop in class is no more offensive than someone who wears
too much perfume. The offended party can either speak up or move to
another seat. Similarly, if a person wants to check his or her e-mail
when all of the computer terminals are occupied in the LEXIS/Westlaw
room, that person can simply ask for permission from someone who is
already seated or wait his or her turn.
People can check their e-mail at hundreds of locations on the
U.C. Davis campus, some as close as the basement computer room at King
Hall. And in comparison to most other computer applications, e-mail
is nothing more than a frivolous use of computer resources. I'm sure
that some people would like to issue a sidearm, tire chalk, and a
citation book to Computer Specialist Steve Langford so that he can
enforce the tyrrany of a few uninformed student leaders. However,
Steve probably has more important things to do; I know that LSA does.

12) REVISIONS FOR FUTURE VERSIONS OF THIS FAQ.

[Note: Expect periodic revisions in this section and/or its
subsections.] I will add or change the information in this FAQ as it
becomes necessary. However, this FAQ all but completed its puberty
with the publication of Version 1.5 on November 5, 1995. If
information is substantially changed or deleted in the future, I will
make a note of it in this section; I may also post a separate USENET
article. The following notations will be used in section headers to
point out revisions in this FAQ:

* [CORRECTIONS]--If information is revised because of
substantial inaccuracy, I will mark the heading with this
notation; I will *not* note minor corrections.

* [Del]--Old section deleted.

* [New]--New section.

* [Rev]--Revised section.

* [Moved from . . .]/[Moved to . . .]--Section moved;
information unchanged.

As the above notations are meant to accomodate regular readers of
this FAQ, these notations will only appear for one month.

12.1) CHANGES IN THIS VERSION OF THE KING HALL USENET FAQ FROM PREVIOUS
VERSIONS.

This version of this FAQ (Version 21Jun96) should contain most of the
information contained in Version 1.5 with only minor editorial
changes. The most important revision was in the URL references from
the ftp server at rtfm.mit.edu to the hypertext version located at the
USENET FAQ project (passim).

12.2) CHANGES THAT WILL TAKE PLACE IN FUTURE VERSIONS OF THIS FAQ.

I will probably leave the structure and substance of this FAQ intact,
but I will continue to add more subsections and questions and modify
details if it becomes necessary to do so. I will revise the html
version of this FAQ that is currently available at the USENET FAQ
project sometime soon (the current version was created by the USENET
FAQ Project's software).
Your comments are very much welcome and appreciated, but I am not
able to respond to every person individually. If you have any
questions that you would like to see answered in this FAQ, please let
me know by e-mail or snail-mail. I would also like to know how you
came across this FAQ and where you think that I should post a notice
of its availability. While this FAQ answers inquiries that I receive
from all over the USENET, I only post this FAQ to ucd.king-hall
(<news:ucd.king-hall >) and news.answers (<news:news.answers >) once a
month to conserve that mystical and increasingly rare commodity known
as bandwidth. For those of you who do not wish to view this FAQ in
the future, you may activate the killfile function on tin (Ctrl-K).

- - - - -

End of document:

The King Hall Law School USENET FAQ Part 9 of 9


Frequently Asked Questions at and about King Hall
(c) Copyright 1995 & 1996

by

David F. Prenatt, Jr.
King Hall, 1995 Alumnus
U.C. Davis School of Law
University of California
Davis, CA 95616-5210

<mailto:Net...@dcn.davis.ca.us >

Last document.

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages